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Raihan Ahmed - Editing Advice

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  • Raihan Ahmed
    replied
    Originally posted by LX-A343 View Post
    The photo is already in the queue. We will screen it, when its time has come. If you want us to pre-screen a photo, please post it here BEFORE uploading.
    Thanks a lot.
    Well understood.

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  • LX-A343
    replied
    Originally posted by Raihan Ahmed View Post
    The photo is already in the queue. We will screen it, when its time has come. If you want us to pre-screen a photo, please post it here BEFORE uploading.

    Leave a comment:


  • Raihan Ahmed
    replied
    Originally posted by dlowwa View Post
    Honestly, most of the time when checking the horizon, the background vertical references are used, and they are too small to for any tool to be used reliably (and if you magnify enough, pretty much everything will look straight, since the whole image is based on square pixels). In the rare case you're trying to measure the actual horizon, any tool that creates a perfectly straight line can be used. I use the cropping tool myself in that situation.
    hope the horizon is okay here?
    https://www.jetphotos.com/viewqueued_b.php?id=7235914

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  • dlowwa
    replied
    Originally posted by Raihan Ahmed View Post
    Facing a lot of problem while leveling the horizon, specailly when the structures in the background are leaning themself.
    Is there any tool or plugin to check horizon more clearly?
    Except Ruler tool is Photoshop.

    Thanks in advance
    Honestly, most of the time when checking the horizon, the background vertical references are used, and they are too small to for any tool to be used reliably (and if you magnify enough, pretty much everything will look straight, since the whole image is based on square pixels). In the rare case you're trying to measure the actual horizon, any tool that creates a perfectly straight line can be used. I use the cropping tool myself in that situation.

    Leave a comment:


  • Raihan Ahmed
    replied
    Raihan Ahmed - Editing Advice

    Facing a lot of problem while leveling the horizon, specailly when the structures in the background are leaning themself.
    Is there any tool or plugin to check horizon more clearly?
    Except Ruler tool is Photoshop.

    Thanks in advance

    Leave a comment:


  • PMN
    replied
    Originally posted by Majky737 View Post
    Thanks for nice explanation Paul Helped a lot.
    Glad it helped!

    Leave a comment:


  • Majky737
    replied
    Thanks for nice explanation Paul Helped a lot.

    Leave a comment:


  • PMN
    replied
    Originally posted by Raihan Ahmed View Post
    Hi Paul many thanks for your help!
    It's really informative
    You're very welcome, Raihan!

    Leave a comment:


  • Raihan Ahmed
    replied
    Originally posted by PMN View Post
    Yes it can, you just need to be looking at the correct histogram and understand how to read it.

    The RGB histogram for that image is showing a significant red peak to the right of the graph. The white information is Luminosity which is the sum of all three colour channels, if you see blue sticking out to the right of the white then you'll almost certainly have a blue colour cast in your highlights, similarly if you see red to the right of white then you'll have a red cast in your highlights. You'll often notice a colour cast in the highlights of an image more than in the mid tones and shadows so that's a good place to start with colour correction.



    This is only a very quick example so it isn't an absolute indication of how the colours should look, but you can see the red isn't pushed out so far to the right from the white Luminosity information and the whites look more natural. The little red triangle in the top right of the first example is showing the red colour channel is pushed to the max, that's not the case after a small tweak.



    The vast majority of my initial colour correction is done purely on the RGB histogram without even looking at the image and it's usually 95% right, the histogram really is an invaluable tool for more than just spotting overexposure.
    Hi Paul many thanks for your help!
    It's really informative

    Leave a comment:


  • PMN
    replied
    Originally posted by snddim01 View Post
    There's a strong red colour cast which can't be understood by looking at a histogram.
    Yes it can, you just need to be looking at the correct histogram and understand how to read it.

    The RGB histogram for that image is showing a significant red peak to the right of the graph. The white information is Luminosity which is the sum of all three colour channels, if you see blue sticking out to the right of the white then you'll almost certainly have a blue colour cast in your highlights, similarly if you see red to the right of white then you'll have a red cast in your highlights. You'll often notice a colour cast in the highlights of an image more than in the mid tones and shadows so that's a good place to start with colour correction.



    This is only a very quick example so it isn't an absolute indication of how the colours should look, but you can see the red isn't pushed out so far to the right from the white Luminosity information and the whites look more natural. The little red triangle in the top right of the first example is showing the red colour channel is pushed to the max, that's not the case after a small tweak.



    The vast majority of my initial colour correction is done purely on the RGB histogram without even looking at the image and it's usually 95% right, the histogram really is an invaluable tool for more than just spotting overexposure.

    Leave a comment:


  • scbriml
    replied
    Here's a quick fix to show the difference - left side had "Auto Color" applied and +40 on contrast. Looks much better, but still might need a little tweaking:
    Click image for larger version

Name:	AIX adjusted.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	857.6 KB
ID:	1017233

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  • snddim01
    replied
    There's a strong red colour cast which can't be understood by looking at a histogram.

    In simple terms, whites should be pure white, unless the picture is taken when the sun is low in the sky in which case the whites will take on a yellow or red tint. In your picture the angle of shadows show that the sun is high so there should be no unnatural tints.

    The way to check this is to go into (on Photoshop) Image / Adjustments / Saturation and push the saturation slider all the way to the right. Any colour which appears in the whites is likely to be an unwanted cast. Autocolour will sometimes fix this, but otherwise you need to manually remove the cast.

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  • Raihan Ahmed
    replied
    Bad color/contrast help

    Need a help on this rejection.
    Is it suffering from any color cast or over/under saturated?
    How to understand whether a photo is suffering from color cast or not?
    Can this be understood by looking at histogram?
    https://www.jetphotos.com/viewqueued_b.php?id=6088147



    Leave a comment:


  • Eddy
    replied
    Check this tutorial http://content.photojojo.com/tutoria...nsor-cleaning/

    Leave a comment:


  • brianw999
    replied
    Originally posted by gravios View Post
    The interior of your high-end camera really is a veritable dust magnet. Every single time you swap lenses you?ˉre effectively inviting particles of dust to swirl right in and stick, thanks to the electrostatic charge the inner of your camera carries, with the mirror, body chamber, and also the camera?ˉs sensor. Even as it?ˉs less than ideal to get dust anywhere contained in the body of the camera, truly the only time that it turns into a real nuisance happens when it clings on the sensor and appears for your photos.

    After the dust is on your sensor it rarely moves; the best way to banish the gray dots and black spots on your future pictures is always to clean the sensor. Everyone seems to be completely freaked out by the very idea of undertaking an extremely task, believing the fact that sensor is significantly too delicate for mere mortals to touch. We assure you that cleaning your camera?ˉs sensor is not merely easy and almost entirely risk-free (when done patiently and with the proper tools, surely), but which it's downright economical.
    Use sensor wipes and a bottle of Eclipse cleaning fluid. Follow the instructions exactly and you won't have any problems. Before using the wipes and fluid I give the body, with the mirror locked up, a blast from a can of Kenair compressed air. Hold the body and spray can horizontal.
    Last edited by brianw999; 2016-11-16, 11:34.

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