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  • Too much/ Too little contrast.

    http://www.jetphotos.net//viewreject_b.php?id=1699052

    Very weird lighting, which I thought made it interesting. Any suggestions?


    Dave Brook
    Cambridge, Ontario

  • #2
    Weired lighting indeed. Perhaps a warm filter could be added to bring the colours out and make it have a less 'cold' appearance.

    Comment


    • #3
      I liked the cold part only because I froze my hands getting the shot. However, how would I warm it up? Is there something in Photoshop?

      Thanks.


      Dave Brook
      Cambridge, Ontario

      Comment


      • #4
        Well, if the reason for that weird lighting is snow on the ground reflecting off the fuselage, then I don't see the point in trying to make the colors look warmer. Plus, I have no clue how this is done.

        I'd simply adjust the curves.

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        • #5
          it would also be good if too much / too little contrast rejection reason actually stated which rather than leaving people guess as to which way to go.

          This has been requested before but seems to get ignored every time. Surely the screeners can tell which it is and even using the 'set white / black points' on PS does not always lead to acceptable contrast.

          Comment


          • #6
            it is very easy:

            check, if the photo show different shades of a color and

            A rounded object, as for example a fuselage will have different shades of white from top to bottom, because of the different amount of light it gets.

            check the histogram - 2 examples:





            Make it look like this:




            The histogram is not the holy grail, but it gives you a very good hint. We as screeners won't write a comment, everytime we reject a photo for contrast, if it is that easy to check by yourself.

            Gerardo
            My photos on Flickr www.flickr.com/photos/geridominguez

            Comment


            • #7
              Gerardo,

              the contrast rejection is the only one which is still ambiguous - unlike over exposed / over sharpened etc. To have a reason which has both a too much & a too little comment is misleading. Photographers will go for the 'middle ground' and a clue as to which way to correct an image would be helpful. Would it be that difficult to amend the rejection wording? Are most of the contrast rejections for too little or too much ? I would suspect they are for too little contrast (i think mine are despite setting white point but the rejection reason does not say)

              Comment


              • #8
                It's not just a "too much" or "too little" contrast problem. It can be an overall problem with the contrast. See my examples: what would you say? too much or too little contrast? We simply say "there's a problem with the contrast", meaning "please check the photo and perhaps the histogram and look what's wrong".

                It's similar to the "bad centering/framing" rejection. Is the aircraft to high, or too low, or too far left, too far right? We don't tell you, we simply say, there's somethign wrong.

                If we were to add every wrong detail, it would certainly be user friendly, but also time consuming for us.

                Gerardo
                My photos on Flickr www.flickr.com/photos/geridominguez

                Comment


                • #9
                  Gerardo,

                  why not just say that there is a problem with contrast rather than too much or too little ? The rejection reason wording still implies that either by adding / reducing contrast it will solve the problem when in fact it may not necessarily do so.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Paul people seem to take the rejection comments far too literally. They should be used for guidance purposes only. If you get a contrast rejection it infers there is a problem with your levels, if you get a 'dark' rejection you still have a problem with your levels. The wording of the rejection is just to point you in the right direction not to tell you what to do exactly.

                    Jid

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Jid,

                      with a 'dark' rejection it is obvious what needs to be done it whereas it is not so with a rejection reason that suggests either end of the same element needs adjustment. Oversharpening / soft are opposite ends of the single element yet each has its own rejection reason. Is it worth considering a minor reword of the contrast rejection message to remove the too much / too little and just state 'there is a problem with the contrast'. It would still not be a particularly helpful message but then neither is too much / too little contrast when either could be the reason.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        You got to get rid of the idea, that every error can be fixed. A contrast rejection can often be fixed by adjusting the histogram, as has been explained above by Gerardo, But there are cases when this is not enough. Thewn you might be able to correct it by using curves, but even after this it might be that the origianl simply can not be saved.

                        For example you take a pic on a foggy day, it might be the case that too much information as been lost by the fog to get the pic acceptable.

                        Perhaps this helps :

                        http://www.seahawk.gmxhome.de/contrastrejct.pdf
                        Last edited by seahawk; 2008-01-08, 16:28.
                        My photo editing guide - updated and improved Feb. 2010
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                        • #13
                          ^^ Nice document Stefan!

                          cheers, Pamela

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by seahawk
                            Yes, it has for me, thanks Stefan for going to the effort of explaining histogram.

                            Murt.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by seahawk
                              You got to get rid of the idea, that every error can be fixed. A contrast rejection can often be fixed by adjusting the histogram, as has been explained above by Gerardo, But there are cases when this is not enough. Thewn you might be able to correct it by using curves, but even after this it might be that the origianl simply can not be saved.

                              For example you take a pic on a foggy day, it might be the case that too much information as been lost by the fog to get the pic acceptable.

                              Perhaps this helps :

                              http://www.seahawk.gmxhome.de/contrastrejct.pdf
                              very interesting... thanks a lot.
                              I did not know if I could move those bars at the histogram in PS.

                              regards!
                              _______________________________

                              Will I ever repeat this?

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