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JPEG Compression

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  • JPEG Compression

    Quick question:

    How can you tell when too much Jpeg compression has been applied? What is the difference between too much and too little (if there is such thing as too little)?

    I always hear this referenced, I would kinda like to know.

    any info appreciated
    Peeps,
    DLK



  • #2
    If you use Photoshop, upon saving the file as a JPEG you'll be presented with a dialogue box asking you to specify how much compression is used. In 7.0 & CS, the range is from 1-12 I believe, and in 5.0 the range is from 1-10.

    1 = High compression, smallest file size, lowest image quality (manifests itself as 'blocky' pixellation, and 'artefacts' around high contrast detail areas (clouds and colour gradient in sky are good examples of where this occurs).

    12 = Low compression, larger file size, higher image quality. All of the above problems are still there; they are just not as obvious and the eye does not percieve them as clearly.

    Always save at the lowest compression, to give your pictures the best available quality that the jpeg format offers.

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    • #3
      Right

      I know how to save with minimal compression, I use 2.0 and it has 1-12, I always save in 12.

      My question: What is the visual difference between lots of Jpeg Compression and Minimal Jpeg compression?


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      • #4
        ediddy heres an example of wayy to much compression:

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        • #5
          that's IT!

          Chris, that was totally what I was looking for. Thanks.

          Peeps,
          E-Diddy!


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