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  • Question About Camera Setup - Photos Turn Out Soft

    Hello! First post here and if anything needs to be changed, please let me know!

    After submitting my first five to JetPhotos and having them rejected, I used the reasons to attempt to improve my shots/edits. Recently submitted some photos and they were rejected too. Main reasons for the most recent rejections were Undersharpened/Soft and often also Underexposed/Dark.

    Current camera setup is a Nikon D3200 with an AF-S Nikkor 55-200mm 1:4-5.6G ED lens. I usually have it set to an aperture of F9 or F8 and have my photo quality set to Fine and Raw (but I edit and submit the Raws). When I crop the Raw photos then reduce them to 1 pixel below my current maximum width of 1280, the photos lose a fair amount of quality.

    Any tips in either taking the photos or in editing to get the best results and have my photos [hopefully] approved?

    Attached is the link to a few of the photos that I had submitted before and after editing in case it helps (both are JPEG due to IMGUR not accepting Raw)! Thank you in advance

    Post with 0 views. Photo vs Rudimentary Edits

  • #2
    Originally posted by dadasmithywinkle View Post
    Hello! First post here and if anything needs to be changed, please let me know!

    After submitting my first five to JetPhotos and having them rejected, I used the reasons to attempt to improve my shots/edits. Recently submitted some photos and they were rejected too. Main reasons for the most recent rejections were Undersharpened/Soft and often also Underexposed/Dark.

    Current camera setup is a Nikon D3200 with an AF-S Nikkor 55-200mm 1:4-5.6G ED lens. I usually have it set to an aperture of F9 or F8 and have my photo quality set to Fine and Raw (but I edit and submit the Raws). When I crop the Raw photos then reduce them to 1 pixel below my current maximum width of 1280, the photos lose a fair amount of quality.

    Any tips in either taking the photos or in editing to get the best results and have my photos [hopefully] approved?

    Attached is the link to a few of the photos that I had submitted before and after editing in case it helps (both are JPEG due to IMGUR not accepting Raw)! Thank you in advance
    Hi,

    In a short summary, I would say your issue are three-fold (in descending order of importance):
    1. lack of/poor editing skill
    2. equipment/settings limitations
    3. shooting conditions
    As an example of poor editing, I think the quality is there for the second image (and probably the first as well) that someone who knew what they were doing should be able to come up with an edit decent enough to be accepted. That being said, with better equipment/settings (especially the latter) you wouldn't need to be such an editing wizard to get something acceptable. For example, the second image is quite noisy, when it looks like there is more than enough light to avoid hi-ISO settings. Are you using auto-ISO, or did you have the ISO set high on purpose? Finally, for shooting conditions, gloomy overcast conditions will always cause problems, and I don't think anyone, no matter how high-end their equipment or masterful their editing skills, would have been able to get something decent from the third image. Best to realize when the conditions aren't great, but you want to keep shooting, that those image probably won't be destined for upload.

    If you have any specific questions about the points above, feel free to ask, and also take a read here when you get the chance:

    https://forums.jetphotos.com/forum/a...ning-from-crew

    It's also easy to attach your images directly to your posts, like this:

    Click image for larger version

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    • #3
      Originally posted by dlowwa View Post

      Hi,

      In a short summary, I would say your issue are three-fold (in descending order of importance):
      1. lack of/poor editing skill
      2. equipment/settings limitations
      3. shooting conditions
      As an example of poor editing, I think the quality is there for the second image (and probably the first as well) that someone who knew what they were doing should be able to come up with an edit decent enough to be accepted. That being said, with better equipment/settings (especially the latter) you wouldn't need to be such an editing wizard to get something acceptable. For example, the second image is quite noisy, when it looks like there is more than enough light to avoid hi-ISO settings. Are you using auto-ISO, or did you have the ISO set high on purpose?
      Thank you for the response! Definitely a noob with photography and editing and have no issues leaving these photos in the reject pile as I learn to take and edit better ones.

      I currently have the camera set to ISO-A or auto ISO sensitivity control. I have the other sensitivity settings set to a max of 1600 with an auto min shutter speed. ISO sensitivity is set to Hi 1 between the options of Hi 1 and 6400. I tried attaching a photo, but it may have not let me due to it being a RAW?

      Thanks again for the help!

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by dadasmithywinkle View Post

        Thank you for the response! Definitely a noob with photography and editing and have no issues leaving these photos in the reject pile as I learn to take and edit better ones.

        I currently have the camera set to ISO-A or auto ISO sensitivity control. I have the other sensitivity settings set to a max of 1600 with an auto min shutter speed. ISO sensitivity is set to Hi 1 between the options of Hi 1 and 6400. I tried attaching a photo, but it may have not let me due to it being a RAW?

        Thanks again for the help!
        You are correct raw images cannot be attached, but jpegs can, and all of the images post in your link are jpegs, so..

        Probably best to avoid auto-anything in your settings, especially ISO. Anything higher than ~ISO200-400 will likely be too noisy to be accepted here. Learn yourself the correct settings so you don't need to rely on your camera to do it for you.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by dlowwa View Post

          You are correct raw images cannot be attached, but jpegs can, and all of the images post in your link are jpegs, so..

          Probably best to avoid auto-anything in your settings, especially ISO. Anything higher than ~ISO200-400 will likely be too noisy to be accepted here. Learn yourself the correct settings so you don't need to rely on your camera to do it for you.
          Awesome, thank you! I changed it to manual for ISO and will play with the ISO settings to better understand my camera. Are there any other camera-related tips that you'd recommend checking out/doing?

          Thank you

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by dadasmithywinkle View Post

            Awesome, thank you! I changed it to manual for ISO and will play with the ISO settings to better understand my camera. Are there any other camera-related tips that you'd recommend checking out/doing?

            Thank you
            Everyone will have their own prefered settings, so I can't make a blanket statement saying one was is better than another. Myself, I use either aperture priority mode, with the ISO manually set, or if I don't feel confident in how the metering is picking things up, fully-manual. Before you do that, better to learn the basics of photography (like the exposure triangle, the effects of larger and smaller apertures, etc..) so you actually understand how the different setting affect each other. Putting it in aperture-priority like I do would be pretty pointless if you don't know what the effects of opening up or closing down the aperture are exactly.

            Comment

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