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Delta to acquire 20 Embraer E190s and 40 new 737-900ERs upon pilot ratification...

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  • Delta to acquire 20 Embraer E190s and 40 new 737-900ERs upon pilot ratification...

    Full Title: Delta to acquire 20 Embraer E190s and 40 new 737-900ERs upon pilot ratification of tentative agreement

    ATLANTA, June 10, 2015 /PRNewswire/ -- Delta Air Lines (NYSE: DAL) will enter into an aircraft acquisition deal with The Boeing Co. for 20 Embraer E190 aircraft and 40 additional new 737-900ERs upon ratification of a tentative agreement covering more than 12,000 Delta pilots. The tentative agreement was approved for membership ratification today by the Delta Master Executive Council (MEC) of the Air Line Pilots Association (ALPA).

    The tentative agreement provides enhancements to overall pilot compensation—including base pay increases—along with a revision of the airline's profit sharing formula beginning in 2016. Additionally, this accord would secure additional career advancement opportunities for Delta pilots while providing the airline with productivity enhancements and further fleet flexibility across the airline's U.S. domestic system.

    "Our airline's culture of working and winning together has long set Delta apart from others in our industry," said Richard Anderson, Delta's Chief Executive Officer. "This tentative agreement with ALPA reflects the key role and contributions of our pilots in our excellent financial and operational performance."

    The MEC will put the tentative agreement out to pilots for a ratification vote. If approved, the agreement would have an amendable date of Dec. 31, 2018.

    "We fully support the Delta MEC's endorsement of this agreement and are optimistic of its approval by our pilots," Anderson said. "This continues the investments we've made in our people and in our products and services for our customers. These moves will continue to drive the industry-leading performance that has allowed us to return more than $3 billion to shareholders and still reward our employees with industry-leading profit sharing."

    Upon ratification of the agreement, Delta will acquire 20 Boeing-held Embraer E190 aircraft previously operated by another carrier. The E190s will enter mainline Delta service in the fourth quarter of 2016.

    "These 98-seat mainline aircraft will be flown by Delta pilots," Anderson said. "The capability and aptitude of all Delta people has already shown that they are the best in the business at managing a diverse fleet while keeping costs in check and never compromising safety. These cost-efficient aircraft will play a key role as we strive to achieve higher returns for our shareholders, and we thank Boeing for their important partnership."

    The E190 will be deployed on U.S. domestic routes to improve the flying experience for Delta customers and continue the shift of flying away from inefficient 50-seat regional jets as part of the company's successful upgauging strategy.

    Delta will also order an additional 40 new Boeing 737-900ERs, augmenting an existing order of the efficient and reliable aircraft to 140 in total. Delta plans to deploy these aircraft as replacements for other narrowbody aircraft scheduled to retire through 2019.

    http://news.delta.com/2015-06-10-Del...tive-agreement

  • #2
    I know that I have not looked hard, but I've never seen yet in the US airports regional jets of the wing-mounted engines configuration.

    Austral operates like 20 E190 in Argentina (which is quite a big fleet by Arg standards) and I flew in them many times.

    From the passenger experience perspective, sure it is much better than the ERJ and CRJ lines. And if they can fill'em up, sure it's much more cost-efficient to fly 100 than 50 paxs around.

    --- Judge what is said by the merits of what is said, not by the credentials of who said it. ---
    --- Defend what you say with arguments, not by imposing your credentials ---

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    • #3
      You've never seen a 737-100?


      What's old is new again...
      Be alert! America needs more lerts.

      Eric Law

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by elaw View Post
        What's old is new again...
        Indeed.
        Les règles de l'aviation de base découragent de longues périodes de dur tirer vers le haut.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re:

          Originally posted by Gabriel View Post
          I know that I have not looked hard, but I've never seen yet in the US airports regional jets of the wing-mounted engines configuration.
          They've been here for the past several years already.

          Also, is this the first time that a mainline U.S. carrier is operating RJs on its own (without putting them in a regional subsidiary)?

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Foxtrot View Post

            Also, is this the first time that a mainline U.S. carrier is operating RJs on its own (without putting them in a regional subsidiary)?
            It is not. USAir has had -190s for quite a while as has JetBlue.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Foxtrot View Post
              They've been here for the past several years already.

              Also, is this the first time that a mainline U.S. carrier is operating RJs on its own (without putting them in a regional subsidiary)?
              ...and who says an E-170 is an RJ?

              Not disagreeing, just adding that on jets that size, the "RJ" designation begins to blur as the size/capacity gets that much closer to "big-iron" (whatever that is too).

              Fokker-100, 737-100, DC9-15, B-717, A319, yada, yada, whatever...
              Les règles de l'aviation de base découragent de longues périodes de dur tirer vers le haut.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by 3WE View Post
                ...and who says an E-170 is an RJ?

                Not disagreeing, just adding that on jets that size, the "RJ" designation begins to blur as the size/capacity gets that much closer to "big-iron" (whatever that is too).

                Fokker-100, 737-100, DC9-15, B-717, A319, yada, yada, whatever...
                And Fokker F-82.

                Yes, there is no solid line that divides the bottom of the mainline range with the top of the RJ range. That's why Boeing and Airbus are concerned.

                I would not be surprised to see Embraer come with a 150 seats "RJ" in the near future.

                --- Judge what is said by the merits of what is said, not by the credentials of who said it. ---
                --- Defend what you say with arguments, not by imposing your credentials ---

                Comment


                • #9
                  So the RJs are coming from AC via Boeing, and I guess it was a great tag-on to the 737 order.

                  I am sure that they got a steal of a deal, Boeing rids themselves of the Embraers, get some 737 slots filled prior to ramping up of the line for MAX production, and DL gets to wet their beak with a CEO (as mainline) prior to potentially ordering the E-2.

                  I expected more A321s (or an A321LR order), but good to see some 737s getting ordered now.
                  Whatever is necessary, is never unwise.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by AA 1818 View Post
                    So the RJs are coming from AC via Boeing, and I guess it was a great tag-on to the 737 order.
                    Not sure how great a tag-on they were. To start a new type program for only 20 airplanes (100 seaters to boot) seems iffy, but who knows what hands got greased in this deal...

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by ATLcrew View Post
                      Not sure how great a tag-on they were. To start a new type program for only 20 airplanes (100 seaters to boot) seems iffy, but who knows what hands got greased in this deal...
                      I was initially thinking the same, but was saved by the fact that DL is in love with the 717s and, with the reduction or RJ flying has some markets that can be made to work on something smaller than the 737 or A32X.

                      20,, thought, is a small number. Interestingly, AA (as a result of the merger with US) now also has 20 of the same. With DL, I wonder where we will see these planes used. At least from a passenger's perspective - the E-190 might be more comfortable than a 737, A32X or even and MD80. I certainly find it to be. So maybe long, thin routes (much the same as AC used them)?

                      What's interesting though, is how this bodes for the CSeries, as I am sure that Bombardier was hoping for a good order soon. Now, the advantage is to Embraer, and their E2 line as it might help with future fleet commonality (though, DL seems the lest concerned with that at present...). DL seems to be smartly going after every deal they can get, and using these planes (while costs are low; fuel, staffing, etc). I wonder what will happen though, when fuel starts to rise. Dump the MD-80s, or get rid of the oddballs on the fleet?
                      Whatever is necessary, is never unwise.

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