Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Your Current FS Flight

Collapse
This is a sticky topic.
X
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • My next thing will be, from EDDF to Kloten Intl, indeed. But only since the Eurowings of Düsseldorf has published their special
    damn disease flight schedule April 2020 ,
    as I call it.

    The original plan was, from EDDF to Lohausen home airport, then EDDL to Basle-Mulhouse as Microsoft calls it.
    In Schweizerdeutsch, Basel Mülhausen,
    and all the French know that airport with the name Bâle-Mulhouse (ICAO: LFSB) .

    But the
    damn disease flight schedule April 2020
    does not contain Eurowings Düsseldorf flights to Basel Mülhausen, only to Kloten.

    So, I changed my plan. Vancouver - Rhein/Main - Kloten . With an aircraft change at Rhein/Main, from B744 to Beech King Air 350 turbopropeller, and then to Kloten. with an option for Lugano (not to be confused with Locarno!).

    I don't really need this very very very short runway at Locarno,
    which in my eyes is closed for two-engined turbopropellers e.g. Beech Super King Air 350, due to 'very short rwy' (only 2,624 ft, or better, only 800 meters long!).

    So, Lugano instead of Locarno. In this moment I see Alex who definitely knows what I'm aiming at... Yes. Piz Segnas. But with a few quite important differences:
    A year 1999 turbopropeller instead of an eighty year old (!!) three-engined piston propeller.
    A ceiling of 35,000 with pressurization, instead of less than 21,000 without oxygen (!).

    Piz Segnas, peak elevation 10,167 .
    Alex, das kurz auf Deutsch, so wichtige Sachen immer in der Muttersprache, oder wie macht ihr das.
    Der verstorbene Flugkapitän an jenem verhängnisvollen August Tag kam von der Swiss, Flugzeugtyp LX A340 (!) . Deswegen würde ich mir nie anmaßen zu sagen, er hat den Leistungsverlust von so einem dreimotorigen Vorkriegspropeller (!) an einem heißen August Tag außer Acht gelassen. Aber ISA Bedingungen haben an dem Tag nachweislich auch niemals geherrscht, es war schon beim Start weit heißer als +15°C. Berichtet werden +20°C beim take off in Locarno, und aufgrund der Inversionswetterlage (?!) nicht weniger in der Höhe.
    Deswegen versuche ich es mit einem Turbopropeller, der zur Not nach oben hin ausweichen kann, die Power dazu besitzt. Mal sehen wie weit ich komme.
    ...

    So far, CU soon,
    and dear greetings to Switzerland!
    Last edited by LH-B744; 2020-04-23, 02:18. Reason: My Intention: to safely cross the peak Piz Segnas (elev 10,167). Noch jemand muss da bestimmt nicht rein scheppern!
    That's what airlines are good for, amongst others,
    The Gold Member in the 747 club, 50 years since the first LH 747.
    And constantly advanced, 744 and 748 /w upper and lower EICAS.
    Aviation enthusiast, since more than 35 years with home airport EDDL.

    Comment


    • Brian always says, before you try bad English, better write it in German. So, that's what I tried here in my #511 .
      Dreimotoriger Vorkriegspropeller, in English?

      I don't know. I only came back to publish the Lugano weather for Saturday.
      +24°C during daylight.
      Saturday April 25th 2020 seems to be quite an interesting day if you use fsgrw .

      Sometimes I write a memory for myself. Or also for all those who are keen enough to fly a propeller aircraft (with MTOW, as during the Piz Segnas crash) on a hot day.

      I'm not really Captain Keen, I rather try to survive all flights, even those who I begin in a simulator. As a good Flight Captain with a type license for Airbus A340, I'd always try to avoid MTOW, especially on a hot day. But why.

      On a day with weather conditions which do not fulfil the ISA standards, e.g. much hotter than +15°C, all combustion engines have problems and you don't get all the horse power which is theoretically on the paper. But why. The hotter the air the less dense it is. The less dense the air the less oxygen, the less oxygen, the worse for a fire/for a combustion.
      Ladeluftkühler is a German word which describes the problem for turbocharged car engines and turbocharged truck engines.

      Thus, what can you do if you expect a hot day, with +20°C during take off or even +24°C or more. Avoid MTOW. In Randazzo's LH-B744 I only very very seldom (or almost never) have experienced weather conditions where I thought, now a little bit lighter and a little bit higher (i.e. a little bit cooler, under normal conditions),

      but this is the reason why LH is in the 747 club since half a century. You never, and I really mean never, feel underpowered in a Boeing 747.

      PS: I am old enough to know the reference sheet for a Lufthansa Boeing 747-200 passenger jet. Ref sheet, not spec sheet. The reference sheet for a LH-B742 always included the take off run (TORA) in combination with the Take Off Weight and the air temperature on the rwy.
      3,300 meter in a 747-200 with MTOW, but only under ISA conditions, i.e. a longer rwy is needed at +20 or +24°C .
      The 747-400 needs 3,090 meter (ISA), if you again
      avoid maximum take off weight (MTOW) .

      Which as long as I fly Randazzo's LH-B744 always was very easy for me. You only very rarely need a B744 with MTOW, that rather seems a task for Qantas.
      ...
      Ok ok, I don't wanna bore you, back on topic.
      That's what airlines are good for, amongst others,
      The Gold Member in the 747 club, 50 years since the first LH 747.
      And constantly advanced, 744 and 748 /w upper and lower EICAS.
      Aviation enthusiast, since more than 35 years with home airport EDDL.

      Comment


      • There is one man which really should become a jetphotos Senior member. He's available on youtube with his real name, but I don't know if I should publish his name again. So, let's call him
        S. LH .
        His history of type licences since 1978 include both, the LH Airbus A340 and the LH Boeing 747 .

        Since I know one or two things about a 747, but almost nothing about an A340, my question for him would be..

        The reference sheet for a 747-200 clearly says, the hotter the day and/or the higher the airport the faster all four jet engines even in a 747 come near to a limit where you only have the choice to take off with less weight, clearly less than MTOW, compared to the HB-HOT crash.

        Now, an A340 is a flying computer as I always say. Could it be that the step down from an A340 to
        an eighty years old (!!) Junkers JU 52
        is much bigger than it were the step down from a B747-200?!

        I'd assume than an A340 calculates everything without that the F/O or the Captain has to use mental arithmetic. And I strongly assume that in a 1978 B747-200 with INS, not everything was calculated by the aircaft itself.

        So. Majestätsbeleidigung, beinahe. But could it be, that a former A340 jet pilot completely unlearned that most of the propeller aircraft, e.g.
        JU 52 or Beech Super King Air 350
        do not automatically stop the climb or the descent at an altitude which was pre-defined by one of the pilots?

        And even in a 747-400, the two pilots in the cockpit are responsible so that the flight always stays in the limits of all the engines on board. That's no difference between a JU 52 and a B744.

        I assume that in an Airbus A340, a pilot much easier and much faster could lose his intuition (dt.: Intuition) for the combination of N1 number, altitude (above 10,000 and again, above 30,000), temperature, head wind (if you have one), and ground speed, than in a Boeing 747-200.

        In an Airbus, you pull the aileron until you've reached the desired v/s, and the a/c automatically holds the nose up. The same goes for the bank angle!
        In a JU 52 or in a 747, nothing like this will ever happen.

        As I said, Majestätsbeleidigung, almost. But did the HB-HOT crash happen because the experienced Flight Captain in a weak moment tried to fly that ancient propeller like an A340?

        With the knowledge and the intuition which you have as a jet pilot, alt 12,000 climb, alt 17,000 climb, alt 22,000 and higher climb, no problem?
        That's what airlines are good for, amongst others,
        The Gold Member in the 747 club, 50 years since the first LH 747.
        And constantly advanced, 744 and 748 /w upper and lower EICAS.
        Aviation enthusiast, since more than 35 years with home airport EDDL.

        Comment

        Working...
        X