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777X Test: Behind the scenes

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  • 777X Test: Behind the scenes

    Came across this yesterday, for those interested
    AirDisaster.com Forum Member 2004-2008

    Originally posted by orangehuggy
    the most dangerous part of a flight is not the take off or landing anymore, its when a flight crew member goes to the toilet

  • #2
    Yes. Always interested when the word Boeing is in it.

    I know One Airline who expects the B777-9X in the fleet not before 2020... And I guess, that's the bird which you've mentioned:
    B777-9X
    Length (metric): 76.7
    Wingspan (metric and, "folded"): 64.8

    And here, since I am here in this forum, is a mistake. You are here in this forum longer than me, so, You are old enough to know the problem. The year when you n me joined this forum, 2008, probably was the last year when aircraft manufacturers knew all the airports which have to be big enough for let's say a B744.

    Examples? oh yes, if we need them..
    B744
    Length (metric): 70.6
    Wingspan (metric): 64.4

    Until 2008, nobody mentioned the "80x80" box! And why do I know that, well, my home airport is one of the best examples. That Means,
    the B777-9X also needs the "80x80" box, in contrast to my nickname.

    I have asked Flight Captain Randazzo, if something like the B777-9X with her folded wings are on his schedule for the year 2018. His answer, and I only heard it through the grapevine, was, "Not before the B748i".

    In short words, who needs an almost 80 m long B777, which comes to my favorite airline not before 2020, if we can fly the prototype of faster "really long long haul jets". With a good (small) wingspan, unfolded:
    B747-800i
    Lenght (metric): 76.3
    Wingspan (metric, unfolded, and almost as small as I've always loved it since 1989): 68.4
    Range: up to 8,000 nautical miles. Now take ur B777 or leave it..

    We should no longer discuss that, I'd always show you that the B744 and the B748i is faster and more economic (bigger range) than a B777-9X. I've discussed the "speed queen" topic with Gabriel, a few months ago. And even he stated that since the Lockheed TriStar has vanished from intercontinental airports like EDDL (M .95), there is only One Queen of the Skies.

    So, What do you use if you need a really fast jet in the year 2018?

    LH-B744, or her younger sister, LH-B748i !
    That's what airlines are good for, amongst others,
    The Gold Member in the 747 club, 50 years since the first LH 747.
    And constantly advanced, 744 and 748 /w upper and lower EICAS.
    Aviation enthusiast, since more than 35 years with home airport EDDL.

    Comment


    • #3
      One example where the fast B744 was replaced by .. let's be honest, the slower B777? I don't like to say that the B777 is slow. But what do you use if you like to transport 380 passengers between Germany and Gabriels favorite airport (Ezeiza?).

      We certainly do not wait for the B777-9X. Today it is the B748i, of course. Faster than a B777 ever will be. Evidence?

      UA flight #895 until one or two years ago was operated by the famous UA-B744. From O'Hare to Chek Lap Kok, the Queen of the Skies needs not much more than 15 hours. A few months later, UA no longer owned one 747 jet. Which in my eyes still is incredible. The nation which invented the Queen of the Skies, does no longer provide one Flagcarrier (intercontinental airlines who are older than me) who owns the 747. Incredible, but a fact.

      So, what did they do? They replaced the UA-B744 by the UA-B773ER. And what can I say.

      UA flight #895 to Hong Kong now takes 1 hour more, almost 17 hours nonstop. There is only One Speed Queen of the Skies... !

      PS: There must be a reason why he said these words, President B. Obama, when he was asked "What will you really miss when you by law are no longer allowed to be President?" His answer was short but precise: "My 747."
      There is only One prototype since 1969, only One fast flyin living room for one of the best politicians which I know until today. I really miss you much, B.O.!
      That's what airlines are good for, amongst others,
      The Gold Member in the 747 club, 50 years since the first LH 747.
      And constantly advanced, 744 and 748 /w upper and lower EICAS.
      Aviation enthusiast, since more than 35 years with home airport EDDL.

      Comment


      • #4
        ...And, as I once did one or two years ago, when the world was a better place,
        (..who, in August 2016, was able to think of a Trade War between Boeing, or better, between the person who now rules the country where the Boeing Headquarter is, and
        One of the most loyal Boeing customers, which is my favorite airline, member of the 747 club since 1970,

        ..some presidents seem to not really know the source of the family name Boeing, originally B÷ing... ...!)

        [admittedly, a quite large thought inbetween, but for large topics..]

        so, as I did one or two years ago when the world was a better place, I like to say Happy Birthday,

        my Big (concerning your worldwide range) Tall (concerning body height) Hawaiian! Year '61? When we've reached a certain age, we don't get older, we only gain more experience.
        That's what airlines are good for, amongst others,
        The Gold Member in the 747 club, 50 years since the first LH 747.
        And constantly advanced, 744 and 748 /w upper and lower EICAS.
        Aviation enthusiast, since more than 35 years with home airport EDDL.

        Comment


        • #5
          Back on topic.. I'll never in my life forget the last occasion when Joseph F. Sutter (1921-2016) was filmed to appear on German Television, the Boeing Chief Engineer who invented the type 747.

          Must've been the year 2011, so Sutter has just become 90 years old (!). During that broadcast, Sutter commented a scene, where a rope was taken to demonstrate how wide all 747 passenger cabins are since 1965: 6.1 meters. That must've been quite a rope.

          Today, I'd give all of my shirts plus alot of my shoes if I were able to ask Sutter this one question. "Chief Engineer Sutter, what do you think, which one of your children has the best future?"
          I'm not sure if he said "the 747". That somehow seems like an insult for his 2 daugthers and 1 son..

          But until today I don't know a second jet with these dimensions: two aisles in a 3-4-3 configuration, so 10 seats in a row, in a 6.1 m wide cabin, almost 50 years old and still in the air with growing enthusiasm.

          That's too big. Even for a B777!

          So my last words in the interview would be, "Thanks Mr Chief Engineer, for the 747, and for your time." I'll take care of her.
          That's what airlines are good for, amongst others,
          The Gold Member in the 747 club, 50 years since the first LH 747.
          And constantly advanced, 744 and 748 /w upper and lower EICAS.
          Aviation enthusiast, since more than 35 years with home airport EDDL.

          Comment

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