Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

I have a prayer to do.

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • I have a prayer to do.

    Hi to all
    My rejections, except for some soft, are now just too much or too little contrast.
    I read in another 3D a proposal to offer uploaders a tool that allows to evaluate, according to the standard of JP, if a picture is of proper contrast or, alternatively, to split this reason for rejection, in too much and little contrast .
    This proposal seems to me good, even to avoid weighing down the queue with photos that would be rejected.
    Sorry for my bad english.

  • #2
    Hi,
    I had also rejections about contrast, in 95% I think it is a lack of contrast.
    Avoid to upload pictures taken in gloomy weather, than I think if you edit the photos well the acceptance rate would be higher.
    Have a look at this photo,https://www.jetphotos.com/viewqueued_b.php?id=6900498, histogramm is ok, but the sky behind the buildings is white.
    Therfore a very dull sky not the right light. The reason not enough contrast.
    Greetings, George.

    Comment


    • #3
      I think the photo is also backlit.
      I happen to photograph with dark sky or white, but also photos with good sky or sky (eg on the runway or on APRON) are often rejected by contrast.
      I really have not figured out how to adjust this yet.
      However, a tool similar to dust control could be good.
      Hi George

      Comment


      • #4
        This might help ?

        https://forums.jetphotos.com/showthr...l=1#post626354
        If it 'ain't broken........ Don't try to mend it !

        Comment


        • #5
          Tanks Brian
          I had already read that 3D, but nevertheless it did not help to clarify my ideas.
          P.S. the link does not work

          Comment


          • #6
            Bugger ! I didn’t notice the broken link. The important bit though concerning contrast is setting the ends of the graph by removing the spaces on the baseline.
            If it 'ain't broken........ Don't try to mend it !

            Comment


            • #7
              I did not understand. Are you referring, perhaps to the points indicated by the arrows?
              Click image for larger version

Name:	Schermata-2018-11-15-alle-09.08.58.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	5.0 KB
ID:	1031385

              Comment


              • #8
                Even the histogram is not always helpful. Say in the pic you have some green bush very close to you and then the plane much further away and in the fog. If you are cose enough to the bush, your histogram can still be fine, while the plane is still in the fog.
                My photo editing guide - updated and improved Feb. 2010
                My Nikon D100,D200,D300, D800, D7200 basic spotting settings guide
                ACIG - the best resource for military aviation information

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by mahagonny View Post
                  I did not understand. Are you referring, perhaps to the points indicated by the arrows?
                  [ATTACH=CONFIG]19878[/ATTACH]
                  Yes, those spaces at each end on the baseline of the graph are almost certainly an indication of your contrast problem. Are you using Photoshop? Your attachment is too small to see. If you are then this is the bit that you need to pay attention to...

                  In Photoshop CS, when you are adjusting the histogram for brightness and contrast (and you will often see a comment in the forum or in a rejection to "check and adjust the luminosity histogram" when you get a Dark/Under and/or Contrast rejection, especially from me) then you should be using the luminosity histogram rather than the default RGB histogram that you see when you go to Image....Adjustments....Levels .

                  ......................................

                  The luminosity histogram can be found in "Window....Histogram". Select this option and park it in a corner of the screen. Click the middle tab named Histogram and using the drop down find and select Luminosity.
                  You cannot work directly on this histogram.....

                  ...so now you need to go to "Image....Adjustments....Levels" where you can make adjustments. Make sure that you have RGB selected here. You will see three arrows on the baseline of the graph. The left side arrow adjusts the dark tones, the middle arrow adjusts the midtones and the right arrow adjusts the highlights.

                  You might also see that the two graphs are a different shape and may well have different gaps at each end. These gaps indicate missing dark and light tones depending on which end of the graph they are at. You need to drag the relevant arrow in to touch the graph where it meets the baseline. Make the adjustments on the RGB graph but watch the effect on the Luminosity graph. Setting the left and right side of the luminosity histogram will set optimum contrast. You may have to adjust the midtones as well especially if you have deep shadows or bright highlights but this is a personal judgement for you to make.

                  So, remember, when you process use the Luminosity Histogram to set optimum brightness and contrast.
                  Last edited by brianw999; 2018-11-15, 10:00.
                  If it 'ain't broken........ Don't try to mend it !

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    ok tnks Brian.
                    Yes I use photoshop CC 2018 but I think the steps are the same. I will try to apply this method as soon as I understand it well.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Hi;

                      What is helpful is to get an experienced member to edit one of your photos and have them walk you though the steps. This will help in identifying if the problem is the image or your editing.

                      Feel free to message me if you would like me to edit a photo.

                      Best regards,
                      Jeremy

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by jeremydando View Post
                        Hi;

                        What is helpful is to get an experienced member to edit one of your photos and have them walk you though the steps. This will help in identifying if the problem is the image or your editing.

                        Feel free to message me if you would like me to edit a photo.

                        Best regards,
                        Jeremy
                        Thanks Jeremy, I'm a tough head and I have to figure it out myself

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Despite following Brian's suggestions, the problem is still present. It's really frustrating not to come up with it. I'm reading dozens of articles and seeing vido-tutorial, but I can not solve, or better, to understand how to use the information to be good to JP.
                          This is one of last
                          https://www.jetphotos.com/viewqueued_b.php?id=6936999
                          Have a nice weekend

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by mahagonny View Post
                            Despite following Brian's suggestions, the problem is still present. It's really frustrating not to come up with it. I'm reading dozens of articles and seeing vido-tutorial, but I can not solve, or better, to understand how to use the information to be good to JP.
                            This is one of last
                            https://www.jetphotos.com/viewqueued_b.php?id=6936999
                            Have a nice weekend
                            That's a classic. No tutorial will ever show you, how you can make a properly lit photo starting with a photo taken in miserable light conditions, resulting in a white aircraft with uniform light grey background.
                            My photos on Flickr www.flickr.com/photos/geridominguez

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Oh yes. it was only to reiterate that the problem of too much ..... remains a mystery almost irresolvable to me

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X