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  • Over-processed/bad post-processing?

    Hello this is my first post in here as this is one rejection that has me baffled. It say the reason is "overprocessed/bad post-processing". In what respect does this mean? Especially as, due to the excellent conditions that day, the only adjustments applied are a lens correction, a couple of spots removed, and a very mild tweak on the tone curve?

    http://www.jetphotos.net/viewreject_b.php?id=5617972

  • #2
    Originally posted by Beaufighter View Post
    Hello this is my first post in here as this is one rejection that has me baffled. It say the reason is "overprocessed/bad post-processing". In what respect does this mean? Especially as, due to the excellent conditions that day, the only adjustments applied are a lens correction, a couple of spots removed, and a very mild tweak on the tone curve?

    http://www.jetphotos.net/viewreject_b.php?id=5617972
    Hi, I rejected that one. If you check your screening results email, there should be a message explaining the rejection a little more. The message said "Visible editing halos." These are quite obvious in this image and were the reason for the rejection. They are most obvious around the tail and wing, where the sky is dramatically brighter than the immediately surrounding areas. This is likely the result of use of the shadow/highlight, clarity, or other similar tool. If you didn't use any such tool when processing, then the effect was introduced either by in-camera settings if you're shooting jpeg only, or in the RAW conversion process.

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    • #3
      Could also be that the halo's are caused by the lens correction that was applied.

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      • #4
        Thanks for the replies. I hadn't previously noticed that or been aware it was a problem. I had been considering an appeal, but now think that returning to the original RAW file and starting again (while figurimg out where that came from) looks a better bet

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        • #5
          Could I ask for some help? Having reset the original RAW file the 'halo' is visible on it. That is the original unprocessed RAW file with nothing done to it (reset in lightroom). It appears to be a natural glow of reflected sunlight. I hate manipulating images away from their original look so what should i do with his as i think its a lovely pic capturing the twinkle of the landing light?

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          • #6
            Try creating a duplicate layer first.
            Now apply any processing needed for the aircraft.
            Next, select the sky and delete it. This should delete any haloes created in processing. Be careful to delete along the skyline.
            Flatten the image and save at max resolution.

            If there are still haloes then it means that they are part of the original RAW file and there is nothing to be done to them.
            If it 'ain't broken........ Don't try to mend it !

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            • #7
              Originally posted by brianw999 View Post
              Try creating a duplicate layer first.
              Now apply any processing needed for the aircraft.
              Next, select the sky and delete it. This should delete any haloes created in processing. Be careful to delete along the skyline.
              Flatten the image and save at max resolution.

              If there are still haloes then it means that they are part of the original RAW file and there is nothing to be done to them.
              Thanks, tried that and the halo does seem to be far less visible. Will re-submit it and wait to see what happens

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Beaufighter View Post
                Could I ask for some help? Having reset the original RAW file the 'halo' is visible on it. That is the original unprocessed RAW file with nothing done to it (reset in lightroom). It appears to be a natural glow of reflected sunlight. I hate manipulating images away from their original look so what should i do with his as i think its a lovely pic capturing the twinkle of the landing light?
                I find it extremely unlikely those are a natural effect. We see them quite often in screening, and they are always caused by post-processing. I'd be happy to take a look at the RAW file if you want to contact me privately to send it so I can see if it isn't possible to produce an edit without the halos.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by dlowwa View Post
                  I find it extremely unlikely those are a natural effect. We see them quite often in screening, and they are always caused by post-processing. I'd be happy to take a look at the RAW file if you want to contact me privately to send it so I can see if it isn't possible to produce an edit without the halos.
                  The editing process i followed for the one you rejected certainly exacerbated the effect, on the RAW file its much less obvious, but still present. I have managed to do an edit where its about *as* visible as it is on the RAW image, and thats currently in the queue.

                  I'm happy to contact you privately to send you the RAW file though, excuse my ignorance as a novice here, but how do i do that?

                  edit to add, i figured that out, np.

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                  • #10
                    I guess I got the same problem about the halos. After I add Nikon D7200 to my new gear, I found any halos when I equalize the "Original" picture (also JPG & NEF) before I start any editing picture. Any option I forget to turn off like "D-Lightning" ?

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                    • #11
                      D-Lighting is most likely the reason for halos - I had the same observation on shots I recently got rejected.
                      D-Lighting is handy at times but not for planespotting.
                      When converting a Raw via in-camera menu, D-Lighting can be reset to zero (not sure whether any off-camera software could do that too). That might save your shot.
                      .

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                      • #12
                        I just know new feature "clarify" in picture control option of D7200 that maybe have an effect "halo" to picture if it activate.

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