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Photography in the cockpit

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  • Photography in the cockpit

    Hey all, Iím looking fo some advice,

    I regularly find myself in the cockpit of various aircraft (especially as Iím training as a commercial pilot and hold a private liscence) however as of current I havenít quite learnt or worked out the best manual settings (F-Stop, Shutter and ISO) to use when in the flight deck of an aircraft whether it be a Cessna or a larger Boeing, I have tried and failed in the past using the automatic settings on my DSLR with often blurry or dark outcomes,

    Any imput or advice is fully appreciated!

    (I use a Canon 7D MK1 if itís of any help)

    Kindest Regards,

    Jordan

  • #2
    Originally posted by Jordan Williams View Post
    Hey all, I’m looking fo some advice,

    I regularly find myself in the cockpit of various aircraft (especially as I’m training as a commercial pilot and hold a private liscence) however as of current I haven’t quite learnt or worked out the best manual settings (F-Stop, Shutter and ISO) to use when in the flight deck of an aircraft whether it be a Cessna or a larger Boeing, I have tried and failed in the past using the automatic settings on my DSLR with often blurry or dark outcomes,

    Any imput or advice is fully appreciated!

    (I use a Canon 7D MK1 if it’s of any help)

    Kindest Regards,

    Jordan
    From reading what other photographers have done in the past, as well as talking to some pilots, generally most people would take a photo outside the flight deck window, and then take the shutter speed, f stop & ISO for that photo and then use the same settings for the flight deck shot but use a flashgun to light up the flightdeck. Hope this helps.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by VH-ROB View Post
      From reading what other photographers have done in the past, as well as talking to some pilots, generally most people would take a photo outside the flight deck window, and then take the shutter speed, f stop & ISO for that photo and then use the same settings for the flight deck shot but use a flashgun to light up the flightdeck. Hope this helps.
      Awesome that most certainly does and also seems like quite a cool technique! I’ll give it a try in the future! Thanks for the advice!

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      • #4
        With camera technology where it¬ís at today it¬ís much easier to take decent cockpit photos than it was before. The dynamic range and high iso performance are so good now comparatively. There¬ís not going be a ¬ďperfect set of settings¬Ē as every situation you encounter in the flight deck will be comparatively different. I would try to avoid flash as much as possible as not a fan of the direct light plus it blanks the EFIS. My recommendation would be shoot raw and try and get as much of a neutral exposure as possible whereby you can both bring up the shadows (inside) and reduce highlights (outside) as much as possible without a detrimental effect to the overall photo.

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        • #5
          Fill flash is the way to go here. To avoid harsh shadows use a bounce board, bounce off the roof or a diffuser bag on the flash head. Expose for outside to obtain a balanced image. There is nothing worse than a blown out exterior which is guaranteed to be rejected for overexposed. These shots show the required result....

          https://www.jetphotos.com/photo/7209196

          https://www.jetphotos.com/photo/6414650

          Both were shot using a diffuser bag over the flash head..... less than £2 from Jessops ! The first shot used the on camera flash ( I didn’thave My SB600 flashgun with me ) which has thrown a shadow of the 18-135 lens. The second used my SB600 flashgun with the Jessops diffuser bag. https://www.jessops.com/p/jessops/un...CABEgLEbPD_BwE
          Last edited by brianw999; 2018-11-23, 14:04.
          If it 'ain't broken........ Don't try to mend it !

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          • #6
            I guess it comes down to personal preference, I’m not a fan of the flash as demonstrated above, and especially so when airborne in a glass cockpit.

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            • #7
              Thanks both of you for all your help! I think I’m going to try all techniques suggested in practice in my car and from there find what will work best for me. Also Thanks for the diffuser bag suggestion, will look at purchasing one very shortly.

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