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I guess I just don't know how to process...

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  • I guess I just don't know how to process...

    Hey guys,
    After countless efforts, I guess I just can't get the whole editing thing down. I guess maybe I just don't have the eye for editing yet, but:
    http://www.jetphotos.net/viewreject_b.php?id=1359358
    http://www.jetphotos.net/viewreject_b.php?id=1359368
    http://www.jetphotos.net/viewreject_b.php?id=1359348
    The middle one, I can see is blown out. But, especially with the first one, I can't really see anything that is wrong.
    So my questions:
    1. What defines overprosessing?
    2. How can I edit better?
    Thanks,
    A.M.
    ps- If it helps, I use Corel PSP.

  • #2
    Can you post the steps you take during processing of a original photo?
    My photos on Flickr www.flickr.com/photos/geridominguez

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    • #3
      Well onvious faults in No.1

      a) there is a line visible between the buildings
      b) looks like too much noise reduction
      c) because of that it is too soft
      My photo editing guide - updated and improved Feb. 2010
      My Nikon D100,D200,D300, D800, D7200 basic spotting settings guide
      ACIG - the best resource for military aviation information

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Star Alliance
        Hey guys,

        The middle one, I can see is blown out. But, especially with the first one, I can't really see anything that is wrong.
        So my questions:
        1. What defines overprosessing?
        2. How can I edit better?
        Thanks,
        A.M.
        Over processing means you are doing too much in PS to rework the pictures. If you could post the originals it would help to see where the starting point is.

        The whites are over exposed because you can't see any details/panels. When I first tried shooting airliners at Logan I had this problem. Underexpose a stop of two.

        Not sure you work flow to edit, but I've always been a big fan of JID's. It's helped me with all of mine.
        http://www.jid.me.uk/workflow/

        Try reworking your orignals using his workflow and post the edited shot and lets see the difference. It does appear you are doing too much noise reduction as the images appear soft. IMO.

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        • #5
          Hey M.:

          Looking at your EXIF you have a few things against you from the gate... namely, the Panasonic point n shoot. Those cameras use a lot of in-camera noise reduction that soften up the image. The other thing working against you is you're shooting from inside a terminal, right? The windows will cut out some contrast and possibly some sharpness. You're shooting at the lowest ISO for the camera, right? I don't know if those go to 50. You're shooting with the highest JPEG quality too, right?

          As far as your rejects...

          1. It looks like there's a box or something on the image... a horizontal and vertical line around the left and top parts. I like the look but the image is too soft/compressed.

          2. Soft... too much noise reduction. Motion blur might come into play too since it's 1/125 exposure time if the plane was moving.

          3. This one looks saveable but the tail is too saturated.

          I don't think its your PS so much as you need better vantage points. Being behind glass puts you behind the 8-ball already.

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          • #6
            All,
            Thanks for the help so far.
            In responce to some comments:
            • Yes, I do use the "Noise Reduction" feature in PSP.
            • I was shooting from behind glass at ATL and ORD for these ones.
            • The Panasonic DMCLZ2 that I was using is not a very good av. camera. I have a Canon S3 IS that I consider my "good" camera, but I was on a band trip to Chicago. Since the S3 is expensive and new, I didn't really want to take it, lest something happen to it.
            • I will try Jid's workflow, and post the results along with the origionals (if so required.)
            Thanks for all the help!
            A.M.

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            • #7
              I think your biggest burden here was shooting behind glass. If you are able to get the lens dead square against the glass you then have to hope it's clean, if it's double glazed any background reflection will be in the outer pain of glass and not much you can do about that. Reflections of the building you were in are visible in the above pics especially the lights, certainly not something you should start cloning out there is far too much.
              I feel these are for the personal collection.

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