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  • Lens Vignetting with Sigma 100-400

    Hello everyone,

    I have some vignetting issues with my new Lens (Sigma 100-400 mm /5,0-6,3 DG OS HSM (C)). At f/8 there is still a terrible vignetting visible (see pictures below). With some test pictures I could even see vignetting up to f/13 with the eye and f/18 (!) if I equalized the picture.

    Does anyone have an idea what might be the reason for this?

    I'm also aware of a previous related thread (https://forums.jetphotos.com/forum/a...gnetting-issue). However, in this thread f/8 (or higher numbers) and a Sigma 100-400 lens were part of the solution, not part of the problem.


    Original picture (just the raw developed into a jpg): Picture is taken with a Nikon D800, f/8 and 250 mm focal length. I'm aware it's not cropped as I wanted to show the full effect:

    Click image for larger version

Name:	D-AGWL (7)_jpg 1260.jpg
Views:	202
Size:	393.1 KB
ID:	1103330

    Equalized picture (equalizing in Photoshop; the JP tool will probably look even worse; I know about the multiple dust spots):

    Click image for larger version

Name:	D-AGWL (7)_jpg 1260 equalized.jpg
Views:	178
Size:	623.6 KB
ID:	1103331

    Thanks for any help and best,
    marfi80

  • #2
    Originally posted by marfi80 View Post
    Hello everyone,

    I have some vignetting issues with my new Lens (Sigma 100-400 mm /5,0-6,3 DG OS HSM (C)). At f/8 there is still a terrible vignetting visible (see pictures below). With some test pictures I could even see vignetting up to f/13 with the eye and f/18 (!) if I equalized the picture.

    Does anyone have an idea what might be the reason for this?

    I'm also aware of a previous related thread (https://forums.jetphotos.com/forum/a...gnetting-issue). However, in this thread f/8 (or higher numbers) and a Sigma 100-400 lens were part of the solution, not part of the problem.


    Original picture (just the raw developed into a jpg): Picture is taken with a Nikon D800, f/8 and 250 mm focal length. I'm aware it's not cropped as I wanted to show the full effect:

    Click image for larger version  Name:	D-AGWL (7)_jpg 1260.jpg Views:	6 Size:	393.1 KB ID:	1103330

    Equalized picture (equalizing in Photoshop; the JP tool will probably look even worse; I know about the multiple dust spots):

    Click image for larger version  Name:	D-AGWL (7)_jpg 1260 equalized.jpg Views:	7 Size:	623.6 KB ID:	1103331

    Thanks for any help and best,
    marfi80
    You're going to get some vignetting on no matter what lens you put on a full-frame camera like a D800, and with lower-end zoom lenses like the 100-400 it's going to be even worse. The larger sensor of a full frame needs a much bigger image circle to cover it, and frankly when you try to fit 100-400mm of focal range into a single zoom lens (and a small one at that) there are going to need to be compromises somewhere. One of those areas is light fall off in the corners. I don't think there's anything particularly unusual about what you are seeing; you'll just need to adjust your shooting habits a bit. It might seem odd to see vignetting at f/8, but if the aperture is wide open already at f/5.6, f/8 is only one stop down. It's not at all surprising you'd need to be at f/11 or higher (2+ stops) to see a reduction in the fall off. If you want to shoot at f/8 on a full frame sensor without vignetting, you'll need a brighter lens, at least f/4 or even f/2.8... which of course means much bigger and more expensive. You'll need to decide if the trade off is worth it.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by dlowwa View Post

      and with lower-end zoom lenses like the 100-400 it's going to be even worse
      I agree that the problem here is the camera body being used. Full frame is generally not a great idea with aviation photography as a 100-400mm lens often won't be enough (the 1.5/6 crop factor of APS-C sensors help with this). However, on an APS-C body the Sigma 100-400's performance is far from lower-end, the big catch there is the fact that Sigma were most definitely aware of the fact that this lens will be more popular on crop-sensors rather than full frame when designing it. I shoot Sony and have tried the native Sony 100-400 GM ($3200AUD lens) and found that the performance of the Sigma (even when adapted with the MC-11) was, if anything, better. Although it may have been the copy I was shooting with, the big takeaway for me was the fact that on a larger, more expensive sensor, this lens would work perfectly, because it was designed with full-frame problems (vignette, etc) in mind.

      In general, imo, APS-C sensors are generally far better in terms of cost to performance/satisfactory results compared to full frame when it comes to aviation photography. Especially now that APS-C sensors are getting better and better in resolution (Canon 90D with 32.5MP and the rumoured A7000 with 43MP/8K video), so the ability to crop a lot with high-res full frame sensors like that in the A7RIII and 5DSR because your traditional 100-400 often won't be enough reach is negated.

      Comment


      • #4
        Lens Correction in Lightroom does a very good job correcting this for every lens on the market.


        Comment


        • #5
          Hi marfi80,

          According to Dxomark, the low-light ISO of D800 is 2853, so just try to raise the ISO as countermeasure against the effect of smaller aperture.

          Nikon's Capture NX-D standard setting of vignetting removal may also do the trick.

          Comment


          • #6
            Dear all,

            thank you very much for all of your feedback.

            I get the message that moving to a full-frame camera might not have been the best option here... I understand this as a valuable yet expensive experience when trying to upgrade from some lower-end equipment to something better. Anyway, I will deal with it and all of your hints are very much appreciated. Will try to adjust the shooting habits a bit towards higher f-numbers, maybe checking whether ISO has an effect and try out some ot the lens correction softwares. If all of that doesn't go into the right direction, I'll consider moving to an APS-C body.

            Thanks again and best,
            marfi80

            Comment

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