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Crunch Time for Moffett's Hangar One

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  • Crunch Time for Moffett's Hangar One

    From Lenny Siegel:

    Sorry to deluge this list with so many messages recently, but it is
    crunch time. We have won a major half-victory in our effort to save
    Hangar One. We have shown that citizens can make a difference. But we
    must act now to ensure that the hangar remains more than a skeleton, a
    slowly degrading, unusable monument to its past.

    I fear that the decision not to "demolish" Hangar One will lead many
    people to relax at a time when we need to heighten our pressure. We're
    asking the government to spend more at a time of economic hardship.

    Thus far, broadcast news coverage of the Navy's proposal has been
    minimal, so many potential hangar supporters don't yet know what's
    happening. So the first step is to spread the the word. Let your
    friends, families, colleagues, old buddies, etc. know what is happening.
    Forward this message.

    Invite individuals who want to help organize to our (Save Hangar One
    Committee) meeting next Thursday (7:30 pm, August 7, Moffett History
    Museum).

    Bring crowds of Hangar One supporters to the Navy's Tuesday, August 26
    meeting (7 pm at American Legion Post 564, 2120 Walsh Avenue, Santa
    Clara). We asked the Navy to find a larger meeting hall because they had
    to turn our people away in May 2006. They've agreed. Now we have to show
    that large numbers of people are still concerned.

    In my opinion, our most immediate task is to get Hangar One supporters
    to the August 26 meeting. We'll be discussing ways to do that at next
    Thursday's SHOC meeting.

    Beyond that, we'll be discussing strategy. Our goal is clearly to see
    that the Hangar is restored after the siding and roof are removed. To
    what degree do we focus on the Navy? NASA? Environmental regulators (EPA
    and the Water Board)? Historic preservation agencies? Our Congressional
    delegation? In the long run, should we emphasize public education,
    political action, litigation, or fund-raising?

    If you have ideas, I urge you to write them up and send them to this
    list now. If we have an open discussion on the list, we'll be better
    able to make decisions next Thursday.

    There is no doubt in my mind that we can see Hangar One cleaned up,
    restored, and reused - if we continue to educate and organize.

    Lenny


    --


    Lenny Siegel
    Executive Director, Center for Public Environmental Oversight
    a project of the Pacific Studies Center
    278-A Hope St., Mountain View, CA 94041
    Voice: 650/961-8918 or 650/969-1545
    Fax: 650/961-8918

    http://www.cpeo.org
    Support Team Twin Towers: http://teamtwintowers.org/
    The Unofficial JFK Airport 50th Anniversary Page: http://members.tripod.com/~psa188/
    The best slide auction on the net:
    http://www.auctiontransportation.com/sites/psa188/

  • #2
    I'm glad they're keeping it. I've always considered it a landmark. I can actually see it all the way from my house, which is well over 30 miles away, probably 40 or so. And local pilots often use Hangar One as a reference point, everyone knows what it is.

    What do they use it for now though?
    sigpic
    http://www.jetphotos.net/showphotos.php?userid=170

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    • #3
      There are far more important things to organize grassroots campaigns for...


      A hangar? really?

      Comment


      • #4
        Its one of the largest hangars I've ever seen, and very distinctive. It is where they produced all the airships back in the day, and houses a museum. The space shuttle was also vigorously tested in there, various other planes were put through tests there also before delivery, including the 777. Some skunk works projects also saw tests within that hangar. In fact, the new Space Shuttle will suposedly do aerodynamic tests there.

        Obviously, it has importance to enthusists out here. And if they want to save it, all the power to them. How does it harm effect anyone else outside the area if they rally for this or not? Its not like they'd be finding a cure for cancer if they wern't saving the hangar.
        sigpic
        http://www.jetphotos.net/showphotos.php?userid=170

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Leftseat86
          There are far more important things to organize grassroots campaigns for...


          A hangar? really?
          Yes a hanger! What is your point? We have a restored WW2 hanger at YXD that serves as the Alberta Aviation Museum, and the Air Cadets at an airport once identified as the buisiest in North America during the war.
          Slated for demolition several years ago, a small group of dedicated vollunteers aquired the hanger and restored it first.Some of the finest restorative work on vintage aircraft is done here. The Cadets get first hand teaching of flight and learn from both the men who flew them and maintain them all the while surrounded by some of the most wonderful flying machines this area ever saw land here. It also holds fly ins and an air show every Father's Day. Why a hanger?
          I wish this group all the best in thier endeavors and encourage them to ignore the usual nay sayers.
          Who's on first?..........

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Leftseat86
            There are far more important things to organize grassroots campaigns for...


            A hangar? really?
            If it's something they care about then why not?

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Crunk415balla
              Its one of the largest hangars I've ever seen, and very distinctive. It is where they produced all the airships back in the day, and houses a museum. The space shuttle was also vigorously tested in there, various other planes were put through tests there also before delivery, including the 777. Some skunk works projects also saw tests within that hangar. In fact, the new Space Shuttle will suposedly do aerodynamic tests there.

              Obviously, it has importance to enthusists out here. And if they want to save it, all the power to them. How does it harm effect anyone else outside the area if they rally for this or not? Its not like they'd be finding a cure for cancer if they wern't saving the hangar.
              During develoopment of the Pioneer Venus large probe its parachute was drop tested from the ceiling of this hanger.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Crunk415balla
                Its one of the largest hangars I've ever seen, and very distinctive. It is where they produced all the airships back in the day, and houses a museum. The space shuttle was also vigorously tested in there, various other planes were put through tests there also before delivery, including the 777. Some skunk works projects also saw tests within that hangar. In fact, the new Space Shuttle will suposedly do aerodynamic tests there.
                Just wondering where all these tests took place. VP-30's classroom buildings took up almost 2/3rds of the hangar deck. There was just enough room for 4 P-3's at 45 degree parking...
                -Not an Airbus or Boeing guy here.
                -20 year veteran on the USN Lockheed P-3 Orion.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I dunno, according to the folks at the museum thats all fact.
                  sigpic
                  http://www.jetphotos.net/showphotos.php?userid=170

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by P3_Super_Bee
                    VP-30's classroom buildings.....
                    VP-30? How soon we forget....
                    Parlour Talker Extraordinaire

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Vnav
                      VP-30? How soon we forget....
                      Indeed. Cause I really ment VP-31 LOL...
                      -Not an Airbus or Boeing guy here.
                      -20 year veteran on the USN Lockheed P-3 Orion.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Crunk415balla
                        I dunno, according to the folks at the museum thats all fact.
                        Actually, it's part of the truth...but not all of the truth. The tests that you describe all took place at NASA's Ames Research Center, which is right next door to Hangar 1. In fact, NASA currently runs Moffett Federal Airfield (KNUQ), taking over after the Navy pulled out about a decade ago.

                        The hangar was built to house the USS Macon, the US Navy's airship that was responsible for long-range surveillance back in the early 30's. After the Macon was lost during a storm off the California coast in 1935, the Navy used it to house a lighter-than-air squadron of blimps.

                        Today, it sits empty with no-one allowed inside due to the prevalence of PCBs, lead and other toxic contaminants. In fact, if you go inside without shoe coverings, SOP is to destroy the shoes afterwards.

                        NASA did all its testing inside the fence next to Hangar One. There is the world's largest wind tunnel (test section is 80 feet x 120 feet), the world's largest Arc Jet complex, where the Space Shuttle tiles were developed and the Vertical Motion Simulator, where Shuttle pilots practice final approach and rollout in a 6-story high motion simulator that is the most realistic available. In addition to the standard 6-degrees of freedom most simulators have, this sim sits on a platform that moves up and down during the approach, making you feel like you're shooting an approach at KSC!

                        The new Crew Exploration Vehicle (code-name Orion) and the new launch vehicles (Ares-1 and Ares-5) are being wind-tunnel tested here in the 9-foot and 11-foot wind tunnels.

                        Hope this helps. (P.S. In the interest of disclosure...I work at Ames, so I have the benefit of some inside knowledge and have successfully landed the shuttle on my 2 flights in the VMS!)

                        Cheers...Bill
                        It is difficult to produce a television documentary that is both incisive and probing when every twelve minutes one is interrupted by twelve dancing rabbits singing about toilet paper. -Rod Serling

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by FoozBallKing
                          Actually, it's part of the truth...but not all of the truth. The tests that you describe all took place at NASA's Ames Research Center.

                          Cheers...Bill
                          That's what I was thinking. One good thing about the time I spent at Moffet was watching all the NASA aircraft flying.
                          -Not an Airbus or Boeing guy here.
                          -20 year veteran on the USN Lockheed P-3 Orion.

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                          • #14
                            Bill, thanks for the info. Appreciate it.
                            sigpic
                            http://www.jetphotos.net/showphotos.php?userid=170

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