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  • From RAW...

    Excuse what must be a basic question (from someone totally new to digital) but; having been advised to shoot in RAW, once I get the images from the camera and adjust them in Photoshop, am I right in thinking TIFF is the preferred format to then save them in, perhaps for future cropping/printing/uploading?

  • #2
    Hi there, to save images during a workflow TIFF is great as it doesn't cost quality or very little. For upload images need to be in high quality JPEG.
    Hope that helps
    Ryan

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    • #3
      If you intend to save for more processing then use TIFF.

      Otherwise, if the image is satisfactory to you for upload then save in PS with a quality value of 12. (12 is the maximum in PS. Be careful though because a value of 11 will also say "Maximum"...and it isn't. )

      Format options=Baseline "Standard"
      If it 'ain't broken........ Don't try to mend it !

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      • #4
        Originally posted by brianw999 View Post
        If you intend to save for more processing then use TIFF.

        Otherwise, if the image is satisfactory to you for upload then save in PS with a quality value of 12. (12 is the maximum in PS. Be careful though because a value of 11 will also say "Maximum"...and it isn't. )

        Format options=Baseline "Standard"

        Thank you so much not my question but I learn something new everday.

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        • #5
          Photos must be in the JPEG (with extension .jpg) format to upload to this site.(if you mean that)TIFF won't work here.

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          • #6
            Just when you think you're getting a handle on the digital palaver along comes a spanner...

            I recently watched a video tutorial thing on converting RAW images in Elements (foolishly, one might say) as I'm more than likely going to opt for Elements when I get my own PC in the next month or so.

            Anyway, long one short; the DNG format featured and, on further reading, there seems to be some debate about it's usefulness. I think it may make a useful backup possibility (in a 'belt& braces' way), in having both NEF and DNG files on a disc/HD. Any thoughts?

            Other than that many thanks for your responses so far, all very useful.

            Incidentally, the video was in/on(?) an online magazine called Better Digital Photography. Not sure I like reading a magazine in this way, but you don't get video in the paper ones.

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            • #7
              What software do you use?

              DNG (Digital Negative) is Adobe's solution to this conundrum. It preserves the RAW data. Now - I'm sceptical of these kinds of solutions, and I'm more trusting of the original RAW files produced by the camera.

              I have another method, I archive the original 14-bit RAW files, and a PSD edit (which references the RAW NEF files) and the XMP file.

              How? Not too difficult actually. You'll need to have Photoshop CS3 or CS4. I'm using CS4 as part of Adobe CS4 Master Collection.

              In Adobe Camera Raw, I open the images as a 16bit smart object. All edits like colour adjustment (white balance) and removal of dust spots are done within Camera Raw, along with making the image straight. Brightness / contrast can also be edited here too.

              By doing this, you preserve the RAW image as a smart object so you can readily make changes during your editing to basic settings like white balance without needing to start again. You just double click the smart object - which will open Camera Raw.

              So if the screeners reject your image for incorrect white balance, or something else very mundane - you can easily correct this without doing a new edit (improving the consistency of your editing).

              After the image is opened in Photoshop proper, select the smart layer and then you are free to apply filters for sharpening and noise reduction. These are smart-filters, so they are non-destructive. Similarly, resizing the image is non-destructive - and you can resize the image down, and then up again to the original size without quality loss. Noise reduction (which I do using Nik Dfine 2.0 plugin) is also non-destructive and can be freely adjusted once applied.

              I find this to be the most productive workflow.

              And I much prefer this to TIFF images - because I still have the original RAW features preserved, and any edits you do are not permanent - you can always adjust or reverse your changes.

              As others have said, for uploading to these kinds of sites, you must export your image as JPEG format with highest quality.

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