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  • Exporting reduces quality significantly

    Hello, I recently switched to a slightly better camera, which would allow me to shoot photos in a much higher resolution. Thats great as now the details are much more defined. However, when i tried to export a photo (Original size 6000 x 4000), to the maximum approved JP limit (for me) of 1280px, there is a huge degrade in the sharpness of the image. Ive attached 2 images below, with the first being the riginal size and second one being the stepped-down size. May i ask if anyone is kind enough to shed light on any possible method for me to resize the images, in a way which would not sacrifice the sharpness (or not to that extent?). I am using Adobe Lightroom Classic CC, and use the resize tool in export options to resize my images. Your help is greatly appreciated!

    Note: The first image cannot be uploaded here due to the image exceeding the resize limit, so I will be attaching a link to the image.

    First image, high res https://i.imgur.com/Xp1CmhG.jpg

    Second image, resized to fit the max limit Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_3548-2.jpg
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ID:	1100676

  • #2
    Hello there, scaling the image down will always reduce quality. This can sometimes be used to your advantage, eg when you want to hide some compression/something unwanted etc. However, down-scaling the image always has its drawbacks, as you said, it makes the image less sharp etc. With soft images, you'll find it harder to get a img uploaded successfully here so you may want to change your workflow. What i mean by that is, before doing any adjustments to your picture, i'd suggest to scale it down to 1280px first (this is what I do). Now that you have an image you will be actually able to upload, edit it however you want, this includes adjustment to sharpening (which seems to be your main concern) and other issues the image may have. If you sharpen then scale to 1280px, the image perhaps may seem a fair bit soft - well at least for most of my cases. Sorry, i do not use lightroom but i'm sure its possible to scale the image first before making any amendments. I'd suggest trying this method and comparing with the img you attached; from my past experience, i've seen a noticeable difference, hopefully you will to. Thanks

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Tejas Khambhayta View Post
      Hello there, scaling the image down will always reduce quality. This can sometimes be used to your advantage, eg when you want to hide some compression/something unwanted etc. However, down-scaling the image always has its drawbacks, as you said, it makes the image less sharp etc. With soft images, you'll find it harder to get a img uploaded successfully here so you may want to change your workflow. What i mean by that is, before doing any adjustments to your picture, i'd suggest to scale it down to 1280px first (this is what I do). Now that you have an image you will be actually able to upload, edit it however you want, this includes adjustment to sharpening (which seems to be your main concern) and other issues the image may have. If you sharpen then scale to 1280px, the image perhaps may seem a fair bit soft - well at least for most of my cases. Sorry, i do not use lightroom but i'm sure its possible to scale the image first before making any amendments. I'd suggest trying this method and comparing with the img you attached; from my past experience, i've seen a noticeable difference, hopefully you will to. Thanks
      Completely wrong. Reducing the image size ONLY reduces the amount of pixels and that's it!! Unless you wnt to print it in large sizes, you won't notice any difference.

      What we see in the photo above is simply a photo completely lacking contrast. You altered the contrast in your editor, but that has nothing to do with resizing the photo.

      Do all your editings in the large size photo, resize it, sharpen it up and save it only once during the whole editing process, at the very end.
      My photos on Flickr www.flickr.com/photos/geridominguez

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      • #4
        Resizing (or the crop tool as I use), does not reduce the quality of the photo at all.
        As LX_A343 says, check your workflow.
        All adjustments should be made on the original format, preferably RAW.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by LX-A343 View Post

          Completely wrong. Reducing the image size ONLY reduces the amount of pixels and that's it!! Unless you wnt to print it in large sizes, you won't notice any difference.

          What we see in the photo above is simply a photo completely lacking contrast. You altered the contrast in your editor, but that has nothing to do with resizing the photo.

          Do all your editings in the large size photo, resize it, sharpen it up and save it only once during the whole editing process, at the very end.
          Apologies for giving some wrong advice, I was only speaking from past experience. Personally speaking, I find it easier to scale then edit. Thank you for passing on the correct info though

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          • #6
            You want to do the resize in photoshop, as it gives you more control. Use the "Image Size" function, set Width and Height accordingly and Resample to Automatic.
            My photo editing guide - updated and improved Feb. 2010
            My Nikon D100,D200,D300, D800, D7200 basic spotting settings guide
            ACIG - the best resource for military aviation information

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            • #7
              If youu use photoshop, please, read this
              https://helpx.adobe.com/ro/photoshop...photoshop.html

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