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  • Full explanation of rejection reasons

    Here it is at last, it only took us nearly two years to manage this.

    At the moment there is a great deal of discussion among the crew about screening standards in general so it seems like a good time to post the rejection reasons here and get your feedback on what else you would like to see explained etc. Please add your thoughts and help us to help you by explaining things better.



    Bad Angle

    The angle that you have used does not show the aircraft in a very good light, 'ass end' shots are particularly vulnerable to getting this rejection reason as are shots taken directly underneath an aircraft or just a little off the runway centreline on final approach. If a shot shows a clear motivation then we are obviously prepared to be flexible, such situations might include a smoky touchdown or a strong crosswind approach.


    Backlit

    Don't take pictures with the sun in your eyes-the sun is there for many purposes one of which is to give us light with which to see things, shooting against the sun puts the visible half of the aircraft in shadow which means we can't see it to its advantage. There are some airports which suffer badly from backlit pictures, Manchester, Frankfurt, Atlanta and Brisbane are the most popular ones at this site but all airports produce backlit shots from time to time. Zurich for example has excellent facilities for photographers but the viewing deck becomes backlit in the afternoon so whether you are at Zurich or Brisbane or Atlanta the thing to remember is that you need to move to a spot with the sun at your back because if you upload backlit shots they will be rejected. An exception to this is when the photographer is creating a sunset/sunrise type at which time the vivid colors and weak sunlight produce very pleasing results-properly executed dusk and dawn shots are always welcome but please don't flood us with such images because they are very difficult to get right.


    Badinfo

    The auto-fill feature will only reflect what is already in the database, if that information is wrong then you will get a badinfo reject unless you check the information yourself which can be done using the jetliner census which is already incorporated into JetPhotos, new registraions can also be checked here http://home.hccnet.nl/p.w.riool/main.html, failing that a simple search on Google will almost certainly yield the required information. Uploading information such as Boeing 737-3.. or 737-300 is not acceptable and will be rejected. ER aircraft should be submitted as (ER) not /ER, for example Boeing 777-212(ER). Airports should be listed with the apprporiate codes (KLAX, EGCC, YSSY, LEBL etc) and airlines should be should also entered using the drop down menus where appropriate, the same goes for airlines. Where an airline is not available from the menu please enter it manually but not using all capital letters which is a common mistake.


    Blurry

    Simple-we don't accept blurry pictures, it is impossible to define what level of blurriness causes a rejection but it should be remembered that unlike a soft picture a blurry picture will never be sharp. Common faults that cause blurriness are not using a fast enough shutter speed and camera shake, for those using SLRs the general rule is too make sure that the shutter speed is higher than the focal length at which you are shooting.


    Categories

    To ensure that visitors to the site can find what they are looking for we ask that you make sure the correct categories have been checked at the time of upload. If no categories apply then don't tick any of them. For clarification it should be remembered that dawn and dusk shots are considered to be night shots, and Vintage/Warbird applies to anything which is no longer in regular service and has been preserved.


    Centrered

    Take care to ensure that the subject matter is properly framed in the centre of the picture, this means both vertically and horizontally.


    CMOS dust

    Dust on the CMOS is the biggest drawback of DSLRs and cannot realistically be avoided, but dust spots are easily removed from pictures by using the cloning tool in your editing program, it is a very simple procedure and one which every digital photographer should be able to do. Dust spots on pictures are too easy to remove for us to consider adding such images to the database.


    Color

    The screening team at JetPhotos see thousands of pictures every week so we know what colors planes are supposed to be, poor editing often results in colors which just dont look right but the most common problem is when pictures are taken from behind glass in airport terminals because this glass is tinted and creates a color cast on your pictures which does not reflect the colors you would see if you were the other side of the glass. Every editing program has a tool to alter colors and if you have been shooting from behind tinted glass these tools need to be used to make the pictures acceptable.


    Compression

    Save your images at a high resolution, saving at low resolution is great for saving disk space but it means you are loing large amounts of quality from the image, areas which are the first to show signs of over-compression are where colors border each other in particular the registration and cockpit areas.


    Contrast

    If a picture is rejected for badcontrast it means that the dark areas are too dark and the bright areas are too bright, you may be able to fix it using a photoediting program but it is not often the case.


    Cropping

    This means that the picture has not been cropped properly, we often see pictures with white edges visible and these should have been cropped out.


    Part of subject missing/cut off

    This is mostly a problem with shots which are taken from the side of the aircraft but it is somewhat subjective as in many cases cropping out parts of the aircraft improves the picture dramatically, but if something has been cut off without a clear motive for doing so it will most likely be rejected.


    Too dark

    Pictures taken under cloudy skies or at dusk and dawn frequently need to be brightened up to make them acceptable for the database, please remember to do this before uploading your picture.


    Double upload

    This will occur if you upload the same picture twice.


    Filename

    Only use standard ASCII characters in your filenames otherwise we are unable to view your picture and it will be rejected.


    Glare

    Glare from the sun and reflections on windows are the main culprits here, avoiding sun glare through aircraft windows is almost impossible and we do not recommend that you uploads pictures taken from inside aircraft unless the sun is behind you. if you are shooting from behind glass never use a flash as your picture will be completely unsuitable for JetPhotos, other than that be sure that when you are framing your subject you check around it through the viewfinder and make sure there are no reflection on the glass which will result in a rejection if uploaded.


    Too much grain

    This affects film and slide users means that areas of the picture are affected by discoloured pixels which give the picture an overall poor quality. Blue skies are usually the first areas to see this effect.


    Heat distortion

    As temperatures rise heat distortion is more likely to occur, particularly at airports, it is evidenced by an apparent blurriness of the subject and is more aparrent when shooting at distance. To avoid heat haze try and shoot in the early morning or late evening and allow a subject to get as close as possible before pressing the shutter. Heat distortion cannot be fixed by editing and contrary to what some people say there is no such thing as a heat haze filter.


    Horizon

    One of the most common rejection reasons, it means the picture is not level. To ensure your picture is level use a vertical reference point such a building to straighten things out. All shots should be level, this includes window views where the horizon is visible and cabin/flight deck shots.


    Manipulation

    Any picture which has been significantly altered during the editing process will be rejected, this means adding things that were not originally in the picture or removing significant elements of the shot. Anybody found to be uploading fake pictures (or pictures that are not theirs) can expect to be permanently banned from the site.


    Bad Motive

    Means we are not sure what you are trying to show us with your picture, what is the motive for the shot? It can also mean that your picture is not sufficiently aviation related for us to accept-this is particularly the case with window view shots which must either be an overview of an airport or have a significant amount of the aircraft in view and be visually appealling, a wingtip plus a few clouds is not what we are looking for here. Be careful with airport views too, an overview of the front of an airport is usually ok but a picture of some random people in coffee bars is not.


    Too much noise

    Almost identical to 'Too much grain' but noise is mostly a problem with digital cameras. Low end (cheaper) digital cameras are the worst offenders but it can still affect the more expensive DSLRs.


    Obstructing objects/Clutter

    This means that the aircraft is not fully visible due to it being obstructed by anything from long grass to catering trucks. Aircraft on their stands are almost always surrounded by service vehicles which make photography very difficult if you want the results to end up on JetPhotos, long grass is also a problem if you shooting at the perimeter-as are fences, light poles and other airport equiptment.


    Oversharpened

    All images require a degree of sharpening to make them acceptable to JetPhotos but if you overdo it the picture will look worse than when you started. Oversharpening can be recognised by the formation of jagged lines along cheatlines, wing edges and tail fins, in addition to this if you oversharpen an image it can result in a 'halo' effect appearing in areas of high contrast.


    Bad quality

    A bad quality rejection means that the picture has many problems and is not worth considering further editing.


    Bad scan

    A common problem when using slide/print scanners is ensuring that the scanner and print or slide is clean, free from hairs/dust particles and not scratched. It is these things which cause a bad scan rejection.


    Bad soft

    This means your picture is not sharp enough for the database, go back to your editing program and add a little more sharpening until you can get the picture to look sharp and then reupload. Softness is usually a result of poor editing rather than a problem with the actual piture taking. Many cheaper lenses will give you a soft image if used under poor light and at longer focal lengths, if this happens it is unlikely that any amount editing will save the image.


    Too far

    Simply means that the subject is too far away and there is too much dead space in the picture, try and get closer if you can. You may be able to rescue the situation by cropping closer to subject but this will result in a loss of quality.


    Overexposed

    This means that the sensor or film was exposed to too much light and has resulted in the picture being pale in color and having a white cast to it. Light meters in cheaper cameras are easily fooled and the nice deep blue sky of a winters day will fool them into overexposing the aircraft. The most important thing is for the aircraft to be correctly exposed, provided the rest of the image is not too dark or too bright your picture should be acceptable.





    Matt
    My gallery of transport and travel pictures.

    Click Here to view my photos at RailPictures.Net!

  • #2
    Very informative Matt, thanks for posting.
    I think the descriptions of the various rejections was more than adequate.
    George R. Widener
    Oshkosh, WI USA
    Aircraft Photos Here
    Railroad Pictures Here

    Comment


    • #3
      Very Definitive and Clear Matt Very Helpful to know exactly what it all means
      http://www.aircraftinaction.co.uk/

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Full explanation of rejection reasons

        Originally posted by egll
        ER aircraft should be submitted as (ER) not /ER, for example Boeing 777-212(ER).


        Will F.
        Photos: JetPhotos.Net | Airliners.net | General Photography

        Comment


        • #5
          I think perhaps Matt got it backwards, as in that it should be /ER vs (ER). I seem to recall having a shot or two rejected because I put them in as (ER).
          Or perhaps I am hallucinating and imagined the whole thing.
          George R. Widener
          Oshkosh, WI USA
          Aircraft Photos Here
          Railroad Pictures Here

          Comment


          • #6
            I know, I know........problem is that the census marks it as (ER) and that is what we check against when checking info. We never really got to a conclusion on the issue in the crew forum but as far I can tell (ER) is what seems to get the most agreement and it is important from a database point of view for all the information is consistent so (ER) is the preferred choice and /ER won't mean rejection but it will mean that the information needs to be corrected.

            The upload menus say /ER because they were stolen from Anet as they keep on telling us .



            Matt
            My gallery of transport and travel pictures.

            Click Here to view my photos at RailPictures.Net!

            Comment


            • #7
              So in the future, do you want us to select the type of plane, and then manually correct the "ER" part?

              I think some standardization is desperately needed here...
              Will F.
              Photos: JetPhotos.Net | Airliners.net | General Photography

              Comment


              • #8
                Well when using the auto fill, most of the time it comes up correctly Will.
                Sam Rudge
                A 5D3, some Canon lenses, the Sigma L and a flash

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Simpleboy
                  Well when using the auto fill, most of the time it comes up correctly Will.
                  And stupid me intentionally changed them back to /ER...
                  Will F.
                  Photos: JetPhotos.Net | Airliners.net | General Photography

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Crazy764
                    Originally posted by Simpleboy
                    Well when using the auto fill, most of the time it comes up correctly Will.
                    And stupid me intentionally changed them back to /ER...


                    This aircraft type thing is a task, we will have to adress ASAP, as it seems

                    Gerardo
                    My photos on Flickr www.flickr.com/photos/geridominguez

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by LX-A343
                      Originally posted by Crazy764
                      Originally posted by Simpleboy
                      Well when using the auto fill, most of the time it comes up correctly Will.
                      And stupid me intentionally changed them back to /ER...


                      This aircraft type thing is a task, we will have to adress ASAP, as it seems

                      Gerardo
                      Hehe. That'll be good. I never knew (ER) was preferred.
                      Will F.
                      Photos: JetPhotos.Net | Airliners.net | General Photography

                      Comment

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