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Hawaiian to buy 6 A330s, 6 A350s

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  • Hawaiian to buy 6 A330s, 6 A350s

    Definitely surprising, if not shocking news:
    http://biz.yahoo.com/prnews/071128/law128.html?.v=56
    HONOLULU, Nov. 28 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- Hawaiian Airlines today announced agreements with Airbus and engine maker Rolls-Royce to acquire up to 24 new long-range wide-body aircraft as the first step in a phased fleet plan that will replace its current wide-body fleet of 18 aircraft, expand its long-range fleet, and enable it to open new routes to more distant markets on a nonstop basis from Hawaii.

    Hawaiian has signed Memoranda of Understanding with Airbus and Rolls-Royce to acquire six wide-body A330-200 aircraft and six A350XWB (Extra Wide Body)-800 aircraft, with purchase rights for an additional six A330-200s and six A350XWB-800s. The agreements have a total list-price value of approximately $4.4 billion if all of the purchase rights are exercised.

    The first A350XWB-800 will join Hawaiian's fleet in 2017. The wide-body jet will seat 322 passengers in a two-class configuration (First and Coach) and have a range of 69,000 nautical miles, which will give Hawaiian the capability to fly nonstop between Hawaii and Asia, Australasia, the Americas and Europe. The A350 carries 24 percent more passengers and is 20 percent more fuel efficient per seat mile than Hawaiian's current fleet.

    Airbus will deliver the first new A330-200 to Hawaiian in 2012. The wide- body twin-engine, twin-aisle A330-200 will seat 305 passengers in a two-class configuration. With an operating range of 5,500 nautical miles, the A330 can fly significantly farther than Hawaiian's current fleet and will provide the ability to serve all of North America and points in eastern Asia nonstop from Hawaii. In addition, the A330 carries 45 more passengers and is more fuel efficient than Hawaiian's current fleet.
    HNL-Europe nonstop flights, good luck making those work.


  • #2
    I cant wait to see that hawaiian livery on an a350, good news for both hawaiian and airbus.
    Will C.

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    • #3
      I was some sort of quiet sure that Hawaiian would opt for the Boeing 787. Several sources say that Hawaiian wants to fly to Europe (again).
      Regards, IB M87
      http://www.MD-80.com / MD-80.com on facebook https://www.facebook.com/MD80com / MD-80.com on Twitter: https://twitter.com/MD80com

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      • #4
        That's extremely surprising. At least the 717s will still be gracing the skies of the islands.

        Comment


        • #5
          That's extremely surprising. At least the 717s will still be gracing the skies of the islands.
          Yes, indeed it is surprising. Hopefully Hawaiian will retain their eleven Boeing 717s.

          Regards, IB M87
          http://www.MD-80.com / MD-80.com on facebook https://www.facebook.com/MD80com / MD-80.com on Twitter: https://twitter.com/MD80com

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          • #6
            69,000 nautical miles???? are we going to see an around the world flight?
            O'Hare - The Aviation God's greatest creation, or their greatest mistake? you be the judge!

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            • #7
              thats one hell of a long route(s)!

              yes i am a boeing fan, and i know thats a airbus, haha

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              • #8
                Ok, I guess - not that smart of a move though. I am sure that they are getting a great deal from Airbus, but the A350s are just too large for Hawaiian. They make the 767-300s opreate at decent loads (at times), but moving to the A350 - a plane that is much larger - is not that great of a move. I think that they should have choosen smaller aircraft in order to start routes. 787s would have provided great flexibility. The A330s are a great idea (if they choose the A330-200). I wish them the best either way.
                Whatever is necessary, is never unwise.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by AA 1818
                  Ok, I guess - not that smart of a move though. I am sure that they are getting a great deal from Airbus, but the A350s are just too large for Hawaiian. They make the 767-300s opreate at decent loads (at times), but moving to the A350 - a plane that is much larger - is not that great of a move. I think that they should have choosen smaller aircraft in order to start routes. 787s would have provided great flexibility. The A330s are a great idea (if they choose the A330-200). I wish them the best either way.
                  I'm no Airbus fan, but I see why they would want the A350 work for Asian mainland, East coast US, and even Europe flights. I would have loved to see a 787 in HI colors, though.

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                  • #10
                    I often heard that Hawaiian suffered from "low yields" because of the nature of travellers to and from the Hawaiian Islands? Years ago Hawaiian offered flights with Douglas DC-8-62s from Europe via Alaska to Hawaii (if I am correct) but several reasons forced Hawaiian to suspend many long-haul routes due to low yields (not necessary low passenger-loads). I do not have enough information/knowledge about Hawaiian Airlines but I think that the management evaluated the best options for Hawaiian and decided that the A330/350 would fit their needs.

                    For Airbus this is the first sale to Hawaii, isnīt it?

                    Regards, IB M87
                    http://www.MD-80.com / MD-80.com on facebook https://www.facebook.com/MD80com / MD-80.com on Twitter: https://twitter.com/MD80com

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by IberiaMD-87
                      I often heard that Hawaiian suffered from "low yields" because of the nature of travellers to and from the Hawaiian Islands? Years ago Hawaiian offered flights with Douglas DC-8-62s from Europe via Alaska to Hawaii (if I am correct) but several reasons forced Hawaiian to suspend many long-haul routes due to low yields (not necessary low passenger-loads). I do not have enough information/knowledge about Hawaiian Airlines but I think that the management evaluated the best options for Hawaiian and decided that the A330/350 would fit their needs.

                      For Airbus this is the first sale to Hawaii, isnīt it?

                      Regards, IB M87
                      With all leisure destinations, HI tends to be low-yield. Maybe they'll be able to make it work. This is the first Airbus sale to Hawaii to the best of my knowledge.

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                      • #12
                        I guess he will henceforth be known as John Lei hy

                        Chaser

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                        • #13
                          Hawaii is indeed low-yield. Granted, airlines can still make some money due to cargo, but on the pax side, for most Legacy carriers Hawaii service is a place for their Frequent Fliers to burn off mileage and rewards, which is why they usually use their most tightly packed jets to Hawaii (see UA domestic 772s, DL's 764s), and even the Japanese can only make their Hawaii flights work because the use high-capacity 747s for the flights.

                          Besides, with all due respect to HA, if there was a market for nonstop Europe-Hawaii flights, someone would already be flying it, yet nobody does so. And why, because we are talking about routes in excess of 6500nm. That distance usually covers high-yielding routes like JFK-BOM, not low-yield stuff like Hawaii. Granted, you may catch quite a few tourists, but how many people in Europe would actually take a 15-hour flight to Hawaii, when other tropical places like the Caribbean can be reached in half the time? Supreme economics of the A350 or not, I just can't see that working out.

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                          • #14
                            Firstly congrats to Hawaiian and Airbus for brokering this one. Certainly is a bonanza ordering season for A and B and even E & T! Airbus in particular seems to be doing a great job of putting it's problems behind it and getting back on the front foot.

                            I agree it is hard to understand why Hawaiian would need such a large a/c on mostly low yielding routes. But we have to remember it is at least 10 years before the first A350 will be delivered. By then the equations will look very different and the A350 could turn out to be the perfect choice.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by flyingbosshog
                              69,000 nautical miles???? are we going to see an around the world flight?
                              Um, no thats a huge error. The Earth circumference at the Equator is only 25,040 miles.
                              Follow me on Twitter! www.twitter.com/flyingphotog

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