Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Rejection Help Please

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Rejection Help Please

    I got 5 more photos rejected today..

    These got rejected for undersharpened, does this look undersharpened? They looks fine to me...

    http://www.jetphotos.net/viewreject_b.php?id=4677186
    http://www.jetphotos.net/viewreject_b.php?id=4677189
    http://www.jetphotos.net/viewreject_b.php?id=4677200

    Completely disagree with this one... And so what about backlighting?
    http://www.jetphotos.net/viewreject_b.php?id=4677184

    "Overprocessed"
    http://www.jetphotos.net/viewreject_b.php?id=4677197

    Thanks guys.

  • #2
    Originally posted by BCPTF View Post
    I got 5 more photos rejected today..

    These got rejected for undersharpened, does this look undersharpened? They looks fine to me...

    http://www.jetphotos.net/viewreject_b.php?id=4677186
    http://www.jetphotos.net/viewreject_b.php?id=4677189
    http://www.jetphotos.net/viewreject_b.php?id=4677200

    Completely disagree with this one... And so what about backlighting?
    http://www.jetphotos.net/viewreject_b.php?id=4677184

    "Overprocessed"
    http://www.jetphotos.net/viewreject_b.php?id=4677197

    Thanks guys.

    Harrison,

    I'm sorry to say that I have to agree with the screeners on these photos. They are all slightly undersharpened, though not terribly so and a little work on the ones rejected for only that reason could improve them for future acceptance. There are many good tutorials and tips about sharpening techniques on this site and in general online so I would suggest that you do some searches (beginning in this forum) for help on how to effectively sharpen your photos.Then try the different techniques you come across to see which gives you the best result. Often in this forum I have read that a photographer should crop/re-size the photo first, add any other post-processing required, and finally sharpen last. That sequence works fine if you are using a camera with a full frame sensor, but for cameras with smaller sensors such as 4/3 or compact zoom types I have found that it works best for me if I post-process first, then sharpen, and finally crop/re-size as the final step. You will need to experiment in order to find the sequence that works best with your own equipment.

    Here is one of your photos with some additional sharpening, a bit of brightening at the forward fuselage, and a very small mid-range change in the levels...

    78755_1410742761-3


    Back-lit shots are almost automatically rejected here unless they are an unusually rare or important shot. That's partly because back-lit shots are simply less aesthetic, but also because the site does sell prints (with the photographers permission of course) and back-lit shots simply do not print well. Try altering your shooting position as the sun moves in the sky during the day to get the best possible lighting. Here in my area the runways tend to be aligned into the sun for a good portion of the day and it is common to need to move from one side of the approach course to the other as the sun moves. Or to simply only shoot at the times of the day when the sun is in an advantageous position. The underexposed likely results from having your camera's metering reading the entire frame. Spot metering would give you a properly exposed aircraft, but would leave the sky overexposed and likely blown out in all white. Try setting your camera's metering to center-weighted, which should help keep shots like that one at proper exposure levels.

    The shot rejected for over-processing does look over-saturated somewhat. You might try toning down the saturation a bit and resubmitting that one. (With additional sharpening as well.) The reds are practically glowing in that shot, which is almost a sure sign of over-saturation in any shot. It might make the photo sort of pop appealingly to the eye, but again, it won't print well that way, and that is something the screeners have to keep in mind when they are reviewing your shots. Also on this shot the flaps and some other portions of the aircraft seem overexposed, the white nearly blown out, and this may have resulted from over-brightening an overall underexposed shot. Again, this is a case where better use of the curves function might have been able to result in an acceptable shot.

    Not what you wanted to hear, I know, but I hope it helps. Truth is that all but the back-lit shot could likely be improved to acceptable levels. Don't get discouraged, keep in mind that this is a learning process and keep working on it.

    Comment

    Working...
    X