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Kazakhstan plane crash: Bek Air flight with 100 onboard goes down at Almaty airport

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  • #16
    Originally posted by ATLcrew View Post

    Most of them are pepsi cans by now.
    And why can't a pepsi can be airworthy? (not-genuine question).

    Amazing, there a couple hundred still flying just a couple of years ago. With so many third-world airlines in need of cheap airplanes, I thought that they would go to crash out there rather than being intentionally scrapped.

    --- Judge what is said by the merits of what is said, not by the credentials of who said it. ---
    --- Defend what you say with arguments, not by imposing your credentials ---

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Gabriel View Post

      And why can't a pepsi can be airworthy? (not-genuine question).

      Amazing, there a couple hundred still flying just a couple of years ago. With so many third-world airlines in need of cheap airplanes, I thought that they would go to crash out there rather than being intentionally scrapped.
      Of the 283 built. 113 are reportedly still in service, thus about 40% of them are still in service. That might explain why the spares that can be salvaged from the other 60% are more valuable than the prices those otherwise refurbished airframes would command in the third-world airliner market. The downturns of 2002 and 2008 took a big hit on them. American retired all 74 of theirs in 2002, citing operating costs. They have found new homes with small airlines that place efficiency below acquisition costs. The F-100 was designed to operate into the 2030's, but, like the 737, they are incompatible with the newest engine technology needed to compete for major airlines.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Evan View Post

        Of the 283 built. 113 are reportedly still in service, thus about 40% of them are still in service.
        Hmm.... "As of July 2017, 113 aircraft were still in operational use with airlines.: (c) Wikipedia.

        Also (c) Wikipedia, for is smaller sibling, the F70 "As of January 2020, 31 aircraft remain in service with 7 airlines and 2 governments" (out of 47 originally built).

        And both are derivatives of the F-28 of which 241 were built (with some still in service) and which whome the F100 and F70m must share a good bunch of spares.

        --- Judge what is said by the merits of what is said, not by the credentials of who said it. ---
        --- Defend what you say with arguments, not by imposing your credentials ---

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Gabriel View Post
          Hmm.... "As of July 2017, 113 aircraft were still in operational use with airlines.: (c) Wikipedia.

          Also (c) Wikipedia, for is smaller sibling, the F70 "As of January 2020, 31 aircraft remain in service with 7 airlines and 2 governments" (out of 47 originally built).

          And both are derivatives of the F-28 of which 241 were built (with some still in service) and which whome the F100 and F70m must share a good bunch of spares.
          And since the Fokker 100 has been out of production for almost 23 years, most spares are probably coming from salvage and rebuilders.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Evan View Post

            And since the Fokker 100 has been out of production for almost 23 years, most spares are probably coming from salvage and rebuilders.
            It's even worse than that. Often parts (more specifically part numbers) are operator-specific, so, just as an example, a GCU from an ex-American bird might not be legally OK to be fitted to another operator's airplane until it's been ascertained that the parts are, in fact, the same, which, as is the case with many things aviation, is not always as simple as it sounds. It's all about the paperwork.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by ATLcrew View Post
              It's even worse than that. Often parts (more specifically part numbers) are operator-specific, so, just as an example, a GCU from an ex-American bird might not be legally OK to be fitted to another operator's airplane until it's been ascertained that the parts are, in fact, the same, which, as is the case with many things aviation, is not always as simple as it sounds. It's all about the paperwork.
              Or... they remove the ID plates from the parts, call them "good" and chuck 'em on the airplane...
              Be alert! America needs more lerts.

              Eric Law

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