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  • screaming_emu
    replied
    I use a fuji finepix 2800z. I know its nothing special, but its a decent cam to start out with.

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  • Eagle_Driver
    replied
    Originally posted by Leftseat86
    It has nothing to do with the camera...everything to do with the photographer.

    -Clovis
    I know That's why I said: "Don't get me wrong, I love my D100, but I think it takes a lot more practice to get images to look right straight from the camera on a D100 than with a 10D or D60 from what I've seen so far".

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  • Leftseat86
    replied
    It has nothing to do with the camera...everything to do with the photographer.

    -Clovis

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  • Eagle_Driver
    replied
    Originally posted by JeffinDEN
    What makes you say that Jon? I have little or no time on my D100 images. What firmware version is yours?
    I'm using the newest version (2.0, I think). There's just sometihng about the Canon 10D or D60 that makes aviation related shots better. With Canon it seems as if though the cameras put out sharper and show a little bit more detail than aviation related pics using the D100. Take Clovis's camera for example. His images look like they're from a Canon 10D or D60. Heck, they look better than a lot of images I've seen taken with the D100 (not just mine). I don't know if it's Canon's glass but it just seems that it puts out an almost 'perfect' picture, IMO. Don't get me wrong, I love my D100, but I think it takes a lot more practice to get images to look right straight from the camera on a D100 than with a 10D or D60 from what I've seen so far.

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  • ikara
    replied
    check out www.fotoware.com and download fotostion 5.0- has a lot of automated actions that make getting great images easy

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  • gocaps16
    replied
    Same here. I spend like less then a minute editing my photos from my Nikon D100. Just a simple resize, sharpen it, and mess with the colors and voila, you have a top quality photo.

    Kevin.

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  • JeffinDEN
    replied
    What makes you say that Jon? I have little or no time on my D100 images. What firmware version is yours?

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  • Eagle_Driver
    replied
    I use a Nikon D100, but considering 'out of the camera' images, I think, from what I've seen, pictures straight from the D100 tend to have to have more Photoshop time than lets say a Canon D60 or 10D, in my opinion.

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  • SWA733Captain
    replied
    Other.

    I use a Sony F717, i'm hoping to be upgrading to a DSLR soon.

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  • ikara
    replied
    youve got a point archiving this digital stu f is a real challenge and with the way storage media changes you need to contiually back up your work- on the otherhand harddrives a cheap at the moment

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  • SB
    replied
    whats the pentax like?
    It is fun to use. I like the instant availabilty of the image not having to wait for the slides to come back from processing is a big plus. it shares the same sensor as the Nikon D100 but in a much smaller camera. If i was new to photography would I buy the pentax? Nikon, Pentax and Canon are all good cameras. So yes i would buy it but the major drawback with the Pentax is the limited range of high spec lenses available when compared to the Canon and Nikon.

    A full review is available here http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/pentaxistd/

    Just over the weekend I was scaning a slide I took 20 years ago. What will the output of current digital cameras look like on the display devices that wil be in use in 20 years? Will they be little more than thumbnails? Thats why I will continue to use slide film as well as digital.

    Steve

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  • ikara
    replied
    digital v film

    digital has no grain as such but it does have noise which starts, on the d100 to be apparent around 400 iso. unlike film the noise or grain is not as pronounced. this gives a grainless feel at 200 iso and also allows, on good files, quite big prints. grain is a function of film sesitivity measured in iso speed. iso speed on digital is a nominal neasurement for turning up the sensitivity of a chip which equates to more noise. at the end of the day it all depends on the size and use of the final image but a good indication of the benefits of digital can be seen in the magazine industry here in australia- almost all the major companies will not take film anymore. ACP who publish titles like womens weekly and cleo are totaly digital using a mixture of canon nikon and medium format digital backs. having said all that nothing quite beats a well exposed sharp transparency

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  • ikara
    replied
    pentax

    whats the pentax like?

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  • cja
    replied
    Pentax *ist D and Sigma lenses - Canon and Nikon are not the only options. and I still shoot with Provia.
    You must be the first owner of one of theses in the UK, How is it? I would love to Know.

    By the way I noticed on the specs for the D100 that the slowest ISO setting is 200. Since joining JPNet all the commments I have seen suggest that ISO100 is the only speed to use. Is digital different to film?

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  • FlyingPhotog
    replied
    Re: Who Shoots What

    Originally posted by ikara
    as i am new to the forum and to taking pics of planes and happen to shoot nikon gear i was wondering if there are any other nikon shotters out there? If so i pose a question to the d1/d100 users- do you thing uv filters make a difference to the quality of you images?
    I use the Nikon N80 and frequently use a UV filter and a Circular Polarizer. I think it can make a good difference when used together. The UV filter I leave on for protection of the lens. I don't see it makes too much difference.

    Leave a comment:

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