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  • #46
    best radio?

    hey guys

    im trying to buy a radio for commercial airports (stansted and luton) and was wondering what's best, i think i found a website showing all frequencies for uk airports so im good there

    thanks in advance

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    • #47
      Originally posted by jakew04 View Post
      hey guys

      im trying to buy a radio for commercial airports (stansted and luton) and was wondering what's best, i think i found a website showing all frequencies for uk airports so im good there

      thanks in advance
      I have the Uniden EZI30XLT. Cheap but works really well for the job!

      Comment


      • #48
        Originally posted by meeshboi View Post
        I have the Uniden EZI30XLT. Cheap but works really well for the job!
        thanks mate appreciate it

        Comment


        • #49
          It all depends on how much you are willing to pay for a scanner and what you want to use it for. If you are using it mainly at civilian airports then you may only need a scanner with the VHF aircraft band (108-137MHz). If you want a scanner to also be able to receive military aircraft transmissions then you need a scanner with the UHF aircraft band (225-400MHz). You may also want to hear aircraft on the HF band or have a multi-band scanner that can pick up many other transmissions such as local marine communications, CB radio, or police and emergency services etc.

          There are many airband models on the market today all packed with various features making it hard to choose which is the best scanner for you. I will mention a few popular hand-held air-band scanners that are good value for money and ideal for listening to aviation broadcasts at air shows or airports etc.

          Scanners are available at different prices with the more expensive scanners having more features, a keypad to enter frequencies easily, having more memory to store frequencies etc.

          Icom have a very small but robust Icom IC-R6 Ultra Compact Wideband AM/FM/WFM Handheld Scanning Receiver which has a wide continuous frequency range from 100KHz to 1309.995MHz which includes the civilian & military airband but has no keypad. Without the keypad it means that manual programming is tedious so you will probably want programming software and a cable.

          GRE have the PSR-295 (now discontinued) which is very good for airband (civilian & military) listening and has a wide frequency range and includes a keypad.

          Uniden have the very popular UBC-125XLT scanner which receives both civilian and military airband frequencies, a keypad, and is a very good scanner for a reasonable price. The UBC-3500XLT has a very wide frequency range including civilian & military airband along with a keypad. The UBC-3500XLT is generally thought to be one of the best airband scanners but has now been discontinued and replaced by the expensive but professional Uniden Bearcat UBCD3600XLT Digital & Analogue Radio Scanner. Other notable Uniden Scanners which receive the civilian airband only include the Uniden UBC75XLT Handheld Scanner, the Uniden EZI-33 XLT Air band Radio Radio Scanner, and the Uniden EZI33XLT compact radio scanner

          Whistler have an affordable handheld scanner with the Whistler WS1010 Scanner which has a keypad and can receive civilian airband frequencies.

          If you are considering buying second-hand from Ebay then a highly sought after but obsolete scanner for aviation is the Yupiteru MVT-7100 which is considered to be superior to the newer MVT-7200 & MVT 7300 models. The excellent Uniden Bearcat 3500XLT has now been discontinued but these scanners can be found second-hand on Ebay etc.

          My choice personally.... I currently use an Intek AR109 ( 60+ ) which does not cover the military band. If I were to change it I would go for a Uniden UBC-125XLT (119+ ) which covers the military airband as well ( 225mhz - 400mhz ). Be careful with some scanners that claim to cover the mil frequencies but in fact do not.
          If it 'ain't broken........ Don't try to mend it !

          Comment


          • #50
            Originally posted by brianw999 View Post
            It all depends on how much you are willing to pay for a scanner and what you want to use it for. If you are using it mainly at civilian airports then you may only need a scanner with the VHF aircraft band (108-137MHz). If you want a scanner to also be able to receive military aircraft transmissions then you need a scanner with the UHF aircraft band (225-400MHz). You may also want to hear aircraft on the HF band or have a multi-band scanner that can pick up many other transmissions such as local marine communications, CB radio, or police and emergency services etc.

            There are many airband models on the market today all packed with various features making it hard to choose which is the best scanner for you. I will mention a few popular hand-held air-band scanners that are good value for money and ideal for listening to aviation broadcasts at air shows or airports etc.

            Scanners are available at different prices with the more expensive scanners having more features, a keypad to enter frequencies easily, having more memory to store frequencies etc.

            Icom have a very small but robust Icom IC-R6 Ultra Compact Wideband AM/FM/WFM Handheld Scanning Receiver which has a wide continuous frequency range from 100KHz to 1309.995MHz which includes the civilian & military airband but has no keypad. Without the keypad it means that manual programming is tedious so you will probably want programming software and a cable.

            GRE have the PSR-295 (now discontinued) which is very good for airband (civilian & military) listening and has a wide frequency range and includes a keypad.

            Uniden have the very popular UBC-125XLT scanner which receives both civilian and military airband frequencies, a keypad, and is a very good scanner for a reasonable price. The UBC-3500XLT has a very wide frequency range including civilian & military airband along with a keypad. The UBC-3500XLT is generally thought to be one of the best airband scanners but has now been discontinued and replaced by the expensive but professional Uniden Bearcat UBCD3600XLT Digital & Analogue Radio Scanner. Other notable Uniden Scanners which receive the civilian airband only include the Uniden UBC75XLT Handheld Scanner, the Uniden EZI-33 XLT Air band Radio Radio Scanner, and the Uniden EZI33XLT compact radio scanner

            Whistler have an affordable handheld scanner with the Whistler WS1010 Scanner which has a keypad and can receive civilian airband frequencies.

            If you are considering buying second-hand from Ebay then a highly sought after but obsolete scanner for aviation is the Yupiteru MVT-7100 which is considered to be superior to the newer MVT-7200 & MVT 7300 models. The excellent Uniden Bearcat 3500XLT has now been discontinued but these scanners can be found second-hand on Ebay etc.

            My choice personally.... I currently use an Intek AR109 ( 60+ ) which does not cover the military band. If I were to change it I would go for a Uniden UBC-125XLT (119+ ) which covers the military airband as well ( 225mhz - 400mhz ). Be careful with some scanners that claim to cover the mil frequencies but in fact do not.
            wow alot of information there ill probably go for one without military radar needs i really don't go to military bases anymore just cause you don't see as much and im a biz/exec enthusiast. thanks for all this information

            Comment


            • #51
              LiveATC Air Radio app.

              I always use an app called LiveATC Air Radio you can listen to any civilian airport even if you not Close to the airport. Best of all its supported on The App Store or The Google Play Store.
              I would recommend LiveATC Air Radio.

              Comment


              • #52
                Originally posted by jayjay0479 View Post
                I always use an app called LiveATC Air Radio you can listen to any civilian airport even if you not Close to the airport. Best of all its supported on The App Store or The Google Play Store.
                I would recommend LiveATC Air Radio.
                Only works in some countries, illegal to broadcast or publish radio transmissions in NZ

                Comment


                • #53
                  Originally posted by NZDN_spotting View Post
                  Only works in some countries, illegal to broadcast or publish radio transmissions in NZ
                  yea i had a look and it's illegal in the uk but i can still use a radio for just my personal use?

                  Comment


                  • #54
                    Originally posted by jayjay0479 View Post
                    I always use an app called LiveATC Air Radio you can listen to any civilian airport even if you not Close to the airport. Best of all its supported on The App Store or The Google Play Store.
                    I would recommend LiveATC Air Radio.
                    I strongly dislike LiveATC. There is a fairly long delay and usually the audio comes out very distorted and hard to understand. Unless your not near the frequency, using a UHF receiver is the best option.

                    Comment


                    • #55
                      frequencies

                      hey guys i bought a radio a couple day ago and now i was wondering what website have the real frequencies I've already got some which are working but on my radio I've put in 3 different tower frequencies. and now i'm not even sure if those ones are real so if anyone can help i would appreciate it.

                      Comment


                      • #56
                        Originally posted by jakew04 View Post
                        hey guys i bought a radio a couple day ago and now i was wondering what website have the real frequencies I've already got some which are working but on my radio I've put in 3 different tower frequencies. and now i'm not even sure if those ones are real so if anyone can help i would appreciate it.
                        look up your local airport frequency on google. LiveATC shows the required frequencies, if not other websites.

                        Comment


                        • #57
                          thank you

                          Comment


                          • #58
                            Google: [Airport ICAO code] charts

                            for example: LGSK charts

                            Most probably this search will return a Skyvector.com link in the very first results with all publicly available airport data.

                            Comment


                            • #59
                              Almost all frequencies can be found on the Jeppesen chart.
                              Click image for larger version

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                              • #60
                                correct info?

                                hey guys i just added a Bahrain - royal flight 767 into the waiting list and was just making sure i have the correct info it's classed as military/government and i put business jet in the specific category, is that correct?

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