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  • Lens vignetting issue

    Hello everyone

    Recently I have been having an issue with my Canon EF-S 55-250mm IS STM lens. Pictures at high focal lengths have come out with really bad vignetting that is generally unevenly distributed. I'm not the most knowledgeable when it comes to cameras, but I feel like this shouldn't be happening, as lens profile corrections on lightroom can't even fix it. Does anyone have an idea what could be causing this?

    Image rendered for Jetphotos (lens corrections applied)
    Click image for larger version  Name:	VH-EBG.jpg Views:	0 Size:	458.0 KB ID:	1081744

    Same image equalised (I'm aware of the dust spot, just didn't see much point removing it if the photo isn't acceptable)
    Click image for larger version  Name:	image.jpg Views:	0 Size:	984.9 KB ID:	1081741

  • #2
    Originally posted by Lehondre Photos View Post
    Hello everyone

    Recently I have been having an issue with my Canon EF-S 55-250mm IS STM lens. Pictures at high focal lengths have come out with really bad vignetting that is generally unevenly distributed. I'm not the most knowledgeable when it comes to cameras, but I feel like this shouldn't be happening, as lens profile corrections on lightroom can't even fix it. Does anyone have an idea what could be causing this?

    Image rendered for Jetphotos (lens corrections applied)
    Click image for larger version Name:	VH-EBG.jpg Views:	0 Size:	458.0 KB ID:	1081744

    Same image equalised (I'm aware of the dust spot, just didn't see much point removing it if the photo isn't acceptable)
    Click image for larger version Name:	image.jpg Views:	0 Size:	984.9 KB ID:	1081741
    As a rule of thumb, keep your aperture setting at f/8, f/9 or greater. For some reason this seems to eliminate vignetting for the most part. As far as the vignetting showing up at high focal lengths, chromatic aberration is a frequent problem of mine when I shoot in RAW format. This becomes much stronger at the extreme edges of my focal length range. I imagine it is the same case with vignetting. So--if possible--try to avoid spots that require a lot of focal length.

    Hope it helps. Very sorry if it didn't,
    Michael

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Lehondre Photos View Post
      Hello everyone

      Recently I have been having an issue with my Canon EF-S 55-250mm IS STM lens. Pictures at high focal lengths have come out with really bad vignetting that is generally unevenly distributed. I'm not the most knowledgeable when it comes to cameras, but I feel like this shouldn't be happening, as lens profile corrections on lightroom can't even fix it. Does anyone have an idea what could be causing this?
      Unfortunately this is not uncommon in lower-end lenses, especially zooms. In order to fit such a wide focal range in a relatively small (and affordable) package, some compromises have to be made in terms of quality. These compromises in quality (vignetting in your case, softness, and chromatic aberration as also mentioned) usually are most noticeable at the extreme ends of the focal range (widest & tightest angles) and when the aperture is more open. Closing down the aperture a bit to f/8-9 as suggested helps because you're using more just the center of the the lens glass, which tends to show fewer flaws than the corners do.

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      • #4
        Thanks for the responses guys. It seems I might need to work towards better lens. I'll take what I can get with this one in the mean time.

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        • #5
          in my case I used to slightly overexpose the images and fix that in post production, as well as not using full zoom. if you are going to resize your shot to 1280px width anyway, not much point to zoom all the way in

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          • #6
            Unfortunately this is a problem with all zooms, even high-end ones (however to a lesser extent). This depends on the angle of the camera (from the bottom to the top), in relation to the extreme focal length and the aperture used, in addition to the strong illumination. It can be reduced using a smaller aperture, but eliminating it in some situations is impossible.
            I have that lens too, but with my new Tamron 100-400, I have fewer problems with vignetting.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by mahagonny View Post
              Unfortunately this is a problem with all zooms, even high-end ones (however to a lesser extent). This depends on the angle of the camera (from the bottom to the top), in relation to the extreme focal length and the aperture used, in addition to the strong illumination. It can be reduced using a smaller aperture, but eliminating it in some situations is impossible.
              I have that lens too, but with my new Tamron 100-400, I have fewer problems with vignetting.
              By angle of the camera, do you mean when it's pointed towards the sky? For me, the vignetting only seems to appear when it is pointed up. It doesn't seem to be an issue when I point the camera towards the horizon or downwards. On the topic of a higher end lens, I'm looking at the Sigma 100-400 Contemporary which I believe is somewhat of an equivalent to the Tamron 100-400.

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              • #8
                In your case, you have an EF-S lens, i.e. a lens optimized for cameras wirh crop factor (EF-S is typically for Canon's APS-C sensor with a crop factor of 1.6). Getting a lens suitable for full frame cameras will already reduce vignetting. So, no need to get a Canon L-Lens just for that. AFAIK, the Tamron or Sigma 100-400 should already do the trick.

                Combine that with the tip above to go for f/8 or smaller aperture (i.e. higher f-numbers) should again lower vignetting.
                My photos on Flickr www.flickr.com/photos/geridominguez

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by LX-A343 View Post
                  In your case, you have an EF-S lens, i.e. a lens optimized for cameras wirh crop factor (EF-S is typically for Canon's APS-C sensor with a crop factor of 1.6). Getting a lens suitable for full frame cameras will already reduce vignetting. So, no need to get a Canon L-Lens just for that. AFAIK, the Tamron or Sigma 100-400 should already do the trick.

                  Combine that with the tip above to go for f/8 or smaller aperture (i.e. higher f-numbers) should again lower vignetting.
                  I don't think I'm too far into this aviation photography thing to justify a canon L lens but yeah, I think an upgrade to a Tamron or Sigma 100-400 is definitely in order when I can, especially if they pair well with an aps-c like you say.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Lehondre" Photos
                    By angle of the camera, do you mean when it's pointed towards the sky?
                    I mean this.
                    As LX-A34 says, if you use your Canon EF lens on a full-frame, it is not the most suitable solution.

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