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Why fully automated planes can never happen while ILS is still around.

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  • Why fully automated planes can never happen while ILS is still around.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c7vcyJFCkGY&t=84s

  • #2
    (Although one could argue that a fully automated plane would never lose track of distance and altitude.)

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    • #3
      What?
      Les règles de l'aviation de base découragent de longues périodes de dur tirer vers le haut.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by 3WE View Post
        What?
        ILS produces false glideslope signals that normally do not interact with avionics but can be encountered when attempting to catch the glideslope from above while being too close to the threshold. The false signals can cause the autopilot to climb rapidly. In this case, the crew were not monitoring the height/distance targets and ended up in false glideslope country, but were quick to take over and reduce the 30 deg pitch-upset, but not before alpha-floor kicked in. If there were no flight crew to correct and take over, I'm not sure things would have gone so well. ILS is an antiquated system that is prone to distortions and false signals. Any autoflight system not involving a pilot will need something much more infallible, in service, at every airport it serves.

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        • #5
          Doesn’t your great automation track where the plane SHOULD BE and would calmly help fix the problem of a false glide slope?

          I think procedures ALREADY call for cross checking height AND lateral navigation USING SYSTEMS OTHER THAN THE GS before you start ‘blindly’ following it the final ~1,500 ft.

          Shouldn’t take much code that isn’t already there…
          Les règles de l'aviation de base découragent de longues périodes de dur tirer vers le haut.

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