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  • #91
    Originally posted by BoeingBobby View Post

    The radar altimeter on my Cub is inop!
    This has nothing to do with the MAX, but I've been curious on why some former airline pilots end up buying something like a Cub (or a 120 or a something similar). Can you explain the appeal to me? What's the point of an airplane that has no speed, range, or ceiling? I honestly don't get the draw, especially after flying jets.

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    • #92
      Originally posted by ATLcrew View Post

      This has nothing to do with the MAX, but I've been curious on why some former airline pilots end up buying something like a Cub (or a 120 or a something similar). Can you explain the appeal to me? What's the point of an airplane that has no speed, range, or ceiling? I honestly don't get the draw, especially after flying jets.
      The Cub has been in my family for over 30 years. Ever fly a Cub or a Stearman? I usually fly twice a week for an hour or so. Real flying.

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      • #93
        Regarding these flight tests where Boeing "coached" test pilots and whether or not (or how much) the corporate culture changed at Boeing (and at the FAA)...

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WQIL8CzL-yY

        --- Judge what is said by the merits of what is said, not by the credentials of who said it. ---
        --- Defend what you say with arguments, not by imposing your credentials ---

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        • #94
          Many of us older guys learned to fly in tail draggers. The challenge to coordinate turns and land 3 point is still there.

          Ok I'll surely get some backlash from this. When I was doing IOE in the 747 this is how I taught my students to land in a crosswind. You are trying to land in the middle of a 150/200 ft wide runway. Stay lined up with the extended centerline. Now if you need to move to the left 10-20 feet and you put in a small bank when you roll out of the small bank 600,000lbs of inertia will cause the airplane to move another 10 or so feet before it goes straight. So this is how I taught it. Line up with the centerline. Crab into the wind as necessary. Keep your wings level. If you drift off the center line a little use your rudders and skid back into the wind and continue the crab as necessary. The airplane doesn't like the skid so when you return the rudders to neutral it will immediately go where it's pointing. Use those little skids to maintain the crab into the crosswind. Now when you flare you are used to pointing the nose where you want it and a little wing down into the wind and some rudder to straighten things out and you are down.

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          • #95
            Originally posted by BoeingBobby View Post

            The Cub has been in my family for over 30 years. Ever fly a Cub or a Stearman? I usually fly twice a week for an hour or so. Real flying.
            I flew a PA-11 for my taildragger signoff. Can't say I had much desire to do it again, and certainly not to own one.

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            • #96
              Originally posted by ATLcrew View Post

              I flew a PA-11 for my taildragger signoff. Can't say I had much desire to do it again, and certainly not to own one.
              What can I tell you? Some people love to fly, and some just do it for a living. Only thing that is better than flying a Cub or a Stearman, is a sailplane in my book.

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              • #97
                Originally posted by BoeingBobby View Post

                What can I tell you? Some people love to fly, and some just do it for a living. Only thing that is better than flying a Cub or a Stearman, is a sailplane in my book.
                What can I tell you? Some people love to fly and some just go around the pattern thirty-seven times in a row at 80mph...

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                • #98
                  Originally posted by ATLcrew View Post

                  What can I tell you? Some people love to fly and some just go around the pattern thirty-seven times in a row at 80mph...
                  80? That's pushing it!

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                  • #99
                    Quote = The media: "Boeing 737 Max takes to the skies again in crucial passenger confidence test following fatal crashes"
                    Les règles de l'aviation de base découragent de longues périodes de dur tirer vers le haut.

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                    • Originally posted by 3WE View Post
                      Quote = The media: "Boeing 737 Max takes to the skies again in crucial passenger confidence test following fatal crashes"
                      One diversion for a bad hydraulic pressure indication and fuel imbalance, maybe a FQIS sensor issue already made the headlines as "737MAX DIVERTS DUE TO ENGINE FAILURE".

                      It's going to be merciless for a while.

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                      • Originally posted by ATLcrew View Post

                        What can I tell you? Some people love to fly and some just go around the pattern thirty-seven times in a row at 80mph...
                        That's 37 takeoffs, 37 landings, 37 level offs, 37 descents to manage, and conceivably 36 of those pesky late go-arounds that Gabriel loves so much.

                        While straight and level is certainly a high-level skill, it's boring.
                        Les règles de l'aviation de base découragent de longues périodes de dur tirer vers le haut.

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