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  • Vignetting problems

    Good morning fellow photographers, I'm currently having some issues with my camera/lense. Problem is this doesn't happen regularly but randomly, also in good light conditions. My camera is a Nikon D3500 (However I doubt the problem is there), while my lense is a AF-P DX NIKKOR 70-300mm, f/4.5-6.3 ED VR. Here is an example with the equalized version of a photo, with only Adobe Lightroom lense correction already applied to the picture.

    This problem as I stated before, happens randomly even throughout the same day, and some pictures will just report this heavy vignettature. I checked the various settings I used in various photos, however it doesn't really seem to be linked to that: Some photos shot with the same settings turned out differently "vignetting-wise". Also, in the non-equalized version of the picture it is barely noticeable. I generally shoot in aperture mode, with an f/8 and an iso 200. I've tried googling any problems related to this lense and couldn't find anything about it... If anyone has any idea, please let me know I'll appreciate it a lot, otherwise I'll try bringing my camera to my local store and see if there's any problems with it. The thing is I know different people with same equipment and they don't seem to find the same problems. Thanks in advance for the help, Tommaso

  • #2
    On some of the cheaper especially kit lenses vignetting is a problem and is more noticeable at low apertures. If you want to test the lens put it up to F13 and just do a test shot outside to see if it is less noticeable. If there is no change at all there is probably an issue with the lens.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by zwilk18 View Post
      On some of the cheaper especially kit lenses vignetting is a problem and is more noticeable at low apertures. If you want to test the lens put it up to F13 and just do a test shot outside to see if it is less noticeable. If there is no change at all there is probably an issue with the lens.
      I understand and will do, thanks for the head-up. I still don't get how it can only happen in certain times and apparently to me only but oh well, Thanks again

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Tommaso Dal Maso View Post

        I understand and will do, thanks for the head-up. I still don't get how it can only happen in certain times and apparently to me only but oh well, Thanks again
        Very unlikely that this is only happening at "certain times". Almost certainly it is related to either the focal length or aperture setting you are using. You are much more likely to see strong vignetting at a wider aperture or at the longer end of the focal range of your lens.

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        • #5
          If it isn't noticeable unless you EQ the image does it really matter? Equalisation will reveal even the slightest flaw, and EVERY lens without exception is subject to vignetting to some degree.

          What I have found with some modern lenses is that they are largely designed to be used in conjunction with the peripheral illumination feature of a camera. The Canon EF 70-200 f/4 L IS II suffered vignetting far more than its predecessor, but the trade-off was slightly sharper images.

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          • #6
            I used to have the same problem with my D5500 with Sigma 18-300mm F3.5-6.3 DC and Sigma 150-600mm F5-6.3 OS HSM. But the problem were not the lenses, were the camera, really stranger (It used to have also huge halos in the original files). Nowadays the unic way for save a photo (in my case) is using the mode SCENE and there select "Landscape". It is like an Aperture-Priority mode, it sets between F9 and F11, what you can only do is set the iso, but donīt worry, if this tip works for you, you wonīt have problems with this mode, absolutely all my photos on jetphotos are taken in that mode. I hope that it could help you!

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            • #7
              I personally was able to reduce this issue with my Tamron 18-400 when it was my main lens in the day. Typically, I would shoot in low apertures in shutter priority mode which would cause a whole heap of fun issues such as distortion, vignetting, aberration and much more. Nowadays, to avoid this problem on all my lenses I decided to shoot manual. Now this isn't actually that hard to do. What I do now is set the aperture between f8-11 (usually the sharpest range on most lenses) and set auto ISO. From there, you only have to worry about changing the shutter speed so that you can keep a low ISO for good image quality, with anywhere from 1/500 to 1/1000 being useful in the day depending on how bright the day is and the conditions. As you improve and get more confident it becomes easier to manipulate your settings manually, as can be done at night and in low-light conditions. Finally, another problem with superzoom lenses is that when you push towards the high mm end of the lens the optics fall apart. My 18-400 is only usable for my standards up to 200mm before things become a bit rubbish. So yea hope that helps and good luck...

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              • #8
                much also depends on the angle of inclination of the glass with respect to the subject in relation to the position of the sun

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                • #9
                  Tommaso, I have the same lens as you and sometimes run into the same issue. Anything shot at f6.3 or below, I start to get vignetting. I have also noticed my lens is way more susceptible to vignetting when using it on my D750 versus my D3300 (fwiw the D750 is full frame).

                  Fortunately, I have been successful in avoiding it by shooting in manual and keeping the aperture at around f7.1 or f8. You could also try to fix the image by using the lens correction filters in Lightroom/Photoshop or hit the corners with the clone stamp tool.
                  My profile: https://www.jetphotos.com/photographer/110302

                  Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/people/[email protected]/
                  Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/doughertyevan_/

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                  • #10
                    f/6.3 is only a stop above max. aperture at 70mm so it's not surprising that vignetting occurs with such a cheap lens. It's also not surprising that it's much more apparent on a FF camera.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Runway28L View Post
                      Tommaso, I have the same lens as you and sometimes run into the same issue. Anything shot at f6.3 or below, I start to get vignetting. I have also noticed my lens is way more susceptible to vignetting when using it on my D750 versus my D3300 (fwiw the D750 is full frame).

                      Fortunately, I have been successful in avoiding it by shooting in manual and keeping the aperture at around f7.1 or f8. You could also try to fix the image by using the lens correction filters in Lightroom/Photoshop or hit the corners with the clone stamp tool.
                      Hey Evan, thanks for the suggestions. I always shoot between f8/9 and eventually 11 and always use lightroom classic correction filter. Still don't understand the issue with it as I've noticed it happens at various times and different light / apertures / focal lenght... Will look more deeply into it in the coming days - Tommaso

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by mahagonny View Post
                        much also depends on the angle of inclination of the glass with respect to the subject in relation to the position of the sun
                        Thanks Enzo, I think this might be the issue. What makes me think of it is that I've always encountered this problem in my own airport where light is always inclined in relation to the aircraft and myself. Will look into this more, thanks, Tommaso

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by JakTrax View Post
                          If it isn't noticeable unless you EQ the image does it really matter? Equalisation will reveal even the slightest flaw, and EVERY lens without exception is subject to vignetting to some degree.

                          What I have found with some modern lenses is that they are largely designed to be used in conjunction with the peripheral illumination feature of a camera. The Canon EF 70-200 f/4 L IS II suffered vignetting far more than its predecessor, but the trade-off was slightly sharper images.
                          Yes, it's normally not noticeable on the image, but would still get rejected for vignetting as the equalized version of the photo is visible and clearly shows it out. Thanks for the head-up about the modern lenses, Tommaso

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