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How many focus points to use?

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  • How many focus points to use?

    Hello everyone! I've been doing photos for a while, but I've always wondered which focus mode to use. Auto, where the camera sets focus points or single, center point. I use Canon, and using the auto focus point mode, I got the impression that some parts of the plane get focused and some don't (I've had photos rejected for that). Today I use the single point focus mode and noticed that it has improved but I still think it could be better. What kind of focus do you use? I also use AI Servo mode.





  • #2
    I tend to use single centre point focus in one shot. AI servo doesn't really do it for me.

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    • #3
      Hello!

      While doing plane spotting, I use Continuous Auto Focus (AF-C on Sony Alpha) and just one focusing point; depending on the photo/aircraft angle, I move that point from the center to the left or right.

      Here are some examples
      Center: https://www.jetphotos.com/photo/9449652
      Left: https://www.jetphotos.com/photo/9302729
      Right: https://www.jetphotos.com/photo/9449651

      If you feel that your AF is not working properly, maybe you should visit your local Canon Technical Service, they can help you to calibrate your camera and lenses.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by 聲gel Garc燰 View Post
        Hello!

        While doing plane spotting, I use Continuous Auto Focus (AF-C on Sony Alpha) and just one focusing point; depending on the photo/aircraft angle, I move that point from the center to the left or right.
        I feel like AF-C for me on sony (a6000) isn't consistent and I can't rely on it. Do you use flexible spot or zone?

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        • #5
          On Canon I used AI Servo, single spot, that's what worked best and make sure you focus on the fuselage not the engines or wing. Now on Sony I use single spot (small or medium) and AF-C and that's what works best for me, I can tell it exactly where to focus. It might not work as well on older bodies, AF technologies have greatly improved the last few years. Canon I last used the 5D4 and Sony I shoot with A7III and A9.

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          • #6
            I think the question of focus deserves further study.We start from the assumption that everything we frame beyond the "infinite" focus of the lens will be in focus.The second. If you use a maximum aperture diaphragm (eg f3.5), everything that is immediately before and immediately after the subject will be blurred. Obviously, if you use a rather closed diaphragm (eg f11), the exact opposite of what we just said occurs. It is called "field depth".Thus the "spot" or "multizone" focus point has a value considering several factors.The general illumination of the frame, the illumination of the subject, its position in the frame, how much frame the subject occupies (small or a lot), the movement with respect to the camera and much more.The focus "one shot" or "continues" depends, of course, if the subject is stationary or moving.As you can see, there was no precise "rule" on this subject and in this specific sector of photography.The portrait, for example, has its rules. But let's talk about a stationary subject, generally well lit and which occupies most of the frame. It involves the use of medium-telephoto lenses, etc.In conclusion, and apologizing for my bad English, only experience can tell you what kind of setting to use on different occasions.

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