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  • Saturation & Hue

    Hello,

    During last days, I have received some rejections due to Saturation / Hue reasons (For example this one: http://www.jetphotos.net/viewreject_b.php?id=5001269).

    As I realized, this is often my problem, I made a decision to ask you for some help and tips.

    Is there any chance to detect that saturation and hue are not correct during postprocessing? Like histogram maybe?

    Let's say, that the plane on link is reddish. What is then proper way to repairt it in photoshop? I can use Hue/Saturation panel and change hue, Saturation and Lightness in PS - is this correct way to fix this kind of problem?

    I am sorry for so many questions, but on this colors topic I am (at the moment) lost.

    Thank you for responses.

  • #2
    Ok, maybe the question was not set correctly.

    Let's say, we have 2 photos. First one is rejected due to Saturation / Hue. Histogram shows this:



    Second one was accepted with this situation:



    Now, the question is - was the first photo rejected because of hight red part on right side of the graph?

    Thank you for comments

    Comment


    • #3
      Sorry, but I don't screen histograms, but pictures. It would be far better, if you could show the photos in question.
      My photos on Flickr www.flickr.com/photos/geridominguez

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by LX-A343 View Post
        Sorry, but I don't screen histograms, but pictures. It would be far better, if you could show the photos in question.
        Ok, sorry for that. Photo with bad color is here:

        http://www.jetphotos.net/viewreject_b.php?id=5016199

        Comment


        • #5
          The screener left you a note, which you can see in the screening mail. The "color" rejection was because of the red color cast.
          My photos on Flickr www.flickr.com/photos/geridominguez

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by LX-A343 View Post
            The screener left you a note, which you can see in the screening mail. The "color" rejection was because of the red color cast.
            Yes, I know that. And to prevent this situation in the future, I was curious, if this red color cast is signalized on colors histogram on the right side via "red cast".

            I wanted to know it, because actually I don't know, how to check if colors are good or bad during editing process. I found some articles, but still unsure. For brightness and contrast, I am able to make checks on histogram and to change values, but on colors... I am not able yet.

            Maybe you can recommend some articles?

            And thank you for your replies, I appreciative it.

            Comment


            • #7
              I would like to ask a question about this rejection reason "Obstructing Objects / Foreground Clutter" for this photo...
              http://www.jetphotos.net/viewreject_b.php?id=5016788

              Also, the problem with the "intrusive watermark" has occured right after the ...upgrade of the site or the movement to the new server. I have actually checked "dark" and "very soft" watermark.

              Maybe the programmers/developers should take a look to this problem.

              THNX

              Sotiris


              https://www.jetphotos.com/photographer/29739

              Comment


              • #8
                Hi Marian,

                Histograms can be invaluable in correcting colour and your first example really shows why. If we take the first rejected photo and look at the histogram you can see pronounced red peaks sitting to the right of the white luminosity peaks. The white bits of the histogram show you the three colour channels summed, so if you see a colour sticking out to the right of a luminosity peak on the right side of the graph there's a good chance your image has a corresponding colour cast in the highlights. A colour sticking out to the side of a peak in the middle indicates a colour cast in the mid tones, one to the left indicates one in the shadows. Colour casts in the highlights are typically the most noticeable so correcting for that side of the histogram often works best.

                Note how different this, the original...



                ...Is to this, which has had a very quick 5 second correction:



                It isn't always possible to achieve the 'perfect technical' histogram, and sometimes that isn't what you want anyway; an orange/red sunset shot for example relies on the image being heavy in those colours so adjusting to make the histogram look 'right' would ruin the effect of the image. For probably 90% of standard daylight shots though, if you correct so the histogram doesn't have a pronounced red or blue bit sticking out to the right side you'll be somewhere about right.
                Seeing the world with a 3:2 aspect ratio...

                My images on Flickr

                Comment


                • #9
                  Hello Paul,

                  thank you for your answer - this is exactly what I needed to know. Color histogram is more clear for me now. I will try to correct another photo with wrong colors to check if I am able to do so

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    So I finished some editing and I think the result is not so bad... from original photo:



                    I turned to this one:



                    I see that histogram shows better colors on the second.

                    Thank you again Paul for your great advice.

                    Comment

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