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Fuel Crossfeed

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  • Tecnanaut
    replied
    Another reason to use crossfeed maybe due to one engine being older than the other. This isnt unheard of on airliners. As they rank up hours, engines start to run hotter and burn more fuel. On a long flight, the difference may be significant enough to open the crossfeeds.

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  • flyboy2548m
    replied
    And if your airplane is made by a bunch of French-Canadians the crossfeed is called crossflow, 'cause that's just so much sexier somehow.

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  • Dmmoore
    replied
    Originally posted by AVLWATCHER
    Thanks for the info. I was just looking at the 737NG FSX cockpit and wondering what use it would serve.
    On the 737, and all twin engine aircraft the engines feed fuel from tanks associated with that engine. Additional fuel may be carried in alternate tanks that is shared by both engines. When an engine fails, the fuel normally used by the failed engine is available for use in the operating engine by using the Xfeed system.

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  • AVLWATCHER
    replied
    Thanks for the info. I was just looking at the 737NG FSX cockpit and wondering what use it would serve.

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  • JordanD
    replied
    Originally posted by Tanner_J
    It pulls fuel from both sources (wings) at once. Basically if you leave it on one for a while you're going to lose alot of weight from one side and there have even been emergencies declared (smaller planes) where the pilot forgot to switch and thought he had run out of fuel, when his whole other wing was full. Basically it pulls the fuel evenly from both sources. Some planes however do not have the cross feed so it is important to keep your eye on it.
    Even more embarrasing when the pilot actually makes an emergency landing, crashes, kills somebody/breaks the plane, and then the investigators find he had another tank full of fuel.

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  • Tanner_J
    replied
    It pulls fuel from both sources (wings) at once. Basically if you leave it on one for a while you're going to lose alot of weight from one side and there have even been emergencies declared (smaller planes) where the pilot forgot to switch and thought he had run out of fuel, when his whole other wing was full. Basically it pulls the fuel evenly from both sources. Some planes however do not have the cross feed so it is important to keep your eye on it.

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  • AVLWATCHER
    started a topic Fuel Crossfeed

    Fuel Crossfeed

    This may sound like a stupid question, but what exactly does the fuel crossfeed do? I was just wondering under what circumstances would you use the crossfeed?
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