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How do you get rid of these annoying...(OPEN for ALL)

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  • tommyalf
    replied
    Jaggies on cheat lines like that are normal sometimes even without sharpening. Of course the more you sharpen the more the jaggies will come out. I've use the magic wand in Photoshop to select the cheat lines that are prone to jaggies and inversed the wand and sharpened the rest of the plane. It works very well for me, can be a bit time consuming but I've had great luck with it.

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  • FAJS-SAA
    replied
    Originally posted by MaxPower
    Thanks. I'll be sure to try this one later tonight.
    Sure...No probs... Hope it works for you....

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  • MaxPower
    replied
    Thanks. I'll be sure to try this one later tonight.

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  • FAJS-SAA
    replied
    I got this from someone else's workflow, and it seams to work, and maybe this is the answer for those "spikes".

    In PS, when cropping, u have an option to select the size ratio, just below the toolbar. When clicking on "Front Image", it determines the size of the photo but also selects resolution at 72ppi. Erase the 72 to have a clear box. This way when cropping, it just merely cut the photo without resampling to 72ppi, and still maintaining the original photo resolution. Then only when you resize, it resamples the image.
    Otherwhise if you don't do this, it resamples the image twice, and maybe thats where the "spikes" comes from.

    I'm doing this for a while now, and realised that you can crop really tight, even on a far subject, and still end up above 1024px without losing any quality.

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  • MaxPower
    replied
    Okey I got it. *Opened the PS * Bicubic that is...

    Thanks.

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  • Genessee
    replied
    Hey Hey? There should be an option on the resize box for the method of resampling with five options..

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  • MaxPower
    replied
    Originally posted by Genessee
    It can't hurt to try. I DID get an explaination for why it's better, but I've since forgotten. D'OH! I for got to say that it was also mentioned to use "Bi-Cubic" resampling.
    Im sorry, Can you say that in english please ?

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  • Genessee
    replied
    It can't hurt to try. I DID get an explaination for why it's better, but I've since forgotten. D'OH! I for got to say that it was also mentioned to use "Bi-Cubic" resampling.

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  • MaxPower
    replied
    Thank you Brandon. Seems to be the best option here. I'll have to try it out later. Many thanks to you.
    I hope I'll do any progress with your suggestion.

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  • Genessee
    replied
    I've always gotten those as well. I had a discussion about processing sometime ago while out taking pictures, and someone suggested to resize in steps...

    It seems to have helped quite a bit. Insted of going from 2800 or 3000 pixels (across) to 1600, 1200, or 1024 -- it seems better to resize in 200 pixel steps. Then I sharpen around 2000 pixels, go down to my final size (again, in 200 pixel steps), and finish sharpening.. It could be just me, but it seems to have helped quite a bit. I used to always see those jaggies, no matter how I sharpened, they seem much less noticeable this way..

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  • MaxPower
    replied
    ^^ Thanks alot. So after you adds USM into it, Erase it, Okey what tool are you using to erase the jaggies with. ??

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  • E-Diddy!
    replied
    Ahh fashionably late I see (that's what happens when you go golfing out of town for a few days)

    Lately I've been doing the progressive sharpening thing, but instead of giving it 500 / .2 / 3 I've gone to 250 / .2 / 0. Much better control of the jaggies that way. After every pass of USM, I erase away jaggies, then duplicate the layer and apply another pass (you wouldn't believe how sharp you can get a photo this way without actually oversharpening it).

    And to make sure I don't miss any jaggies, I always, always, always make a duplicate layer before applying another pass of USM. This way if you miss any you can still go down and erase through the layers. I only flatten when I'm finished.

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  • LX-A343
    replied
    No need to wait for Eric. Simply read here:
    http://www.rockymountainavphotos.com.../Workflows.htm

    Gerardo

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  • MaxPower
    replied
    Originally posted by CPH Aviation
    There has been a thread about this before a long time ago. As far as I remember these jagged lines only appear when the photo is cropped and resized, and it has nothing to do with sharpness on the photo. Now there is something you can tick in PhotoShop, and offcause I can't remember what that was I'll try and see if I can find it in the forums!
    Hey Soren. Hmmm I think you are right. I think its the big reason why they appear. It'd be nice to know what do I have to do to prevent it. What I only did is like you said. Cropped and resized. I might be doing something wrong, as many of my photos are being edited trough Eric Smiths Workflow, and they do appear many times.

    So If Eric ever get to read this , I would like to get advices from him as well.

    Thanks alot Soren !
    Last edited by MaxPower; 2006-05-14, 09:55.

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  • CPH Aviation
    replied
    There has been a thread about this before a long time ago. As far as I remember these jagged lines only appear when the photo is cropped and resized, and it has nothing to do with sharpness on the photo. Now there is something you can tick in PhotoShop, and offcause I can't remember what that was I'll try and see if I can find it in the forums!

    Soren

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