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Has the quality standard req been increased?

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  • seahawk
    replied
    Originally posted by LX-A343
    So, "Seahawk" is actually your girlfriend?

    Gerardo
    Kind off. She just to lazy to have her own account.

    Leave a comment:


  • Greg Wilson
    replied
    oops

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  • LX-A343
    replied
    So, "Seahawk" is actually your girlfriend?

    Gerardo

    Leave a comment:


  • seahawk
    replied
    Originally posted by Felipe Garcia
    So your gf also likes airplanes?
    After getting used to the hobby yes. She even has some pics taken with the P&S in the databse.

    She really loves going to airshows, but going to the airport for some special planes is also interesting to her.

    This is here most succesfull pic so far

    [photoid=364073]

    Leave a comment:


  • Felipe Garcia
    replied
    Originally posted by seahawk
    Sure, but Iwant to go back to a tool like my beloved Nikon F5 in the days of 35mm film. And the D100, as good as it is, is not there. The D200 has been ordered and with luck I will be one of the first customers in Germany to get one.

    And my girlfriend will no longer be bitching at me that she has to use a Coolpix camera, as she will get the D100 for our spotting trips.
    So your gf also likes airplanes?

    Leave a comment:


  • tsentsan
    replied
    Forgot to mention. With regards to the quality issue on P&S cameras, dont forget the physical sensor size on these babies are WAY smaller than those found in DSLRs.

    Leave a comment:


  • seahawk
    replied
    Originally posted by tsentsan
    Always remember, a camera is only a mere tool. The person using/behind the camera is the one that creates the image. Knowing how to use the tool is probably one of the first steps to creating a create image.
    Sure, but Iwant to go back to a tool like my beloved Nikon F5 in the days of 35mm film. And the D100, as good as it is, is not there. The D200 has been ordered and with luck I will be one of the first customers in Germany to get one.

    And my girlfriend will no longer be bitching at me that she has to use a Coolpix camera, as she will get the D100 for our spotting trips.

    Leave a comment:


  • Pacific
    replied
    We're people who don't believe that one should have to own a $5000 camera
    So we need a $4500 one? :P

    Jokes aside, you can get a good shot with a P&S in good weather. However, it's so much harder to pan with it because of the slow-refreshing LCD as well as shutterlag. You also need to predict the amount of zoom you need in advance when you see the next plane coming in. Or constantly adjust the exposure compensation when the sun goes behind a cloud while people with DSLRs with its excellent sensors can just leave it on "P". I dread to take my P&S back to hazy HKG - grainmania!

    It's just so much harder to take a generic side-on shot of a landing aircraft with a P&S. There is then the limited megapixel available, as well as your shot being more grainy and of inferior quality to a DSLR. The drive for perfection is greater with a P&S and the irony is, it seems harder to get perfection with a P&S due to its slow speed. You really need the plane close to full frame to minimise grain which is so hard to do.

    I'll never get away with taking a picture of a 737 taking up only 50% of the frame, cropping away everything and get the shot accepted at JP with my P&S. I sure did with a 300D though - the quality is simply different (and the price). http://www.jetphotos.net/viewphoto.php?id=408277

    I have an Olympus C-750 and I need to live with it for another couple of years. That thing is living hell sometimes and I still enjoy spotting, what a contradiction!

    I've completely digressed but I think my post illustrates stress levels behind the P&S user.

    Leave a comment:


  • EastMidlands
    replied
    I agree that the quality standard should not go out of the band that us Prosumer/Point and Shoot users are put to a disadvantage, but I maintain my word that with the correct attitude to the Photography, and working with the Photos and always trying to improve everytime you edit or take a Photo, getting Photos on JetPhotos with a Prosumer or a Point and Shoot will remain just as it is now.

    I do not think Chris and his crew will go back on their word on the 'About Us' page.

    EastMidlands

    Leave a comment:


  • clairaig
    replied
    Hi Guys,

    I'm amazed at how long this thread has run for. Thanks to you all for your input.

    The debate about the differences between point and shoot and digital SLR's is interesting. I for one upgraded from an Olympus 750 (great camera BTW) to a 300D because although I was still getting pictures accepted here, I was not happy with the quality myself. Now that I can't blame my equipment for faults I use screeners rejections as opportunities to improve. While I don't always agree with the rejections, I can accept that there is a "Jetphotos standard" (my term) that has to be followed and the screeners job is to train us to work to this.

    Believe it or not screeners, you efforts are appreciated by most of us. Keep up the good work.

    My main reason for starting this thread was because I felt the site was drifting away from it's stated aim. I quote Chris Kilroy on the "about us" page.

    "We're people who live and breathe aviation. We're people who are perfectly content to spend hours on end sitting at the end of an airport runway. We're people who look to the sky whenever the faint sound of jet engines can be heard, squinting into the sun to catch that one glimpse of the marvelous machine flying above our heads.

    We're people who don't believe that one should have to own a $5000 camera, and be a professional photographer, to get their photos accepted into an online airliner photo database. "


    It's good for the site if quality standards improve. But let's not lose sight of what it's about.

    Tony

    Leave a comment:


  • JordanD
    replied
    After I started shooting at the absolute highest resolution possible (besides TIFF) my acceptance ratio has gone up to 64%. I'm using a point and shoot. My point is, know your camera. It's probably a lot better than you think it is.

    Leave a comment:


  • Paul Maier
    replied
    Originally posted by clairaig
    the main feature of Jetphotos in my opinion is that ordinary human beings with affordable cameras can share their hobby with others. I hope the trend here is not going to be that only "perfect" photos get accepted. This site has intoduced some good innovations recently and it would be a shame to spoil them by going the way of some other websites and perhaps discouraging new photographers.

    Any comments anyone?
    I fully agree with the above statement.

    Leave a comment:


  • Crazy764
    replied
    Robin,

    There is no excuse for not editing photos. The parallel you draw with the IT industry makes no sense.

    I have close friends and relatives working in the IT field, and they always have to go back, change, and try to perfect whatever they are working on. Isn't that why there are Beta versions of software?

    It's no different in other fields. Authors have to proofread and edit their books. Artists have to alter and perfect their paintings. And similarly, photographers have to post-process their photos.

    Leave a comment:


  • LX-A343
    replied
    Originally posted by RobinB
    My point EXACTLY - with the kind of money one would spend on a GOOD Digital SLR, in full Auto Mode I would expect a pic that meets acceptance criteria without having to "pretty it up" via editing software. for arguements sake - and the "experiment" i was attempting was to see where the emphasis lies - one's ability to use a camera, or the ability to use an editig suite.
    Sorry, but you're completely wrong!
    1. Auto mode means, that the camera chooses the settings, as the built-in logic thinks would be best. It doesn't know, what DOF you need for example.
    2. Auto Mode doesn't have anything to do with post processing.
    3. A good DSLR produces a good basis picture, i.e. a RAW file, which the photog then can develop to a good photo, depending on requirements as printing, internet, poster, etc.
    4. At least you have to ceonvert the RAW-file to a JPG and resize it to 1024x... (or up to 1600x...). So, you just started to work on the pic. Does the camera know, how you will convert the pic? I don't think so. And there are several ways of converting a pic.
    Compare it to the good old times of analog cameras. A good SLR produced good negatives, not finished prints.

    Gerardo

    Leave a comment:


  • Greg Wilson
    replied
    Robin,
    you can still have fun.............. put your camera on auto and take happy snaps.
    The work done in PS is the same as was done in the dark room.If you know your camera a few clicks is all that is needed.Sure there are ways of saving a borderline pic but once again that was always available in the dark room.Improved editing also means correct crop,level etc.......basic necessities.
    Yes we have given ourselves more work because instead of dropping a couple of rolls of film at Kodak,we now bring it home......added to the fact that because it is digital we shoot with no constraints.What is really being said here is that by the time you have, say 100 pics on the DB a photographers rejections should be low on at least bog standard shots.Sadly I see uploaders having the same rejection over and over.

    Leave a comment:

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