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  • What happens in this situation?

    ...a passenger sees a hostie taking pics while sitting in an engine inlet, snaps their own photos and complains?

    https://gma.yahoo.com/engine-photos-...opstories.html

    Struggling with this one...Seems kind of extremely harmless...

    AND, given change fees and over booking and seat pitch, and cancellation and delay policies, the PR department has to over react to this to give the appearance as if they care about what passengers think?

    IMHO, I'd like to see the airline say, "Yeah, we have a procedure involving multiple safety measures to allow crew to photograph themselves in engine intakes while not on duty."
    Les règles de l'aviation de base découragent de longues périodes de dur tirer vers le haut.

  • #2
    Slow news day...

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    • #3
      Indeed.
      Les règles de l'aviation de base découragent de longues périodes de dur tirer vers le haut.

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      • #4
        News Editor to his correspondants...

        "No news today, get out there and find someones career to ruin".

        Reporters ? I shit 'em.
        If it 'ain't broken........ Don't try to mend it !

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        • #5
          Much ado about nothing as far as I'm concerned, with one possible exception. At my company, we're required to have the "minimum" flight attendant crew--one for every 50 seats or portion thereof as I recall--on the airplane anytime passengers are onboard. Technically a flight attendant isn't even supposed to step outside the door onto the jetway to help an elderly passenger get into a wheelchair or anything like that. With that being said, if this flight attendant was down posing in the engine inlet and left the airplane with less than minimum crew, then there could be an issue. Of course, this is a foreign (to the US) carrier and the rules may be different.

          A personal story about walkarounds and cameras: Several years ago I was doing a walk around on a 757 in Las Vegas and had my camera--the Nikon D300, not a little point-and-shoot, and I was taking some pictures of the airplane. The captain had gone into the terminal and when he came out he said several people asked him about the guy taking the pictures. He told them it was ok since he (I) would be flying the plane. Now, realistically, what kind of information is a terrorist going to glean from taking pictures of the airplane? After all, someone up to no good is probably just going to download the pictures they need from the internet, rather than going to the trouble of gaining access to the ramp so they can take their own. Secondly, a chubby blue-eyed gray-haired guy in a pilot suit really doesn't fit the profile for someone up to no good. Oh, wait, we're not supposed to profile... But I digress and shouldn't try to lead the thread in a different direction.
          The "keep my tail out of trouble" disclaimer: Though I work in the airline industry, anything I post on here is my own speculation or opinion. Nothing I post is to be construed as "official" information from any air carrier or any other entity.

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          • #6
            I don't want to dramatize about the photo in the engine. Nothing to see, keep moving.

            But....

            If this is an acceptable behavior (and it seems that it is, at least the facto, since it seems that every other crew member has an alike photo), I would make it officially acceptable in my airline with things like:

            - Don't do it with passengers on board, boarding or deplaning.
            - After engine photo checklist: Subject and photographer must check for foreign objects accidentally left there (a cellphone, the car keys, sunglasses, etc...)

            --- Judge what is said by the merits of what is said, not by the credentials of who said it. ---
            --- Defend what you say with arguments, not by imposing your credentials ---

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Gabriel View Post
              - Don't do it with passengers on board, boarding or deplaning.
              - After engine photo checklist: Subject and photographer must check for foreign objects accidentally left there (a cellphone, the car keys, sunglasses, etc...)
              Memory items, or just look it up in the QRH?
              Les règles de l'aviation de base découragent de longues périodes de dur tirer vers le haut.

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