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Raihan Ahmed - Editing Advice

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  • gravios
    replied
    The interior of your high-end camera really is a veritable dust magnet. Every single time you swap lenses you?ˉre effectively inviting particles of dust to swirl right in and stick, thanks to the electrostatic charge the inner of your camera carries, with the mirror, body chamber, and also the camera?ˉs sensor. Even as it?ˉs less than ideal to get dust anywhere contained in the body of the camera, truly the only time that it turns into a real nuisance happens when it clings on the sensor and appears for your photos.

    After the dust is on your sensor it rarely moves; the best way to banish the gray dots and black spots on your future pictures is always to clean the sensor. Everyone seems to be completely freaked out by the very idea of undertaking an extremely task, believing the fact that sensor is significantly too delicate for mere mortals to touch. We assure you that cleaning your camera?ˉs sensor is not merely easy and almost entirely risk-free (when done patiently and with the proper tools, surely), but which it?ˉs downright economical.

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  • LH-B744
    replied
    Originally posted by brianw999 View Post
    I'm lucky in that my wife bought me a D7000 body........and then she bought me a second one ! I cannot remember the last time I changed a lens.....

    .....but I still get the occasional dust spot !
    That's what a wife is good for. We should request that, if necessary. Share one of my hobbies. You don't have to request that. You lucky one.

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  • Petertenthije
    replied
    Originally posted by brianw999 View Post
    ....but the best solution is Eclipse cleaning fluid and swabs.
    Read your camera's manual before using exclipse cleaning fluid. For some camera's you should stick to "dry cleaning".

    I have a Canon 7D mk1. This camera has a automated cleaning setting. Someone explained me the sensor has some kind of special coating that can be damaged when using fluid based cleaning. Something that was never a problem for my older 30D and 10D which of course do not have the automated cleaning.

    In fairnes though, the 7D's cleaning feature works brilliantly. Even after taking it into a sand pit with helicopters flying around I had no noticable dust spots! And that's with the infamous 100-400L dustpump!

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  • brianw999
    replied
    Originally posted by Raihan Ahmed View Post
    The worst part of photo editing is the removal of DUST SPOTS, I damn hate to do this :'(
    Easy short cut automation explained here if you use photoshop.... http://forums.jetphotos.net/showthre...l=1#post579016

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  • paulc
    replied
    always turn the camera off before changing lenses

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  • dlowwa
    replied
    Originally posted by Raihan Ahmed View Post
    But my question is I didn't shoot it on RAW,now how can I correct dark corners?
    Hi,

    If you're using Photoshop, then Filter -> Lens Correction -> Vignette

    However, if you've already used 'anti-vignette' why don't you just follow the same steps?

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  • Raihan Ahmed
    replied
    Yes, I may have used too much anti-vignette when I saw dark corners.
    But my question is I didn't shoot it on RAW,now how can I correct dark corners?

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  • brianw999
    replied
    Vignetting normally causes a darkening of the corners but this one has light corners....and I haven't got a clue how it happened unless you have used too much anti vignette.

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  • Raihan Ahmed
    replied
    Vignetting

    Didn't do any vignetting here,but don't know how it got vignetting effect. I think I should've shot on RAW. Am I right?

    http://www.jetphotos.net/viewreject_b.php?id=5120498

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  • Raihan Ahmed
    replied
    The worst part of photo editing is the removal of DUST SPOTS, I damn hate to do this :'(

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  • brianw999
    replied
    The act of zooming a lens acts like a pump and can suck dust in.

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  • Felipe Garcia
    replied
    Originally posted by Raihan Ahmed View Post
    Well that means dusts can enter the sensor even if we don't change lenses frequently!
    Yeah. Unless the lens is completely dustproof you will get dust in. The Canon 100-400L was the source of many complaints regarding this, not so much nowadays, maybe because the self-cleaning sensors make this problem less of a nightmare.

    I still shoot with an original EOS 1DS from time to time and that camera is a real dust magnet.

    Leave a comment:


  • Raihan Ahmed
    replied
    Originally posted by brianw999 View Post
    I'm lucky in that my wife bought me a D7000 body........and then she bought me a second one ! I cannot remember the last time I changed a lens.....

    .....but I still get the occasional dust spot !
    Well that means dusts can enter the sensor even if we don't change lenses frequently!

    Leave a comment:


  • brianw999
    replied
    I'm lucky in that my wife bought me a D7000 body........and then she bought me a second one ! I cannot remember the last time I changed a lens.....

    .....but I still get the occasional dust spot !

    Leave a comment:


  • Raihan Ahmed
    replied
    Thanks a lot Brian and Gerardo for your valuable suggestions
    I change my lenses frequently as I have only one body but four lenses,I think this is the prime reason for which my camera sensor is suffering from dust spots. From now I need to be careful while changing the lens unless I'm getting a new body.

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