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FAO BoeingBobby: TOPMS, but the other way around

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  • FAO BoeingBobby: TOPMS, but the other way around

    Actually, this looks as something much more complicated to implement than TOPMS and, while landing overruns are more frequent than wrong take-off performance accidents, the later are much more scary and deadly.

    And, the Flying article is not even about this new system but about the plane that just certified, which oh by the way features this system.

    https://www.flyingmag.com/story/airc...m_medium=email

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    --- Judge what is said by the merits of what is said, not by the credentials of who said it. ---
    --- Defend what you say with arguments, not by imposing your credentials ---

  • #2
    Aircraft in the overrun: "Told you so. Told you so."

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Evan View Post
      Aircraft in the overrun: "Told you so. Told you so."
      LOL.

      Since the beginning of March 2020 I seem to become old.. Or why do I more n more wonder what a German man who is born 1972 does talk about with his girl friend,
      who is born in the year 2000 (?!) ..
      Even Dieter Bohlen waited until she was at least 22..

      A girl friend who is 28 years younger than you? Gabe? Say something! LOL.

      Back on topic. I really seem to become old. Or does somebody else remember an aircraft type like the Boeing 747-400 ER (which stands for 747-400 Extended Range)? Not only one of the most beautiful four engined jets which I know, but in my eyes THE most beautiful jet of all times, #1 above the LTU Lockheed Tristar and... on #3, the KLM MD-11 passage jet. Here is my #1:

      https://www.jetphotos.com/photo/9593614

      This seems to be a Boeing topic, so .. to be honest, I do not expect that Randazzo's QF-B744ER 'Wunala Dreaming' simulator tomorrow starts to talk to me. As I said, I begin to rather be old, I love aircraft with a cockpit where the pilots do talk, and the computer stays silent!
      Which even in a B744 is not always true.
      '50... 40... 30... 20... .. . 10'

      But these are words which I expect her to say.
      Last edited by LH-B744; 2020-04-02, 03:25. Reason: 'She was 19, and he was 31.' Ok, if her dad says yes. But 19 and 42? That's his daughter, believe me! Back on topic..
      That's what airlines are good for, amongst others,
      The Gold Member in the 747 club, 50 years since the first LH 747.
      And constantly advanced, 744 and 748 /w upper and lower EICAS.
      Aviation enthusiast, since more than 35 years with home airport EDDL.

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      • #4
        As usual, jibber jabber! KILOGRAMS

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        • #5
          Well yes, I flew the -100 and -200 freighters and they were a great airplane that we flew at max weights nearly all the time. But! The DC-8-73 with the CFM engines will still be my favorite. Many things about it and the way you had to fly it made it a challenge for an old stick/rudder pilot like me.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by BoeingBobby View Post
            KILOGRAMS
            And common sense on how and why braking systems are the way they are

            Les règles de l'aviation de base découragent de longues périodes de dur tirer vers le haut.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by LH-B744 View Post
              Which even in a B744 is not always true.
              '50... 40... 30... 20... .. . 10'

              But these are words which I expect her to say.
              Can she say "goodbye"?

              The latest legend to be killed off by the coronavirus:

              https://www.gatechecked.com/klm-and-...f-service-2903

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              • #8
                Totally off-topic, but.... I am not liking the way that airlines are cutting capacity. Before the COVID crisis the planes were flying almost always almost full, and it was hard to get seats if you didn't book weeks (sometimes months) in advance. The market is now destroyed but it WILL recover. It happened in 2008, in 2001 and always. In the medium to long term, you are going to look at the growth curve before COVID 19 and after COVID 19 and you will not be able to tell that there was a COVID 19 crisis. It will be just a 1-year dent in an otherwise undisturbed curve.

                That is, if the airlines have the capacity to sustain the demand. And reducing capacity in a way that it is difficult to impossible to turn it back on when the crisis is over, goes against that. And then, what will happen is that they will control the demand with price.

                --- Judge what is said by the merits of what is said, not by the credentials of who said it. ---
                --- Defend what you say with arguments, not by imposing your credentials ---

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Gabriel View Post
                  Totally off-topic, but.... I am not liking the way that airlines are cutting capacity. Before the COVID crisis the planes were flying almost always almost full, and it was hard to get seats if you didn't book weeks (sometimes months) in advance. The market is now destroyed but it WILL recover. It happened in 2008, in 2001 and always. In the medium to long term, you are going to look at the growth curve before COVID 19 and after COVID 19 and you will not be able to tell that there was a COVID 19 crisis. It will be just a 1-year dent in an otherwise undisturbed curve.

                  That is, if the airlines have the capacity to sustain the demand. And reducing capacity in a way that it is difficult to impossible to turn it back on when the crisis is over, goes against that. And then, what will happen is that they will control the demand with price.
                  Or we learn from this debarcle and bring back regulation...

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Gabriel View Post
                    Totally off-topic, but.... I am not liking the way that airlines are cutting capacity. Before the COVID crisis the planes were flying almost always almost full, and it was hard to get seats if you didn't book weeks (sometimes months) in advance. The market is now destroyed but it WILL recover. It happened in 2008, in 2001 and always. In the medium to long term, you are going to look at the growth curve before COVID 19 and after COVID 19 and you will not be able to tell that there was a COVID 19 crisis. It will be just a 1-year dent in an otherwise undisturbed curve.

                    That is, if the airlines have the capacity to sustain the demand. And reducing capacity in a way that it is difficult to impossible to turn it back on when the crisis is over, goes against that. And then, what will happen is that they will control the demand with price.
                    One year can be an awfully big dent. Especially when it's already claimed several (albeit small, at least so far) players.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by ATLcrew View Post

                      One year can be an awfully big dent. Especially when it's already claimed several (albeit small, at least so far) players.
                      I don't dispute that. If all the airlines follow the same hard capacity cut strategy getting rid of planes, it will be reasonable ok for all surviving airlines. They will compensate part of the revenue lost in quantity by revenue gain in price. Now if some airlines can keep more capacity "in reserve", they will gain market share when the crisis is over. Because the demand will not be less after the crisis than it was before, so if the capacity of the industry at great is reduced, the airlines that have cut capacity proportionally less than others (and survived the crisis) will simply fill proportionally more seats.

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                      --- Judge what is said by the merits of what is said, not by the credentials of who said it. ---
                      --- Defend what you say with arguments, not by imposing your credentials ---

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                      • #12
                        How an airline manages their fleet when they restart will determine if they succeed for fail financially. They will try to always run near capacity.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Gabriel View Post

                          I don't dispute that. If all the airlines follow the same hard capacity cut strategy getting rid of planes, it will be reasonable ok for all surviving airlines. They will compensate part of the revenue lost in quantity by revenue gain in price. Now if some airlines can keep more capacity "in reserve", they will gain market share when the crisis is over. Because the demand will not be less after the crisis than it was before, so if the capacity of the industry at great is reduced, the airlines that have cut capacity proportionally less than others (and survived the crisis) will simply fill proportionally more seats.

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                          In the US at least, the airlines will be heavily subsidized by a taxpayer-funded bailout. In return, we expect them to maintain capacity so that pricing remains affordable and service remains available when the crisis passes. We are paying them to maintain capacity.

                          However, in the US at least, industry has a heavy hand in drafting legislation, so it will come as no surprise to learn that the bailouts contain no such stipulation to maintain capacity. It will also come as no surprise if the airlines both take the money and cut capacity resulting in higher short-term profits and much higher fares.

                          When this is over, we should see a surge in demand and a surge in the travel industry. The industry should be prepared for this.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Evan View Post

                            In the US at least, the airlines will be heavily subsidied by a taxpayer-funded bailout. In return, we expect them to maintain capacity so that pricing remains affordable and service remains available when the crisis passes. We are paying them to maintain capacity.

                            However, in the US at least, industry has a heavy hand in drafting legislation, so it will come as no surprise to learn that the bailouts contain no such stipulation to maintain capacity. It will also come as no surprise if the airlines both take the money and cut capacity resulting in higher short-term profits and much higher fares.

                            When this is over, we should see a surge in demand and a surge in the travel industry. The industry should be prepared for this.
                            Yes, sure.

                            https://simpleflying.com/united-757-...ly-retirement/

                            --- Judge what is said by the merits of what is said, not by the credentials of who said it. ---
                            --- Defend what you say with arguments, not by imposing your credentials ---

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Gabriel View Post
                              Oh no, not the blessed 767's! The last of the dignified airliners. Isn't there a way to re-engine these? Slap on a pair of Trent 1000's? FBW the wing spoilers?

                              Well, I guess there will be a surplus of cheap Boeings coming to market. Never been a better time to start Sweet Monkey Airlines.

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