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  • overexposed

    The following photo was rejected. Reason: overexposed.

    I looked to the histogram and in my opnion the photo is not overexposed.

    So I apealed it.

    I get the following answer:


    Your appeal for photo id 1731762 has been processed and has been rejected.
    Admin Comments >> There are parts were all detail has been lost. Those are not pure
    white, but we all know that this can be corrected in editing, yet teh detail loss
    remains



    What does he mean by: Corrected in editing. And where is the photo overxposed and the loss of details?
    Please give me your opinion, so I can learn more about this subject.








  • #2
    Engine is a touch overexposed, in photoshop all you need to do is adjust the levels slightly and that should bring it back.


    Comment


    • #3
      So, only a little part is overexposed. By adjusting the levels, I am afraid the whole photo wil become underexposed.

      It is a pity that for such a little part of the airplane, the whole photo is rejected.

      Comment


      • #4
        Paul can we see the original ? for me it's not only a small part but the whole fuselage who suffers from a loss of detail due to overexposition.

        Alex

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Paul Stam
          So, only a little part is overexposed. By adjusting the levels, I am afraid the whole photo wil become underexposed.

          It is a pity that for such a little part of the airplane, the whole photo is rejected.
          Do you know how to use masks? They can be very helpful for situations like this.


          Comment


          • #6
            I would say that the area around the fuselage windows might also have been oversexposed in the original file, there is very little detail there in the white areas.
            My photo editing guide - updated and improved Feb. 2010
            My Nikon D100,D200,D300, D800, D7200 basic spotting settings guide
            ACIG - the best resource for military aviation information

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            • #7
              Hi, Eric Daniel Smith

              No I don't know how to use masks


              Paul



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              • #8
                Originally posted by Paul Stam
                Hi, Eric Daniel Smith

                No I don't know how to use masks


                Paul



                In a nutshell, a mask allows you to make basic adjustments to only small areas of an image, rather than the whole. You make the adjustment, make the mask, and then use the paint tool to either paint the mask away over parts of the image that don't need to be adjusted (Called a "Reveal All" mask because when applied, it shows the editing done on the entire image), or you could use the mask to paint in an adjustment (Called a "Hide All" mask because when applied, it hides the editing and you have to paint it in).

                The mask you'll want to use for this is the "Hide All" mask, because only a small portion of the photo needs touching up. The easiest way for me to do that would be going to Layer > Duplicate Layer on the background layer, so you can do all your editing on a separate layer (easy to clean up mistakes that way). Then, go to Layer > New Adjustment Layer > Levels and play with the histogram until you can get the detail back in the overexposed areas. Next, while working on the "Levels" layer (It's the one highlighted in the Layer window and has the paintbrush in the box on the left of it) go to Layers > Merge Down, followed immediately by Layers > Add Layer Mask > Hide All. You'll notice that all your editing seems to dissappear. To get it back, click on the paintbrush, select a reasonable size, and the color White (has to be white). Then on the top go to the Opacity box and put in about 60%, with a 60% Flow.

                Then, run the paintbrush over the affected areas that you just fixed, and you'll see that you are effectively "painting on" your editing.

                Good luck.


                Comment


                • #9
                  Eric,

                  Thank you for your explanation. I shall try it.


                  Comment

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