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Canon 100-400 I USM vs Tamron 150-600

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  • Canon 100-400 I USM vs Tamron 150-600

    Hey everyone!
    I'm looking to upgrade lenses from my Canon 75-300mm of which I am currently using.

    I know a couple of people with used lenses that are somewhat within my price range.
    But to be honest, I'm not really sure which one would be better. I've tried doing research into the Canon 100-400, but since it's the older version, there's not much I can find about it. And the Tamron 150-600 seems like a good lens, but it also sounds like the quality goes down a lot after 300mm?

    My current camera is a Canon T4i.

    So, for those of you that may have owned one or both of these, which one do you think would be better?
    The older Canon 100-400mm L lens, or the Tamron 150-600?

    I'm looking for the lens which focuses well and quickly, with good sharpness and little to no purple fringing.



    Thanks,
    Andrew
    Andrew - CVG Spotter
    Canon T4i - 75-300mm

  • #2
    The G2 version of Tamron is the best one. If you're considering G1 of 150-600mm then it's not the good idea because it gives soft images and not so efficient.

    On the other hand I would suggest you to go for Canon 100-400 because it is the sharpest lens in that range for Aviation Photography.

    Comment


    • #3
      I own both, the Canon 100-400 mk I and the Tamron 150-600g2. Both are great for spotting, both are sharp and they focus really quickly.

      Canon is smaller and much lighter, so it's easier to handle. You need to think about it, when you plan to go for a spotting trip for the whole day. It starts from 100mm, which is usefull when your spots are "close to action". It's a "pump action" lens, so you can change focal lenght in no time. I use my Canon for over 6 years now and I'm really happy about it, tho last year I had to send it to Canon's service, because that lovely pump mechanism got stuck at 100mm (unfortunatley it's a common thing). Repair cost was the equivalent of 300USD, and after that the lens works smooth.
      Photo examples: all of my AMS shots were taken with this lens: https://www.jetphotos.com/showphotos...d&sort-order=0

      Tamron has 600mm on the long end, so you can use it even for overflight shots. It has much better image stabilisation. Shrapness untill around 500-550mm wasn't and issue. Even if, you can also make AF adjustments using Tamron's Tap-in console to fix that. Cons? 150mm on a short end, but that is a con depending on a spotting location. You need a bigger bag to carry it around, it's heavier, and you really need to work your wrist to switch from 150mm to 600mm. I had no problems with it since i bought it, which was almost 3 years ago. Example shots: most of my "off runway/taxiway shots from FRA were taken with it: https://www.jetphotos.com/showphotos...d&sort-order=0
      Overflights: https://www.flickr.com/photos/125392...96480791/page1
      So whatever you'll choose you will be happy with it in strict photoshooting terms.

      You may also check the Tamron 100-400 (which can be even better than Canon 100-400 mk 1), or both versions (contemporary or sports) of Sigma 150-600.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by AndrewBison View Post
        Hey everyone!
        I'm looking to upgrade lenses from my Canon 75-300mm of which I am currently using.

        I know a couple of people with used lenses that are somewhat within my price range.
        But to be honest, I'm not really sure which one would be better. I've tried doing research into the Canon 100-400, but since it's the older version, there's not much I can find about it. And the Tamron 150-600 seems like a good lens, but it also sounds like the quality goes down a lot after 300mm?

        My current camera is a Canon T4i.

        So, for those of you that may have owned one or both of these, which one do you think would be better?
        The older Canon 100-400mm L lens, or the Tamron 150-600?

        I'm looking for the lens which focuses well and quickly, with good sharpness and little to no purple fringing.



        Thanks,
        Andrew
        If you are considering Canon 100-400, you might consider Tamron 100-400, I use this in Nikon version and I am pleased and of course not as big as 150-600.

        Comment


        • #5
          Thank you so much for all the help!!!
          Hmm, that Tamron 100-400 sounds interesting. I may end up getting that. I’m just going to do a bunch of research first.

          Though, I have one last question.
          Is there an accessory for the Tamron 100-400 that could make it zoom to 600mm? I know they make those for Canon lenses, just not sure about the Tamron.
          And if they do, would it be good quality, or would it just take the photo quality down a lot?



          Thanks!
          Andrew
          Andrew - CVG Spotter
          Canon T4i - 75-300mm

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by pawelm View Post
            I own both, the Canon 100-400 mk I and the Tamron 150-600g2. Both are great for spotting, both are sharp and they focus really quickly.

            Canon is smaller and much lighter, so it's easier to handle. You need to think about it, when you plan to go for a spotting trip for the whole day. It starts from 100mm, which is usefull when your spots are "close to action". It's a "pump action" lens, so you can change focal lenght in no time. I use my Canon for over 6 years now and I'm really happy about it, tho last year I had to send it to Canon's service, because that lovely pump mechanism got stuck at 100mm (unfortunatley it's a common thing). Repair cost was the equivalent of 300USD, and after that the lens works smooth.
            Photo examples: all of my AMS shots were taken with this lens: https://www.jetphotos.com/showphotos...d&sort-order=0

            Tamron has 600mm on the long end, so you can use it even for overflight shots. It has much better image stabilisation. Shrapness untill around 500-550mm wasn't and issue. Even if, you can also make AF adjustments using Tamron's Tap-in console to fix that. Cons? 150mm on a short end, but that is a con depending on a spotting location. You need a bigger bag to carry it around, it's heavier, and you really need to work your wrist to switch from 150mm to 600mm. I had no problems with it since i bought it, which was almost 3 years ago. Example shots: most of my "off runway/taxiway shots from FRA were taken with it: https://www.jetphotos.com/showphotos...d&sort-order=0
            Overflights: https://www.flickr.com/photos/125392...96480791/page1
            So whatever you'll choose you will be happy with it in strict photoshooting terms.

            You may also check the Tamron 100-400 (which can be even better than Canon 100-400 mk 1), or both versions (contemporary or sports) of Sigma 150-600.
            Thanks for the info! I was doing research into the Tamron 100-400, and saw a lot of reviews about the Sigma 100-400 being better..
            Do you own the Sigma 100-400, or know much about it? Some people say it's as sharp as the Canon 100-400 MK II.





            Thanks,
            Andrew
            Andrew - CVG Spotter
            Canon T4i - 75-300mm

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by AndrewBison View Post

              Thanks for the info! I was doing research into the Tamron 100-400, and saw a lot of reviews about the Sigma 100-400 being better..
              Do you own the Sigma 100-400, or know much about it? Some people say it's as sharp as the Canon 100-400 MK II.



              Thanks,
              Andrew
              No, I don't own it. Actually I didn't even realise that Sigma also makes 100-400mm lens, so I really don't know everything about it.
              And re your earlier question, Tamron makes 1,4x and 2x teleconverters, unfortunatley I don't own any of those. But from what I've read they affecting the quality and AF speed. I've tried Canon's 1,4x TC on my 100-400mk1 lens, and they AF didn't work at all on my old Canon 7D body. It's beacuse TC affects the aperture making it f/8, and in older Canon crop bodies AF simply doesn't work with lenses of aperture greater than 5,6. I don't know if it's an issue with Tamron's gear.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by AndrewBison View Post

                Thanks for the info! I was doing research into the Tamron 100-400, and saw a lot of reviews about the Sigma 100-400 being better..
                Do you own the Sigma 100-400, or know much about it? Some people say it's as sharp as the Canon 100-400 MK II.





                Thanks,
                Andrew
                I bought the Sigma 100-400 last summer and enjoy it. Granted I haven't had experience with the Canon 100-400, but did look up reviews and videos comparing the two. In the end they are similar, but the Sigma starts at f5 whereas the Canon starts at f4.5 and the Sigma doesn't have a tripod ring. In the videos the Canon did slightly edge out in sharpness, but only very slightly. I've used it for spotting, a couple air shows, and some other things, but I do enjoy it. I got mine for $800 rather than close to $2000 on amazon. I'm hoping to get my hands on the Canon one day, but the Sigma does the job well.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by AndrewBison View Post

                  Thanks for the info! I was doing research into the Tamron 100-400, and saw a lot of reviews about the Sigma 100-400 being better..
                  Do you own the Sigma 100-400, or know much about it? Some people say it's as sharp as the Canon 100-400 MK II.





                  Thanks,
                  Andrew
                  Just to remind you that in Sigma the zoom rotates to the left and Tamron rotates to the right. I have a Sigma18-200 and whenever I use it is a mess as it runs unlike my Tamron and Nikon lenses and in planespotting the frequency and speed we have to zoom is very important.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Sigma and Tamron 100-400 both have strengths and weaknesses. Tamron, however, is tropicalized.

                    Comment

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