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  • Rejected for soft

    I noticed on most of my pictures that I attempted to upload to Jetphotos are all mostly rejected for being soft. I don't know whether this photo should be appealed or should be edited once more. Any feedback on this picture? Especially where the soft spots are.
    http://www.jetphotos.net/viewreject_b.php?id=5206844

  • #2
    The photo is definitely soft, partly also due to the JPG compression. Best visible on the windows and other edges.
    My photos on Flickr www.flickr.com/photos/geridominguez

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    • #3
      Originally posted by AeroBlue View Post
      I noticed on most of my pictures that I attempted to upload to Jetphotos are all mostly rejected for being soft. I don't know whether this photo should be appealed or should be edited once more. Any feedback on this picture? Especially where the soft spots are.
      http://www.jetphotos.net/viewreject_b.php?id=5206844
      As Gerardo said, whole aircraft is soft, though if the original image is sharp, a better edit may make it acceptable. Hard to say without seeing the original.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by dlowwa View Post
        As Gerardo said, whole aircraft is soft, though if the original image is sharp, a better edit may make it acceptable. Hard to say without seeing the original.
        I think found the problem. It turns out I was sharpening the image before resizing the image to 1200x900, which rendered the sharpness applied before basically useless. A simple mistake that I could've known earlier. Also, any tips for sharpening an image?

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        • #5
          Originally posted by AeroBlue View Post
          I think found the problem. It turns out I was sharpening the image before resizing the image to 1200x900, which rendered the sharpness applied before basically useless. A simple mistake that I could've known earlier. Also, any tips for sharpening an image?
          If you are using photoshop, what I do is create a duplicate layer and apply unsharp mask (Filter ->sharpen ->unsharp mask). The amount of sharpening varies between every photo, but as a baseline, try amount 75, radius 0.7 and threshold 2, and play with the settings from there. Then if you see jagged/oversharp edges use the eraser tool over those areas so they go back to the original layer. You may also want to avoid sharpening the sky or other unwanted areas.

          From my experience screeners are much more likely to give an undersharpened rejection than an oversharpen. I can't recall the last time I had an oversharpen rejection! BUT be very careful of oversharpening, because once you oversharpen the photo, it cannot be recovered and you might have to start over again.

          Good luck!

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          • #6
            That is not because of the screeners, but because of the normal editing process. If you re-size a pic most re-sampling methods create bit of softness, which needs to be corrected with a bit of sharpening even when the 100% original was pin sharp. Many people seem to not know this. To create an over-sharp picture you usually must add too much sharpening, so we see way less of those than of the soft pics.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by AeroBlue View Post
              I think found the problem. It turns out I was sharpening the image before resizing the image to 1200x900, which rendered the sharpness applied before basically useless. A simple mistake that I could've known earlier. Also, any tips for sharpening an image?
              It's all down to your workflow and when you perform each stage. My workflow is as follows ......

              1. Level the original.
              2. Crop to size.
              3. Check for and remove any dustspots.
              4. Adjust both ends of the luminosity histogram.
              5. Create a background layer and sharpen using USM set to 50-0.2-0. Stop and go back one step if you see jaggies appear.
              6. Delete the sky area and flatten the image. This will remove any sharpening artefacts from the sky.
              7. Save at maximum resolution.

              This is my basic workflow. If you choose your best original image you should not have to fiddle around any more.
              The most important thing is to make sure that the original is properly exposed. If you start with a good shot then you won't have to do much processing.
              Oh yes, one more thing. If you are a Nikon user make sure that "D Lighting" is disabled in your camera. That is the main cause of haloes.
              Last edited by brianw999; 2016-03-23, 11:01.
              If it 'ain't broken........ Don't try to mend it !

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