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  • #16
    Originally posted by MaxPower
    I guess screeners have different opinions after all, Jid excepted that one which Will just said to Tomas should appeal that one with jaggies, unless Will was wrong with that second one which is the IB346 with jaggies.
    Sure theres a few jaggies on the port wing , but the overall image quality seems fine to me , a quick re-edit shoudl see it right

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    • #17
      Tomas, when I first started uploading pics here and elsewhere I had something like a 90% rejection rate. That was mostly because 90% of the early pic efforts were crap . I didn't think so at the time and got very disappointed as well.
      Now, crap is one word that CANNOT be used to describe your pics. They are all basically very good ( I wish I'd taken some of them ) and, as others have said, can be fixed by reworking them in photoshop. Don't try to rework the existing pics. Go back to the original file and start again.

      Do you shoot in .jpg or RAW format ? I shoot exclusively in RAW these days and tend towards a slight underexposure. That way the camera records detail which can be worked on in Photoshop. If the original is overexposed then no amount of Photoshop work will reproduce what isn't there in the first place.

      What workflow do you use ?

      There are workflow patterns posted in these forums that may well be of help. I believe Jid amongst others is one person who has posted on this subject.

      Personally I work in this manner.....

      1. Rotate the whole original as required to level the shot.
      2. Crop in order to centre and leave out unnecessary detail.
      3. Clone out any dustspots, select Equalise, find more dustspots ( its amazing how many are there which you don't see in a "clean" image ) and clone them out.
      4. Resize to 1024 wide. ( Or high, if the image is portrait format )
      5. Set white balance using the white eyedropper in the curves function.
      6. Set contrast and then brightness if required. ( Contrast first as this will sharpen and adjust brightness to a degree. )
      7. Apply USM sharpening. I usually start with a setting of 100, 0.2, 0. Sharpen in stages and if necessary apply some selective sharpening.
      8. At this point I close my eyes, rest them, make a cup of tea etc., whatever it takes to relieve the strain on them and then recheck the pic. Is it what I want to upload or do I see a problem which means a rework ? This is probably the most important stage of the workflow as it is so easy to become so engrossed in your work that you miss an important error.
      9. Save as .jpg, renaming the file if necessary.

      I'm sure others will say that they don't use that method. I'm new to digital processing and I'm sure my workflow could be improved or changed but this seems to work for me as my acceptance rate is up around 90% at the moment.

      Don't get disillusioned. This hobby of ours has become highly technical compared to the good old days of prints and slides and processing is an ever increasing learning curve.
      Have a great time at the beach, sink a few beers and come back for another go. Believe me, the satisfaction you get when a previously rejected photo is accepted is probably greater then getting one in first time.
      If it 'ain't broken........ Don't try to mend it !

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      • #18
        Brian ,

        Some well worthy tips there !
        thanks to the white balance dropper thingy in curves my pics in the snow now look normal ! Mainly because i forgot that snow reflects UV light and I didn't use a filter !!

        Thankyou !!!

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        • #19
          Originally posted by brianw999
          8. At this point I close my eyes, rest them, make a cup of tea etc., whatever it takes to relieve the strain on them and then recheck the pic. Is it what I want to upload or do I see a problem which means a rework ? This is probably the most important stage of the workflow as it is so easy to become so engrossed in your work that you miss an important error.
          This point is a hugely important and rarely discussed one. I always do this when editing photos for the exact same reason as stated. Its funny how, even giving your eyes a 10 second break from your image and looking back with a more neutral view to it will show up issues that your mind woruld have pushed to the back of your head previously.

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