Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

MD-80 / DC-9 Stall Exercise

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Gabriel
    replied
    It is not backwards, it is attacking forward and flapping with the wind.

    Leave a comment:


  • Evan
    replied
    Originally posted by 3WE View Post
    Improper cropping: horizontal stabilizer and wing truncated.

    Also, taxiway sign behind the engine is distracting clutter.
    American flag is backwards. Distress signal?

    Leave a comment:


  • 3WE
    replied
    Improper cropping: horizontal stabilizer and wing truncated.

    Also, taxiway sign behind the engine is distracting clutter.

    Leave a comment:


  • Gabriel
    replied
    Eyebrow window

    Click image for larger version

Name:	APFN945ATtaxiSLC.jpg
Views:	25
Size:	409.0 KB
ID:	1094467​​​​​​​

    Leave a comment:


  • LH-B744
    replied
    This is why I always love the Original source. Now, if I had a youtube account, I could ask the person who uploaded that video back then in October 2015. Or I could read all those 1376 video comments, to find out where that little window in the upper right corner comes from. But that isn't really my plan.

    The maneuver in the video is interesting: First of all, a 20 degree bank angle right corner, and then the PF pushes the yoke almost out of the cockpit, so that over portside his jet begins a nosedive, upside down.

    I like to second what Gabriel said. That definitely is not a stall exercise.

    That maneuver somehow reminds me of the fatal HB-HOT crash (August 2018_), which according to eyewitnesses was precisely,
    a nosedive over portside, all three propellers ahead, with a 90 degree vertical impact into the rock.

    Really interesting. That video was first published (?) in 2015. So, that video somehow shows how to escape a nosedive over portside. But obviously nobody knew that video in August 2018, me included.
    And one thing is different. That video shows a nosedive over the ocean. And definitely not above high Alpine scenery, like above a mountain with elev 10,200 AMSL (3098 meter über Meer).

    In high alpine scenery, you don't have that much vertical space for such a nosedive with a happy end.

    After all, a good and interesting video.

    Leave a comment:


  • LH-B744
    replied
    Hm. Our beloved forum server here again seems to show one or two technical problems.. Gabe, what do you do if your computer does not do what you want to do?
    Kick that thing in the a**, right?

    Back on topic.

    Wasn't it possible for that Junior threadstarter to give us the original youtube link. But I'll forgive him. He still seems so shiny new, after all those years..

    Online since 2015, but I've seen that video for the first time today. This is the original source:
    https://youtu.be/L2CsO-Vu7oc

    I have one question, 'it’s real life and not in the sim', somebody said. I could second what he says, but what is that small window in the upper right corner, at 00:35.

    Where does that come from?

    PS: Fsx is able to produce such a window. But the cockpit seems like what I know from jetphotos, from a real B744 cockpit. That cockpit seems to be real.
    Last edited by LH-B744; 2020-07-13, 23:57. Reason: + the Original source.

    Leave a comment:


  • LH-B744
    replied
    Test.

    Leave a comment:


  • Evan
    replied
    Originally posted by Gabriel View Post

    Can you please post the relevant PPRuNe link?
    Meanwhile, there is also this:

    https://www.pprune.org/jet-blast/623...7-not-sim.html

    Leave a comment:


  • Evan
    replied
    Originally posted by Gabriel View Post

    Can you please post the relevant PPRuNe link?
    That took some digging and now I've lost it. Do you have a shovel?

    Leave a comment:


  • Gabriel
    replied
    Originally posted by Evan View Post

    According to Pprune this was a steady state sideslip certification test. This was the first one done without the attitude recovery chute tailcone and the stall characteristics were quite different.
    Can you please post the relevant PPRuNe link?

    Leave a comment:


  • Gabriel
    replied
    Originally posted by Evan View Post

    Wouldn't you need to pull rather than push when inverted to get the nose down?
    "Push down" is an expression that means just "push". The "down" part is relative to the pilot's / airplane's frame of reference, not the Earth's.

    You don't want to get the nose down when you are in a nose-down unusual attitude. YOu want to minimize altitude loss and having the airplane pointed towards the Earth is counterproductive.

    Leave a comment:


  • Evan
    replied
    Originally posted by Gabriel View Post

    According to standardized upset recovery procedure (which I don't know if they had already been developed back then) they should have first pushed down to less than zero G (which would have also immediately recovered the stall)...
    Wouldn't you need to pull rather than push when inverted to get the nose down?

    Leave a comment:


  • Evan
    replied
    Originally posted by kent olsen View Post
    Curious how he has almost full right aileron with what appears to be both throttles up maybe half way. Possibly the instructor is holding full rudder or one engine was shutdown.
    According to Pprune this was a steady state sideslip certification test. This was the first one done without the attitude recovery chute tailcone and the stall characteristics were quite different.

    Leave a comment:


  • 3WE
    replied
    Originally posted by kent olsen View Post
    Curious how he has almost full right aileron with what appears to be both throttles up maybe half way.
    Why would we do something like that?

    Leave a comment:


  • Gabriel
    replied
    Originally posted by kent olsen View Post
    I flew the DC-9 and it does look like they are in a real airplane, sun in the windscreen. Curious how he has almost full right aileron with what appears to be both throttles up maybe half way. Possibly the instructor is holding full rudder or one engine was shutdown. Left seat pilot was new to this as after the nose drops he's slow to reduce the power and deploy the speed brakes. You can see his body react as the the aircraft rolls left and the nose drops.
    Apparently, this was not a rookie with an instructor, they were 2 very experienced test pilots and this was a development or certification test flight.
    Also apparently, they were testing slow flight or stalls in turns, and the plane stalled. That is why, some say in the comments, they don't recover immediately, they need to reduce AoA first and get some airspeed before they can pull Gs from the wings.

    I was still surprised by the recovery. In the beginning the plane rolled inverted but the nose did not go down so much. According to standardized upset recovery procedure (which I don't know if they had already been developed back then) they should have first pushed down to less than zero G (which would have also immediately recovered the stall), rolled with ailerons towards the roll index, used same-direction rudder (which would have been "up" rudder) to minimize how much the nose goes down, and as the bank goes into not-inverted reverse the push with a pull (only now minding about not to stall, don't pull past stickshaker AoA). It looks to me that the recovery could have been done much quicker, with much less altitude loss and possibly no overspeed.

    Some in the comment say that, per test flight standards, they needed to wait 3 seconds before starting the recovery for "human reaction time allowance". I have my doubts.

    I would love to learn the whole and true story of this.

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X