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What's wrong with this pic?

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  • What's wrong with this pic?

    Hi everyone.

    I've been trying to make this picture look right for quite a while now and am still not happy with it, so I thought I'd make a post about it here. Problem is, even though the histogram looks fine I feel that the shot is overexposed. Maybe it's just me or my monitor, but I'd still be glad to hear a few other opinions. In addition, I see a blueish taint which I just seem not be able to get rid of. Does anyone know how to do that?

    Any help much appreciated!

    http://img120.imageshack.us/my.php?i...k250307to6.jpg


  • #2
    The blueish tint is easy, just pull up the curves tool and change it from RGB to blue then move the slider until the tint has been removed. The pic seems far from overexposed, if anything id say slightly under-exposed. It could also use a touch more USM and a dash of contrast. Should be good to go after this.

    Comment


    • #3
      The biggest flaw is that it has been taken on a screener's turf

      Seriously: color can be corrected by different ways, curves being one of them. Instead of changing only one color (i.e. Blue), try to set different white points, just to see what happens to the photo overall.
      My photos on Flickr www.flickr.com/photos/geridominguez

      Comment


      • #4
        First of all, thanks for the feedback to both of you guys!

        Originally posted by LX-A343
        The biggest flaw is that it has been taken on a screener's turf
        Why, is that your secret spot?
        Originally posted by LX-A343
        Instead of changing only one color (i.e. Blue), try to set different white points, just to see what happens to the photo overall.
        Ok thanks, but how do I do that in PS?

        Comment


        • #5
          Go into the "levels" menu ("Tonwertkorrektur"). There you will find three color select tools. One of them is the one you need to select a white point. Now click into the photo on a point, which you think is a neutral white point. Play around a bit and see, what happens.

          If you shoot RAW, you can do the same with your RAW converter.

          Gerardo
          My photos on Flickr www.flickr.com/photos/geridominguez

          Comment


          • #6
            Alright, I'll try that when I'm at home. Thanks Gerardo!

            Comment


            • #7
              I would say it's not overexposed, so fear not. For a white aircraft it looks decent, but could use some contrast. Something that you should make yourself familiar with is the info palette in PS. Look at the R G B and the Sigma indicators. 0 is black, 255 is maximum, and 300% on Sigma is the "total saturation" or black, so to speak, 0% is white. Once you get comfortable reading those you can determine numerically (not just by eyeballing) whether something is overexposed or is "too hot" and how much color cast you have.

              Remember that RGB is an additive system where you combine colors to reach white. When you look at your RGB primaries, they are "gray" when they line up evenly. Your fuselage had more B than R, so we have to set out to even them out.

              Going over various parts of the fuselage I see You have nothing blown out, which is a good start. I correct color in RAW, but in PS, I use curves. I applied a mild S-curve for some contrast, then used the white point tool on an area near the nose where the plane is the "hottest" to find the best white point where it would snap neutrals to white but would not start clipping the plane. Here's what I came up with. Use your eyedropper when you zoom in and you'll see that all of the fine detail is still there, but the plane is nice and "white" without actually being too hot and no large areas of 255/255/255 except on a specular highlight on the nose. Of course you could use a separate curve on the blue channel to pull it back, but in most cases I find the white point tool is very good at hitting the right snap. In a good sun-on position, white paint tends to be around 220-240 RGB.

              This example is a little strong (I'd probably pull it back just a bit) but it'll give you a ballpark idea of where to go.

              http://homepage.mac.com/kefkafloyd/....s/thaiedit.jpg

              FULL DISCLAIMER: I am not a screener, I am just advising as someone who makes his living off PS.

              Comment


              • #8
                If it helps this was the result of setting the white point on the area just above the cockpit, between the centre cockpit screen pillar and the co-pilots forward screen pillar. Also added one pass of USM at 50, 0.3, 0.

                Right side of pic is adjusted side, left side -your original.




                If it 'ain't broken........ Don't try to mend it !

                Comment


                • #9
                  Dan....that is seriously spooky. We posted within minutes of each other and came up with damn near the same result using different approaches !!!
                  If it 'ain't broken........ Don't try to mend it !

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Wheres your disclaimer eh Brian?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by BA747-436
                      Wheres your disclaimer eh Brian?
                      In my job, I've got a bloody great reference book of suitable disclaimers.
                      If it 'ain't broken........ Don't try to mend it !

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by brianw999
                        Dan....that is seriously spooky. We posted within minutes of each other and came up with damn near the same result using different approaches !!!
                        Great minds think alike, Brian! We actually did the exact same thing for white point, except I just put in a little extra contrast.

                        Wheres your disclaimer eh Brian?
                        Covering myself, it's only fair!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by dvincent (not a screener :) )
                          Something that you should make yourself familiar with is the info palette in PS.
                          Little but useful tip, which I surely will try on my next batch of photo edits.

                          Just another thing: you also mentioned the s-curve to add more contrast. While it enhances the look of the highlights, in my opinion the shadows get too dark, not too dark for a rejection in any way, but too dark for my personal taste. So what I often do is something like a "double S", i.e. first a "S-curve", then brightening up the shadows again. Of course, I did the same to this photo ... and left it on my PC at home

                          Another approach is
                          a) S-curve
                          b) adjustment layer to brighten up shadows again

                          Which tools do you use do to add more contrast without loosing too much details in the shadows?

                          Gerardo
                          My photos on Flickr www.flickr.com/photos/geridominguez

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by LX-A343
                            Little but useful tip, which I surely will try on my next batch of photo edits.

                            Just another thing: you also mentioned the s-curve to add more contrast. While it enhances the look of the highlights, in my opinion the shadows get too dark, not too dark for a rejection in any way, but too dark for my personal taste. So what I often do is something like a "double S", i.e. first a "S-curve", then brightening up the shadows again. Of course, I did the same to this photo ... and left it on my PC at home

                            Another approach is
                            a) S-curve
                            b) adjustment layer to brighten up shadows again

                            Which tools do you use do to add more contrast without loosing too much details in the shadows?

                            Gerardo
                            Like I said, my edit was probably a little on the strong side, but an "S" curve doesn't have to be too strong. The beauty of curves is that you can customize exactly how you want the tones to map. I agree with you that muddying up the shadows is a concern with them, so I tend to leave the lower half of the "S" a little more on the linear side than on the upper half of the S. It really depends on what part of the image needs the most contrast.

                            For example, here's a curve that gives a slight boost in contrast to the mid to upper quarter tones and mostly leaves the shadows linear but brings them down slightly to give that extra appearance of contrast.



                            There's no need for another adjustment layer if you need to brighten up your shadows - you can always try a curve like this.



                            Which will bring out both contrast and help brighten up shadows a bit. Contrast will always be a bit of a war between having nice looking bright areas and dark areas that don't fill in and it's a matter of touch. The info palette (watch out for clipping individual channels) helps along with a monitor that has properly calibrated brightness/contrast settings.

                            The beauty of the curves tool (and why nobody should ever use brightness/contrast) is that unless you move the start/endpoints of the curve, it will NOT clip overall like the brightness/contrast or levels tool will. You run the risk of clipping an individual channel, but that's only if you get really wacky and by that point you'll see what you did wrong anyway.

                            One side-effect of bringing up contrast is that you can oversaturate the image, a -5 or sometimes a -10 of overall saturation tends to fix this while keeping the overall tones contrasty.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Hi Dan,

                              I think I understand most of the steps you explained. However, I am unsure what method to use to find and set my whitepoint. What I just did is trying to find my whitepoint using Threshold. Just as you explained, I defined a point in the nose area as my whitepoint and then brought up my Levels palette in order to do the actual adjustment. I don't really see a noticeable improvement in the picture which leaves me asking myself whether I did the right thing...

                              But thanks so far for all the tips, and also to you Brian

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