Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

DSLR's?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • DSLR's?

    At the moment, I have a 3.2 mpx Canon PowerShot A510 which I use for my photos. Its just a point and shoot camera, and I so far have 2 photos in the DB, but I was wondering if I should upgrade my camera to a DSLR? Do you think that it would be necessary to get good shots, and if so, what camera would you recommend?

  • #2
    Well getting good shots all comes down to your skill as a photographer. The camera you use only has a little to do with it. You can have the best 12 megapixel SLR and still get crappy pictures.
    All that aside what's your budget? I think the Nikon D50 is going for around 5-600 USD now, not bad. But a good camera won't mean crap without a good lens. The lens really plays the biggest part I'd say.

    Comment


    • #3
      500-600 would probably be tops for this one.

      Comment


      • #4
        I, myself am using a 4 MP camera (point and shoot) and have always wanted to upgrade to a DSLR. I'm saving up. (so it may take me until the year 2035 ) After months of research, I have found that the Canon 10D is a very good camera and the photo quality is pretty comparable to that of the 20D. You can only get one used though, because they are discontinued, for about $450-600 USD, depending on if you want the basic lense or not.

        http://www.youtube.com/DC3Vette - playing guitar

        Comment


        • #5
          So maybe I should just stick it out with my A510 then?

          Comment


          • #6
            Dslr

            Yes, I went through this scenario myself - most of my early pics on JP were shot with a 2mpixel Fuji which had a 6 x optical lens - the Fuji was stolen and (insurance) replaced with a Panasonic FZ2 whch had a 12 x optical lens. I have recently upgraded to the Canon 350d with the 18-55 lens and bought the Sigma 70-300 lens.

            As mentioned in this post and many similar, it's what and how you use the said camera is what counts - DSLR just gives you more options and control over your shooting. I am still learning how to REALLY use the 350d - I certainly found the 350d the best value for money DSLR for my needs.
            RobB

            Comment


            • #7
              OK, thanks for your advice. On my camera, you can add a conversion ring, and add such things as a telephoto cpnvertor, and so on. Maybe it would be better to invest in these before moving up?

              Comment


              • #8
                I have to agree with Jordan....You can have te best setup in the world, but if the skill and attention to detail isn't there, it's useless.



                "Sorry Goose, but it's time to buzz the tower!"


                Comment


                • #9
                  I agree you don't need a DSLR to take good photos of aircraft (though it certainly has advantages), but a x3 optical zoom is awfully limiting. As an alternative to a DSLR I would suggest something like the Canon S2 or S3.

                  Charles


                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Though I am barely a photographer, I do have something to add-While it's true that a good camera doesn't mean an instantly great photographer, the camera may limit the photographer. I don't know how the 510's controls are, but a lot of p+s's are poor in the manual control department... I would suggest moving toward a better quality P+S...it may be bad advice, but it is what I evaluate as the best current move.
                    My $.02 (which, like the monetary value, is worth almost nothing ),
                    A.M.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Star Alliance
                      Though I am barely a photographer, I do have something to add-While it's true that a good camera doesn't mean an instantly great photographer, the camera may limit the photographer. I don't know how the 510's controls are, but a lot of p+s's are poor in the manual control department... I would suggest moving toward a better quality P+S...it may be bad advice, but it is what I evaluate as the best current move.
                      My $.02 (which, like the monetary value, is worth almost nothing ),
                      A.M.
                      At least you know your advice aint worth much

                      Anyways, Ill mainly re-iterate what you just said, a move to a better P&S may be a better option for you, it depends on how you want to shoot. If all your going to do with your camera is run out to the airport with it spending more on a DSLR cant probably be justified. If you want to get into photography a DSLR may be better but if you fall out with it 2 months later its not money well spent. There are plenty of P&S' that will get you satisfactory results that can be purchased relatively cheaply.
                      Sam Rudge
                      A 5D3, some Canon lenses, the Sigma L and a flash

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Quite a bit here, but I hope it helps. Lets assume that you are reasonably OK handling the controls of whaterver camera you have, dSLR / P&S.

                        A lot depends on your style of photography, and ultimately what you wish to do with the image, how much you want to spend, how much post work you want to do.

                        A point and shoot will generally have less options. Either the shot "arrives" or it doesn't, but you don't miss shots while making decisions or changing lens, you don't get dust on the sensor, and you have less gear to carry around.

                        For web site presentation the file size does not have to be that big, infact getting big files down to small sizes can generate a new set of issues in itself.

                        Most P&S images come out of the camera looking good and a final "auto adjust" and some sharpening produces good quality prints to a modest size and with some further tweaking solid web ready images. The file sizes are smallish, manipulate reasonably quickly and don't take up to much storage space.

                        dSLR will highlight any tecnique errors much more than a P&S and this generally increases with expence because as you increase pixels on any given sensor you increase the amount of softness through not having the camera very steady and also increase noise. Also more chance of having a setting wrong.

                        So after saying that, why do I own an upper end dSLR and various lens. Firstly I use them for a whole range of photography which requires the extra functions, different lens, controlled lighting etc. 95% of aerophotgraphy uses a very small amount of the high end funtions, shutterspeeds, and I often have everything manual.

                        The bigger the file size / lens quality does allow more cropping, but these files do generally require more post processing (many people are very disapointed with the images that come straight out of the camera) and with larger files it will take longer and they eat up hard drive spave very quickly.

                        Ultimately the difference in quality starts to show not on the web, (a bit like putting a F1 car and a mondeo on the motorway and saying which will be the best drive!) but when prints are made, especially bigger prints, like posters.

                        However if your taking good composition with a P&S and your technique is good, or you work at strengthening any weaknesses, a dSLR will create more capture flexibility, you have or can obtain some processing software and are excited about exploring what it can do, then your prints will be of a better quality size 4 size.

                        Cameras in the D70 (new nikon about to launch so expect used prices to drop) Canon 350, D20 D30 are very popular here used with a zome lens 70 - 200 or 300 range. They produce medium sized files, that manipulate quickly and look great on the web and will produce, if not cropped too tight, really nice decent sized images.

                        Cameras like the D200, D2x Canon 5D and Eos 1mk11ds will produce huge, stunning prints, equal or better? than a 35mm film camera, but generally require much more disclipline, good technique and post software and when making big images, the knowledge of how to use it.

                        But here is a point that I do make when comparing digital cameras. If you took two film cameras of a few years ago, say a Nikon F301 and the F4, connected the same lens and used the same film, for most aero pictures it would be tricky to tell which camera produced which one as the cameras ultimately then thingy in the middle that got the lens image onto the film.

                        But with a digital cameras things are not so equal, and a D2X and an d50 will not produce the same image by anymeans because digital SLRs are in addition to light collectors, more importantly the digital film as well, and the sensor will have the final say in a huge amount of what the image will ultimately do.

                        Happy shopping

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Pentax have recently released their IST DX which is a 6.1 mpixel with an 18 - 55 lens as part of the kit. Search Altavista for Pentax digital slr and take the Amazon option. There are reviews from owners there.

                          Price is 355 'ish with the lens. You will need to get an SD card as it seems that one is not included. On your budget you should be able to afford a Sigma 70 - 300 or similar to go with it. Older Pentax lenses from the film camera range will also work with it.

                          Its worth a look, especially at the price.

                          STOP PRESS>>>>>>>>> Ignore me, it's been discontinued.<<<<<<<<<<<<

                          A Nikon D70 or D70S would be a better bet, but wait a while as the D70 price is bound to fall soon when Nikon introduce their 10+ mpixel new range.
                          Last edited by brianw999; 2006-07-22, 15:41.
                          If it 'ain't broken........ Don't try to mend it !

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Star Alliance
                            Though I am barely a photographer, I do have something to add-While it's true that a good camera doesn't mean an instantly great photographer, the camera may limit the photographer. I don't know how the 510's controls are, but a lot of p+s's are poor in the manual control department... I would suggest moving toward a better quality P+S...it may be bad advice, but it is what I evaluate as the best current move.
                            My $.02 (which, like the monetary value, is worth almost nothing ),
                            A.M.
                            You're right to some extent. But DSLRS only really work if you know what you're doing.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Star Alliance: I do have something to add-While it's true that a good camera doesn't mean an instantly great photographer, the camera may limit the photographer.
                              Exactly. Having a P+S greatly limits what can be done, even if you have totally mastered the camera. If it is an underperforming camera, there is basically nothing you can do about it. Even if you take the most perfect picture possible (with a P+S), the performance and quality will still never be up to par with the bigger leagues.

                              http://www.youtube.com/DC3Vette - playing guitar

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X