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  • #16
    I'd definitely not recommend using an air blower to clean a sensor from dust. My experience with it is bad and I came to the conclusion that it's useless unless you only want to clean only your lenses from dust. It only removes part of it, plus you don't get rid of that removed dust as it remains in the camera itself. Once I used the air blower and somehow it contained moisture with dust in it ! Instead of removing the dust it applied a myriad of dust over my sensor.

    After thinking to get the job done by Canon I decided to clean the sensor myself. I use a swab and a couple of Eclipse drops (Methanol). The first time I did I wasn't comfortable but now I'm used to it and very happy with the results. No need to use that "heal" tool on PS anymore.
    My pics on JetPhotos.net & flickr.com

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    • #17
      Yeah - where can you get it done for 15 in London?

      It cost me 60 for my D1X and 40 for my D70 (same day service though) Both have not had the lens off since, the D1X had dust again almost straightaway though the D70 is holding up OK at the moment (death warrant now!)

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      • #18
        I've come to the conclusion that Canon's 100-400 is a major contributor to dust problems on current Canons. I had major dust problems in my early 20D days, but since a good clean and switching to a twist lens dust suddenly doesn't seem a big problem at all.
        I still get dust but i don't have to clean it half as much as i used to with the 100-400, which just sucks dust straight into the chamber. I've only recently got a rocket blower as it came as part of a cleaning kit i bought. It's effective for getting rid of single large specks, but nothing beats a proper "wet" clean.

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        • #19
          My esperiences are, that the 20D is far more prone to dust, than my trusty D60. I cleaned my D60 about 10 months ago and I didn't have a single dust spot anymore, not even using the 100-400 with it!!! The 20D is "a bit different": I have to clean it before every single photoshooting, but I'm getting used to it.
          My photos on Flickr www.flickr.com/photos/geridominguez

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          • #20
            Originally posted by LX-A343
            My esperiences are, that the 20D is far more prone to dust, than my trusty D60. I cleaned my D60 about 10 months ago and I didn't have a single dust spot anymore, not even using the 100-400 with it!!! The 20D is "a bit different": I have to clean it before every single photoshooting, but I'm getting used to it.
            My Pentax is really prone to spots... They come out from nowhere.... Took her for cleaning, and the spots are already getting slowly visibile...

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            • #21
              Originally posted by B7772ADL
              but nothing beats a proper "wet" clean.
              Totally agree, I must add for any 400D users, since completely disabling "Auto Sensor Cleaning" I have'nt had too many spots to deal with, it has made a huge difference turning it off.

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              • #22
                I wet clean my sensor with a sensor swab as I would go bankrupt if I had to pay $40 everytime there is dust on it. Important thing to remember is that you are not actually touching the sensor, you are cleaning the sensor protector. When using air to clean the sensor you only get rid of large loose specs, anything that clings to the CCD will stay there. Also, if applying to high air pressure might lead to specs being trapped under the protector and then you really have to get it serviced.


                I have found this webpage very helpful, read and learn

                http://www.cleaningdigitalcameras.com/

                Johnny

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