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Which is a better lens for night spotting?

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  • Which is a better lens for night spotting?

    Hello, I would like to invest on a new lens for spotting. I'm confused between Canon 70-200 F4L ii IS or Tamron 70-200 F2.8 VC G2. I'm wondering if F2.8 is really necessary for night photography, but at the same time I rarely did a night spotting. And for years I would like to own a Canon L lens, anyone can help me make my decision of saying which is the better choice and why? Thanks

  • #2
    Originally posted by danielou_shots View Post
    Hello, I would like to invest on a new lens for spotting. I'm confused between Canon 70-200 F4L ii IS or Tamron 70-200 F2.8 VC G2. I'm wondering if F2.8 is really necessary for night photography, but at the same time I rarely did a night spotting. And for years I would like to own a Canon L lens, anyone can help me make my decision of saying which is the better choice and why? Thanks
    f2.8 would be best for night spotting

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    • #3
      It dépends what you are callin night spotting.
      If you're talking about dusk , when the light is going down, then you may need an aperture like f/2.8, but remember: the greater is the aperture value, the lesser is the deep of field. You'd better go for a DSLR wih high iso capability.

      If you're talking about complete night, then the is no need of a great aperture: the recipe for night photo is simple: tripod, 100iso and several seconds for the exposure time.

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      • #4
        My only truly night shoot was at RAF Northolt. I used a good solid tripod, aperture priority, ISO 100 and f8. A remote Bluetooth shutter release ensured no camera shake. Lens was a Nikon 18-135 but lens choice really comes down to the zoom range that you require.

        https://www.jetphotos.com/showphotos...d&sort-order=0
        Last edited by brianw999; 2019-05-20, 16:07.
        If it 'ain't broken........ Don't try to mend it !

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        • #5
          You don't necessarily need a 2.8 lens for night spotting. I've used F4 lenses mounted on tripods and remote shutter release with good effect.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by B7772ADL View Post
            You don't necessarily need a 2.8 lens for night spots. I've used F4 lenses mounted on tripods and remote shutter release with good effect.
            Preferably a low aperture like what the others have said (nothing above f5.6 at the most). However, its not just the lens. You need a camera which can handle well under low light. I find full frame sensors to handle better than crops under low light (allows more light in), but I'm sure your camera would be fine.

            But if the aircraft is stationary, than i would use about f/8 and iso 200 or so. And let the camera decide what my SS is.

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            • #7
              It depends on the circumstances. At 2.8 your depth of field becomes small and depending on the distance between you and the subject, parts of the plane might be out of focus. So for non-moving subjects a tripod and F8 is preferable.

              If we are talking about moving subjects 2.8 gives you more light and allows you to either have a faster shutter time or use a lower ISO setting.
              My photo editing guide - updated and improved Feb. 2010
              My Nikon D100,D200,D300, D800, D7200 basic spotting settings guide
              ACIG - the best resource for military aviation information

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