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  • any comments from the non digital

    Can anyone help with this?

    I used Kodak ISO 100 film which I bought because I was unable to get hold of any Fuji product at the time. You can even see the grain on the 6x4 print. I have added a little intensity to the colour but have not sharpened the image or massively enlarged it.

    Any constructive comment welcome, even from the maninden.




  • #2
    cja,

    I am guessing that if your print had grain then you need to find a better processing facility. A 100 ISO film should not have a lot of grain on that size print unless it was improperly processed. Take a magnifying glass to your negative and see if there is visible grain on the negative itself. If not try taking the negative to a place that can do a good scan from the negative alone. Scanning from prints never comes out very well unless you have a really clean print of 8 x 10 inches size or larger. If you plan to shoot on film a lot and want to upload then consider investing in a film scanner so you can scan your negatives or slides yourself.

    I played with your photo a bit, got some improvement by increasing the contrast, and adjusting the hue and saturation a bit then sharpening some and filtering out grain. Sadly it still isn't up to upload standards, but here's what I got...

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    • #3
      Freightdogg

      Thanks for your comments and I can see what a difference saturation and contrast have made. I am amazed at how this has reduced the grain. Having checked the negative as you suggest I find it hard to tell if it has more grain than some of my better quality images. I will test this by having the negatives redeveloped somewhere else.

      I donít have a digital camera, or auto focus for that matter and I usually have negatives scanned onto disk during processing but it didnít happen on this occasion. So I had to use my flatbed scanner which normally manages to do a reasonably good job, as scanners go.

      Oh for a 10D!

      Thanks again.


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      • #4
        My guess: using a dedicated slide or negative scanner (Minolta Scan Dual and the like) will improve the quality. Using slides will increase the quality again. But that's of course a personal decision.

        Gerardo
        My photos on Flickr www.flickr.com/photos/geridominguez

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        • #5
          Here is a scan of the negatives using my flatbed and the adapter supplied. I think this shows the problem to have been a grainy film and poor exposure. I think I had the camera set to 500th/sec and let the camera work out the f/stop, perhaps this was asking too much given the poor conditions at the time. The last shot is clearly the best in terms of exposure, the aircraft had moved into better light.



          Thanks to Gerado for the comments regarding slides, this may be the way to go. I have a few slides like this one below from the seventies which might perhaps be worthy of an upload with the right equipment.




          Thanks guys

          Chris


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          • #6
            Hey Chris,
            I'll go with the above statements, print film is tough to scan. I have boxes of shots that will not ever be seen due to the difficulty in getting them scanned properly.


            I will admit, that when viewing prints, grain is not a big killer for me. I generally take the whole picture into account and judge it from there. Grain used to be a fact of life.

            Nice shots though...

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            • #7
              Jeff,

              Thanks for your comments, they are appreciated.

              Chris


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              • #8
                And that still isn't up to standards, Derf? Christ.

                My recommendation, if that isn't up to standards... Don't even bother. Just keep taking pictures for your own collection.

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                • #9
                  My recommendation, if that isn't up to standards... Don't even bother. Just keep taking pictures for your own collection.
                  If it isn't up to standards it usually goes in the bin, thanks. No attempt has been made to upload the photo that heads up this thread.

                  Those of us who arenít all knowing when it comes to the technicalities of photography, appreciate a little help from those who have greater experience and are prepared to share a little of it. This way the amount of shots going into the "round file" starts to be reduced.
                  Forgive me if I am wrong but I thought that was the purpose of this forum!


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                  • #10
                    Chris,

                    Just for practice I worked over the TriStar shot...



                    Too bad it's dimensionally too small to upload since BA hasn't operated L-1011's for a while now.

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                    • #11
                      OK here's my quick try

                      Check out my photos at jp.net! http://www.jetphotos.net/showphotos.php?userid=613

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                      • #12
                        Freightdogg,

                        What photo editing suite are you using and how do you smooth out the grain so well? Thatís another big improvement on the L1011 picture but you are right, it would be too small to upload. I donít have access to a proper film scanner, so I will have to wait to find out what can be done with this when scanned properly.

                        Thanks to N27015 as well for your efforts with the 747.

                        Cheers

                        Chris


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                        • #13
                          Chris,

                          I use Photoshop Elements for basic processing, Neat Image to reduce grain when required, and in some cases may use Mediachance's ColorCastFX, DCEnhancer, and FilterSIM. The trick is in learning how to evaluate a shot before beginning and then applying whichever editing process is called for. That's one of the reasons I enjoy experimenting with other peoples' photos. My own camera produces images that pretty much all require about the same levels of processing, so the variety of equipment that others use provide more challenges. The more you practice the better you get at it.

                          Oddly enough it was post processing that got me started on uploading photos online. I had a friend who had posted a shot on A-net that was an old shot and had a lot of grain and a very magenta sky. Several other photographers over there had tried to help him improve the shot but I happened to come up with the best version. After he posted it I helped him with a few others and I then got the bug to begin uploading shots of my own.

                          I meant to ask you, all of your shots of the Malaysia 747 show a bit of vignetting. Do you use a teleconverter when you shoot?

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                          • #14
                            Freightdogg,
                            I am glad you use Adobe as a I have decided to ask Santa for this!! At the moment I am using Corel Photo House 5 which came with my flatbed and has been sitting unused on my hard drive for nearly three years. I dusted it off after waking up to what it is shortly after starting to upload to JP Net earlier this summer.

                            As far as vignetting is concerned I do not use a tele-converter. These shots were taken using an Sigma 100-300MF lens, no filters or anything. I must say that I had noticed the same thing but put it down to Kodak film. Having said that, this reminds me of another image using Fuji film that has the same thing I will upload it, see what you think.

                            By the way I have not marked this one as a potential upload in case you are wondering.


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