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  • kent olsen
    replied
    Long time ago. Friend of mine traded his Cherokee for a Cessna 180 and asked me to train him. Needed so many hours for his insurance. Very sharp fellow, picked up the tail wheel stuff quick. Before I'd sign him off wanted to do some crosswind landings. So one day we went over to Oak Harbor Washington. About a 3000ft strip that rose about 50 the last 1000 or so feet. East/West strip typical 50ft wide, wind out of the south 15+. Now there is a hanger right next to the runway on the approach to runway 27. Soo I told him plan to touchdown just past the hanger because the building will block the wind and with the hill before the end of the runway shouldn't be a problem stopping. Well no! he's flaring on the end of the runway next to the hanger. I let him continue as it's all grass off the runway. Sure as the dickens. As he's about to touchdown we come out from behind the hanger and the wind hits us and we are off the runway in the grass. I'm just about to say I told you so when I see a ditch in front of us. I grabbed the wheel and yanked back and luckily we were able to jump over it. The guy on the unicom calls us to see if we are ok, I said yes, he says what about the ditch? Luckily I said we were able to jump it. Lessons learnt

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  • Evan
    replied
    Originally posted by Gabriel View Post
    ultralight fight club
    Now this is getting interesting.

    Leave a comment:


  • Gabriel
    replied
    Most of my 200+ take-off and landings for the private pilot license were done in a 2300 ft dirt runway (in the Tomahawk), and they were all full stop (the school had a no touch-and-go policy, they said that it stressed the engine).

    My flight school was based in a nice controlled airport with a 3300 ft asphalt runway, but due to the heavy traffic, when practicing take-off and landing we wold normally go to this other ultralight fight club.

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  • 3WE
    replied
    Originally posted by BoeingBobby View Post
    grass strip is 3000' and is East/West.
    Fortunately, half of my private training was on a 2500 ft,, 50-ft wide NS blacktop runway...Yeah, it was a 172 and rarely was it a direct crosswind, but rarely was it straight down the runway...Windy days were a blast..

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  • Gabriel
    replied
    Originally posted by BoeingBobby View Post

    One of my favorite things to do in the winter here in Miami is when the cold fronts come through. I have a 46 J-3 Cub with a 65 HP 4 cylinder engine and no electrical system. Our grass strip is 3000' and is East/West. Wind out of the North 15 - 20. Sometimes with gusts to 30. Touch and go's from both directions from a teardrop. I can usually get around 20 done in 1 hour. F*****g blast!
    Are you sure you are complying with the maximum demonstrated crosswind declared in the POH as well as company procedures and policies, respecting the stabilized approach criteria and, above all, not violating 14 CFR 91.13?

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  • BoeingBobby
    replied
    Originally posted by 3WE View Post

    Just trying to fix everything wrong in aviation for Evan...it’s a tough job and will drive one to drinking. Especially tough since I think crosswind landings are cool.
    One of my favorite things to do in the winter here in Miami is when the cold fronts come through. I have a 46 J-3 Cub with a 65 HP 4 cylinder engine and no electrical system. Our grass strip is 3000' and is East/West. Wind out of the North 15 - 20. Sometimes with gusts to 30. Touch and go's from both directions from a teardrop. I can usually get around 20 done in 1 hour. F*****g blast!

    Leave a comment:


  • 3WE
    replied
    Originally posted by BoeingBobby View Post

    What the hell have you been smoking?
    Just trying to fix everything wrong in aviation for Evan...it’s a tough job and will drive one to drinking. Especially tough since I think crosswind landings are cool.

    Leave a comment:


  • TeeVee
    replied
    Originally posted by BoeingBobby View Post

    What the hell have you been smoking?
    jealous? there's a dispensary near me if ya want i'll pick some up for ya

    Leave a comment:


  • BoeingBobby
    replied
    Originally posted by 3WE View Post
    Beef up the rudder & tail fin, unhook
    yaw damper and re-wire to ailerons. All maneuvers done with wings automatically leveled. Steering done by rudder- install central vertical surface to assist turning.

    Also consider a nose lowering system based on low airspeed.

    Or ban all crosswind landings...
    What the hell have you been smoking?

    Leave a comment:


  • 3WE
    replied
    Beef up the rudder & tail fin, unhook
    yaw damper and re-wire to ailerons. All maneuvers done with wings automatically leveled. Steering done by rudder- install central vertical surface to assist turning.

    Also consider a nose lowering system based on low airspeed.

    Or ban all crosswind landings...

    Leave a comment:


  • kent olsen
    replied
    Many years ago when I was flying into Hong Kong's Kia Tak airport, we used to go up and sit on the hill with the checker board. That was the turn to final, steep approach onto, if I remember, a 9000 ft runway. Pretty tricky and many times I saw approaches that where high and a little long where the pilot slammed it onto the runway so they could get stopped. Boy you could really see the wing flex. Of course we where looking down on the top of the aircraft but you could still see the wing flex.

    Leave a comment:


  • ATLcrew
    replied
    Originally posted by BoeingBobby View Post

    Also an Atlas/Polar bird. A brand new -8 besides.
    Takes some doing at LAX. I don't recall ever having much of a crosswind there. Or winds much above 12kts of any kind, for that matter.

    Leave a comment:


  • Evan
    replied
    Originally posted by BoeingBobby View Post
    This is the one I was talking about.
    I think everyone knows that one. Spectacular image. But the aircraft is rotated there and I doubt there is much gear compression either.

    Leave a comment:


  • BoeingBobby
    replied
    This is the one I was talking about.
    Attached Files

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  • BoeingBobby
    replied
    Originally posted by Evan View Post

    Well I think we can rest assured that Boeing designed the thing to let you plant it at maximum oleo compression without a pod strike. The bank angle is wot done it. I just assumed the widely placed mains and the outboard engine would prevent an inboard strike. Not the case, obviously.

    Curious. What do you think is the maximum bank you've ever experienced on a runway?


    What's it doing now?
    Outboard engines are the ones that usually get it because of bank angle. I am surprised that Gabe didn't post the famous one at Kai Tak. I will have to see if I can find it. Maybe 3 degrees

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