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  • #16
    Originally posted by Gabriel View Post
    I remember a video of I think it was an A340 bouncing and rocking several times (it was more a "roll bouncing" than a vertical bouncing) although in that case I think there was no engine strike. Will try to find the video.
    Found it. #9 in this video (which actually the 2nd one in the countdown from 10). It was not an A340.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kzbxN_TVQ6E

    --- Judge what is said by the merits of what is said, not by the credentials of who said it. ---
    --- Defend what you say with arguments, not by imposing your credentials ---

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    • #17
      I don’t know how you can strike 3 engines, but here is how you can ALMOST strike 3 engines:

      https://youtu.be/OtnL4KYVtDE

      No major message in the video other than 747 pilots don’t have much safety buffer to land other than level.

      Arguably this landing is pretty good- in spite of what it looks like.

      Gabes question- would you have to break something on the gear to scrape an inner engine? Yeah, maybe, but who knows...maybe not.
      Les règles de l'aviation de base découragent de longues périodes de dur tirer vers le haut.

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      • #18
        This is a depiction of 7deg roll with GE/PW engines. The red line is raised bit to accomodate max gear compression (or body gear only). This doesn't take wing flex into consideration.

        Without wing flex, it seems that the inboard engines are practically at the same clearance as the outboard. At least it shows that an inboard engine strike is possible at around 7deg roll.​​

        Click image for larger version

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        • #19
          Originally posted by 3WE View Post
          I don’t know how you can strike 3 engines, but here is how you can ALMOST strike 3 engines:

          https://youtu.be/OtnL4KYVtDE

          No major message in the video other than 747 pilots don’t have much safety buffer to land other than level.

          Arguably this landing is pretty good- in spite of what it looks like.
          For sure it was much better than this one in similar circumstances:

          https://youtu.be/3PCOcyt7BPI?t=32

          First landing in this video shows the effect of applying the Cessna 172 technique of "full aileron into the wind" in a 747.
          (By the way, the video contains pilots mastering many crosswind landings in big airplane, most of them 747)

          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JwgDl02z5Mc

          And this is how an actual engine strikes looks like in a 747 (but only one engine affected)

          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oRScivHIH10

          --- Judge what is said by the merits of what is said, not by the credentials of who said it. ---
          --- Defend what you say with arguments, not by imposing your credentials ---

          Comment


          • #20
            Originally posted by Gabriel View Post
            For sure it was much better than this one in similar circumstances:

            https://youtu.be/3PCOcyt7BPI?t=32

            First landing in this video shows the effect of applying the Cessna 172 technique of "full aileron into the wind" in a 747.
            (By the way, the video contains pilots mastering many crosswind landings in big airplane, most of them 747)

            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JwgDl02z5Mc

            And this is how an actual engine strikes looks like in a 747 (but only one engine affected)

            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oRScivHIH10
            Also an Atlas/Polar bird. A brand new -8 besides.

            Comment


            • #21
              Originally posted by Evan View Post
              This is a depiction of 7deg roll with GE/PW engines. The red line is raised bit to accomodate max gear compression (or body gear only). This doesn't take wing flex into consideration.

              Without wing flex, it seems that the inboard engines are practically at the same clearance as the outboard. At least it shows that an inboard engine strike is possible at around 7deg roll.​​

              Click image for larger version

Name:	747-7DEGROLL.jpg
Views:	117
Size:	58.4 KB
ID:	1096711
              I did a weather diversion into Santarém, Brazil after a missed approach into Manaus in a 200 many years ago. Kind of a short runway so I didn't want to land long, and it was raining as well. Dropped the oxygen masks in the back, load master accused me of knocking a filling of his out, and I compressed one body gear strut enough to make the seal leak. No pod strikes however. Lucky for me the flight mechanic was able to fix the leak.

              Why this became bold font I have know idea.



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              • #22
                Originally posted by BoeingBobby View Post

                I did a weather diversion into Santarém, Brazil after a missed approach into Manaus in a 200 many years ago. Kind of a short runway so I didn't want to land long, and it was raining as well. Dropped the oxygen masks in the back, load master accused me of knocking a filling of his out, and I compressed one body gear strut enough to make the seal leak. No pod strikes however. Lucky for me the flight mechanic was able to fix the leak.

                Why this became bold font I have know idea.


                Well I think we can rest assured that Boeing designed the thing to let you plant it at maximum oleo compression without a pod strike. The bank angle is wot done it. I just assumed the widely placed mains and the outboard engine would prevent an inboard strike. Not the case, obviously.

                Curious. What do you think is the maximum bank you've ever experienced on a runway?

                Why this became bold font I have know idea.

                What's it doing now?

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                • #23
                  http://www.avweb.com/aviation-news/a...gusty-landing/

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Evan View Post

                    Well I think we can rest assured that Boeing designed the thing to let you plant it at maximum oleo compression without a pod strike. The bank angle is wot done it. I just assumed the widely placed mains and the outboard engine would prevent an inboard strike. Not the case, obviously.

                    Curious. What do you think is the maximum bank you've ever experienced on a runway?


                    What's it doing now?
                    Outboard engines are the ones that usually get it because of bank angle. I am surprised that Gabe didn't post the famous one at Kai Tak. I will have to see if I can find it. Maybe 3 degrees

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                    • #25
                      This is the one I was talking about.
                      Attached Files

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by BoeingBobby View Post
                        This is the one I was talking about.
                        I think everyone knows that one. Spectacular image. But the aircraft is rotated there and I doubt there is much gear compression either.

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by BoeingBobby View Post

                          Also an Atlas/Polar bird. A brand new -8 besides.
                          Takes some doing at LAX. I don't recall ever having much of a crosswind there. Or winds much above 12kts of any kind, for that matter.

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                          • #28
                            Many years ago when I was flying into Hong Kong's Kia Tak airport, we used to go up and sit on the hill with the checker board. That was the turn to final, steep approach onto, if I remember, a 9000 ft runway. Pretty tricky and many times I saw approaches that where high and a little long where the pilot slammed it onto the runway so they could get stopped. Boy you could really see the wing flex. Of course we where looking down on the top of the aircraft but you could still see the wing flex.

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                            • #29
                              Beef up the rudder & tail fin, unhook
                              yaw damper and re-wire to ailerons. All maneuvers done with wings automatically leveled. Steering done by rudder- install central vertical surface to assist turning.

                              Also consider a nose lowering system based on low airspeed.

                              Or ban all crosswind landings...
                              Les règles de l'aviation de base découragent de longues périodes de dur tirer vers le haut.

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Originally posted by 3WE View Post
                                Beef up the rudder & tail fin, unhook
                                yaw damper and re-wire to ailerons. All maneuvers done with wings automatically leveled. Steering done by rudder- install central vertical surface to assist turning.

                                Also consider a nose lowering system based on low airspeed.

                                Or ban all crosswind landings...
                                What the hell have you been smoking?

                                Comment

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