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  • mirrorless camera for spotting...???

    What do you think about it and who uses one? Thinking about making a switch..coming from a D610 and the 80-400mm afs.
    Thanks for the comments already.

  • #2
    Originally posted by marc1201 View Post
    What do you think about it and who uses one? Thinking about making a switch..coming from a D610 and the 80-400mm afs.
    Thanks for the comments already.
    Ive never tried using a mirroless camera for spotting, because my Panasonic G7 doesn't have a lens long enough. However I would think that It would work just as well if not smoother than a DSLR. But I would like to hear the opinion from a spotter who uses a MSLR.

    I use the D810 with a 100-400mm.

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    • #3
      Sony's mirrorless line is pretty extensive. If you want full frame you could go with the a7, a7r, a7ii, a7rii, a7iii, a7riii, a9. The APS-C sensors are pretty convenient as well (size wise), I currently use an a6000, but I want to get the a6500 (more af points.) The nice thing about sonys are that the EVF has a histogram.

      In terms of lenses, they have a pretty good selection, although they are more expensive than their Nikon and Canon counterparts.
      600mm f4 (just released) 12k
      200-600 f5.6-6.3 (just released) 2k
      100-400 f4.5-5.6 2.5k
      70-300 f4.5-5.6 1.1k
      70-200 f2.8 2.5k
      70-200 f4 1.5 k
      400 f2.8 12k
      55-210 f4.5-6.3 350usd
      18-200 f3.5-6.3 899usd
      etc.

      They have a fairly wide selection of prime lenses as well. Good thing about sonys are that they use a single mount, E mount, and you can use a lens on any sony body. (it will be cropped though if you use a full frame lens on an apsc sensor and vice versa)
      Best things in my opinion is the compact size of the body itself, the EVF, and on the more expensive bodies, the amount of features.

      Comment


      • #4
        I use only 4/3 format mirrorless (Panasonic and Olympus).

        They offer a lot of services DSLR cannot physically offer (full information and actual image from sensor in viewfinder, burst with constant display, focus peaking, stacking, and many functions mirror makes impossible, etc, etc, etc, etc...). And extraordinary five axis sensor stabilisations winning 5 or 6 stops (You can shoot 2sec with no blur)...

        "Pro" series" lenses (Leica or Olympus, with the same mount) are pretty good, half of the size, 1/4 of the weight and 1/10 of the price, up to 800mm FF equivalent.

        @meeshboi : you can use a Leica 100-400 (FF eq. 200-800, about $1300...) on your G7 (a little bit old fashioned : try a G9 with a much better sensor...). A G9 with this lens is <25 cm and 1kg...

        If you absolutely want a Full Frame (However, except very high ISO's (same as APSc) 4/3 sensors make a great job) : Panasonic (the pioneer of mirrorless, with dedicated Leica or Sigma lenses), Sony with Sony, Sigma or Tamron lenses, Canon and Nikon (all mounts with adaptors or dedicated new lenses).

        @marc1201 : If you use a 80-400 FF, you'll find a very good 50-200 Leica for 4/3 mount.


        Whatever happens, DSLR's are going to disappear from the market within two years...

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        • #5
          Originally posted by zomeu View Post
          I use only 4/3 format mirrorless (Panasonic and Olympus).

          They offer a lot of services DSLR cannot physically offer (full information and actuel image in viewfinder, burst with constant display, focus peaking, stacking, and many functions mirror makes impossible, etc, etc, etc, etc...). And extraordinary five axis sensor stabilisations winning 5 or 6 stops (You can shoot 2sec with no blur)...

          "Pro" series" lenses (Leica or Olympus, with the same mount) are pretty good, half of the size, 1/4 of the weight and 1/10 of the price, up to 800mm FF equivalent.

          @meeshboi : you can use a Leica 100-400 (FF eq. 200-800, about $1300...) on your G7 (a little bit old fashioned : try a G9 with a much better sensor...). A G9 with this lens is <25 cm and 1kg...

          If you absolutely want a Full Frame (However, except very high ISO's (same as APSc) 4/3 sensors make a great job) : Panasonic (the pioneer of mirrorless, with dedicated Leica or Sigma lenses), Sony with Sony, Sigma or Tamron lenses, Canon and Nikon (all mounts with adaptors or dedicated new lenses).

          @marc1201 : If you use a 80-400 FF, you'll find a very good 50-200 Leica for 4/3 mount.


          Whatever happens, DSLR's are going to disappear from the market within two years...
          Really? I sincerely doubt!!! Mirrorless will gain a lot of market share, but DSLR's will stay a bit longer than just 2 years.

          What do you mean with this here: "If you absolutely want a Full Frame (However, except very high ISO's (same as APSc) 4/3 sensors make a great job) ". If I want a Full Frame, then I should go for a 4/3? Or am I misunderstanding anything here?
          My photos on Flickr www.flickr.com/photos/geridominguez

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          • #6
            Canon (I don't know for Nikon) doesn't plan to develop new DSLR models any longer.
            Amortization of the current range will progressively lead to production shutdown.

            There was once the same debate between film and digital...


            I mean : in mirrorless, either you chose 4/3 (APS doesn't exist), which makes a good job except in very high ISO's (>6400 or 12800) or you want absolutely a FF (without the weight-size-price 4/3's benefits (very great benefits when you're over sixty-four, thanks Mr. McCartney)) and you can chose between Pana, Sony, Canon an Nikon. Canon and Nikon users can (great advantage) keep their DSLR lenses with an adaptor.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by zomeu View Post
              Canon (I don't know for Nikon) doesn't plan to develop new DSLR models any longer.
              Amortization of the current range will progressively lead to production shutdown.

              There was once the same debate between film and digital...


              I mean : in mirrorless, either you chose 4/3 (APS doesn't exist), which makes a good job except in very high ISO's (>6400 or 12800) or you want absolutely a FF (without the weight-size-price 4/3's benefits (very great benefits when you're over sixty-four, thanks Mr. McCartney)) and you can chose between Pana, Sony, Canon an Nikon. Canon and Nikon users can (great advantage) keep their DSLR lenses with an adaptor.
              There are tons of APS mirrorless cameras: Fuji (the brand I would go with), Sony, Canon.
              My photos on Flickr www.flickr.com/photos/geridominguez

              Comment


              • #8
                To be fair there is already enough capable mirrorless tech out there to suit almost any spotter's needs, whatever the brand.

                After having used a friend's Sony A7 III to get a taste, what I genuinely despise is the ultra unnatural feel of the EVF and I definitely cannot imagine myself spotting moving aircraft using the large screen on the back. Of course my comments come down only to personal preferences and this is why my sole advice is try to use a mirrorless for the task before spending any funds.

                On the other hand, features as increased burst rates, extraordinary stabilization of some models as well as iconic low light (very low noise on high ISO) performace of Sony's sensors keep tickling my mind when processing future gear upgrade scenarios.

                Don't know, I have a slight feeling I will be sticking to DSLR's until they seize being a choice and hopefully mirrorless tech that allures me today becomes cheaper...

                Comment


                • #9
                  I see there are a number of spotters already using the EOS R. I also am not a fan of the EVF, but I suppose in about 2-3 years from now I will switch to whatever Canon's next R-line model is, since that's probably going to be their R&D focus and I've got quite a few Canon lenses already.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by meeshboi View Post
                    Ive never tried using a mirroless camera for spotting, because my Panasonic G7 doesn't have a lens long enough.
                    The 50-200 and the 100-400 have been mentioned, but even the 100-300 is not all that bad and long enough at 600 (equivalent). I took this picture with it: https://www.jetphotos.com/photo/9319754
                    If you want it small and compact, you have the 45-200 or 45-175 lenses, too....

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by jvdl View Post
                      I see there are a number of spotters already using the EOS R. I also am not a fan of the EVF, but I suppose in about 2-3 years from now I will switch to whatever Canon's next R-line model is, since that's probably going to be their R&D focus and I've got quite a few Canon lenses already.
                      I bought the EOS RP, a wonderful camera for landscape and such, but I still prefer my trusty EOS 5DIII for action photograpy, such as spotting. And I still get better photos, even landscape photos with the latter, just because it feels better, but that's definitely something personal.
                      My photos on Flickr www.flickr.com/photos/geridominguez

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by LX-A343 View Post
                        I bought the EOS RP, a wonderful camera for landscape and such, but I still prefer my trusty EOS 5DIII for action photograpy, such as spotting. And I still get better photos, even landscape photos with the latter, just because it feels better, but that's definitely something personal.
                        I definitely agree with you that my DSLR just feels better to use. Not only is the larger size more ergonomic (my mirrorless counterpart is the M50), but it's just more intuitive in terms of controls.

                        Someday I might rent the EOS R just to get a feel for the flagship mirrorless, since I've never personally used it.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by marc1201 View Post
                          What do you think about it and who uses one? Thinking about making a switch..coming from a D610 and the 80-400mm afs.
                          Thanks for the comments already.
                          What do you hope to gain by switching?
                          My photo editing guide - updated and improved Feb. 2010
                          My Nikon D100,D200,D300, D800, D7200 basic spotting settings guide
                          ACIG - the best resource for military aviation information

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by seahawk View Post
                            What do you hope to gain by switching?
                            Ok, i almost forgot that i made this post here..
                            What do i hope to gain? Well size and weight i was gaining for, but i hear that some brands do weigh as much or are as big as dslr's,so basicly i better can keep the Nikon..
                            I was/am interested in the sony a7iii and the FE 70-300 oss, with that i would gain about 800grams of weight.Not sure if you feel it that hard..After a couple of hours i assume you do feel the weight difference.

                            Marc

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by marc1201 View Post
                              Ok, i almost forgot that i made this post here..
                              What do i hope to gain? Well size and weight i was gaining for, but i hear that some brands do weigh as much or are as big as dslr's,so basicly i better can keep the Nikon..
                              I was/am interested in the sony a7iii and the FE 70-300 oss, with that i would gain about 800grams of weight.Not sure if you feel it that hard..After a couple of hours i assume you do feel the weight difference.

                              Marc
                              Problem is, you have to take the lenses into account as well. A good lens for a full frame camera is the same for mirrorless or DSLR. If you want to save weight, you will have to look for 4/3-systems, which have also smaller lenses. I'm sure, there are good lenses there as well. Apart from the EOS RP, I also bought a Canon M6, with kit lens and a 55-200. The camera itself meets my expectations, the whole system is very light, but the lenses are ... well ... not crap, but not far from it . The system performs far better with a solid Canon 24-105mm L lens for example. But then The whole package gets heavier again.
                              My photos on Flickr www.flickr.com/photos/geridominguez

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