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Is there any hope of getting rid of halos for Nikon users?

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  • Is there any hope of getting rid of halos for Nikon users?


    I shoot with a Nikon D3400 and for as long as I've used the camera, I've had to deal with halos. They're extremely annoying and ruin a big majority of my pictures. I've tried turning off active D-lighting (this picture was taken with D-lighting off), but it hasn't worked. I don't use the highlight or shadow tools when editing as they only make the pictures worse. I'm wondering if there's something wrong with the exposures or if there's anything else I can do to minimize halos. Also is there any free editing software that can remove halos? Any advice is appreciated. Thanks!

  • #2
    Originally posted by Jordan Louie View Post
    [ATTACH=CONFIG]14434[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]14435[/ATTACH]
    I shoot with a Nikon D3400 and for as long as I've used the camera, I've had to deal with halos. They're extremely annoying and ruin a big majority of my pictures. I've tried turning off active D-lighting (this picture was taken with D-lighting off), but it hasn't worked. I don't use the highlight or shadow tools when editing as they only make the pictures worse. I'm wondering if there's something wrong with the exposures or if there's anything else I can do to minimize halos. Also is there any free editing software that can remove halos? Any advice is appreciated. Thanks!
    If you've turned off D-lighting then something else in your workflow is causing it. The simplest solution is process a jpeg from the raw file, with everything except white balance set to zero. Edit the jpeg from that point, and there should be no halos unless you introduce them. I use Nikon as well, and have never had an issue with halos, so it shouldn't be that difficult of a problem to fix.

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    • #3
      Are you shooting in a scene mode? I'm kind of shooting from the hip here, but I suppose it is possible that a scene mode is overriding one of you settings and that's causing the halos.
      [SIGNATURE GOES HERE]

      Felipe Garcia

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      • #4
        Originally posted by dlowwa View Post
        If you've turned off D-lighting then something else in your workflow is causing it. The simplest solution is process a jpeg from the raw file, with everything except white balance set to zero. Edit the jpeg from that point, and there should be no halos unless you introduce them. I use Nikon as well, and have never had an issue with halos, so it shouldn't be that difficult of a problem to fix.
        I agree with Dana. When I used my Nikon I shooted in raw. I only got halo's when i overprocessed, for instance applying too much noise reduction in photoshop

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        • #5
          Hi, I used to have halos in all my pictures when I was using Capture NX-D before PS. I stopped using Capture NX-D and I use only raw reader in PS then edit in PS, the halo disappeared. In my case this was related to the software I was using. Of course if the image is overprocessed you will see some halos, Hope this helps.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by dlowwa View Post
            If you've turned off D-lighting then something else in your workflow is causing it. The simplest solution is process a jpeg from the raw file, with everything except white balance set to zero. Edit the jpeg from that point, and there should be no halos unless you introduce them. I use Nikon as well, and have never had an issue with halos, so it shouldn't be that difficult of a problem to fix.
            Okay, I will try that. Although I'm not sure what in my workflow would cause halos since I don't try to adjust highlights and shadows.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Jordan Louie View Post
              Okay, I will try that. Although I'm not sure what in my workflow would cause halos since I don't try to adjust highlights and shadows.
              Well, something is causing them, as I guarantee they won't be there in an untouched RAW file. I don't use Capture NX-D, but probably there is a default setting in that software (or whatever you are using) which may not be obvious, but is actually causing the halos.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by dlowwa View Post
                Well, something is causing them, as I guarantee they won't be there in an untouched RAW file. I don't use Capture NX-D, but probably there is a default setting in that software (or whatever you are using) which may not be obvious, but is actually causing the halos.
                Will keep checking settings. Thanks.

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                • #9
                  The clarity slider in Adobe Camera Raw (ACR) can cause halos if used too much. Perhaps it's that?

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                  • #10
                    The photo doesn't look like the clarity slider was used though, unless the ACR clarity slider works different than the one on Lightroom. I do agree with you, usually anything beyond 15-20% can start to cause undesirable effects.

                    Jordan,

                    What shooting mode are you using? If you're using a scene or auto mode, shoot on Av for a day and see if the photos have the same effects.
                    [SIGNATURE GOES HERE]

                    Felipe Garcia

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                    • #11
                      That's true Felipe. It's hard to tell. The only solution is for Jordan to pick an image, and when editing it, equalise it at every step to try and identify what editing process is causing the halos.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Mr Chips View Post
                        That's true Felipe. It's hard to tell. The only solution is for Jordan to pick an image, and when editing it, equalise it at every step to try and identify what editing process is causing the halos.
                        That's probably the best way to do it, actually.
                        [SIGNATURE GOES HERE]

                        Felipe Garcia

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                        • #13
                          for jpgs:

                          Do not use a scene mode, turn D-Lighting off and in Picture control settings use, standard with Clarity set to 0.
                          My photo editing guide - updated and improved Feb. 2010
                          My Nikon D100,D200,D300, D800, D7200 basic spotting settings guide
                          ACIG - the best resource for military aviation information

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