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WN Jet diverts to West Va due to hole in Fuselage

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  • #31
    This is going to be a weird one...

    It looks like the "damage" was cut with a skin saw, not ripped. And no I'm not talking about were they cut the piece out of the aircraft with a skin saw.

    BTW, the aircraft took off today around noon on a ferry flight to Dallas.
    -Not an Airbus or Boeing guy here.
    -20 year veteran on the USN Lockheed P-3 Orion.

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    • #32
      Originally posted by P3_Super_Bee View Post
      This is going to be a weird one...

      It looks like the "damage" was cut with a skin saw, not ripped. And no I'm not talking about were they cut the piece out of the aircraft with a skin saw.

      BTW, the aircraft took off today around noon on a ferry flight to Dallas.

      That is the wierdest little hole...

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      • #33
        Originally posted by P3_Super_Bee View Post
        This is going to be a weird one...

        It looks like the "damage" was cut with a skin saw, not ripped. And no I'm not talking about were they cut the piece out of the aircraft with a skin saw.

        BTW, the aircraft took off today around noon on a ferry flight to Dallas.
        Looking at the NTSB website I note that they do say there are two layers of metal bonded together. And the way the upper layer tore away from the river strip appears to confirm that. I wonder if the cut out region of the inner layer of metal was not deburred properly - that could cause damage to the outer layer over time plus it would explain the resultant location of the metal tear. I notice there is a pad of some description bonded to the 'flap" - could this be a vibration damper?
        Regardless because it appears all the torn away metal is available it should be easy for NTSB or Boeing metallurgists to determine if the cause was metal fatigue.

        I mentioned rip stop construction in a prior post. I have designed such structures and they work. I wonder if this was intentional design in an area of high stress (i.e. a pressure rupture would not destroy the aircraft).

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        • #34
          Originally posted by P3_Super_Bee View Post
          This is going to be a weird one...

          It looks like the "damage" was cut with a skin saw, not ripped. And no I'm not talking about were they cut the piece out of the aircraft with a skin saw.

          BTW, the aircraft took off today around noon on a ferry flight to Dallas.
          Pardon my ignorance, but do they fly the plane with the hole in the fulesalage to Dallas?

          And can you repost the link to the pictures?

          Thanks

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          • #35
            Originally posted by the_Yeti View Post
            Pardon my ignorance, but do they fly the plane with the hole in the fulesalage to Dallas?

            And can you repost the link to the pictures?

            Thanks
            Ahh No. Either a ferry patch was installed(temporary, to allow movement of aircraft to a facility to where a more suitable repair can be preformed) or it was fixed IAW SRM's and can be put back into service.

            Looking at the pictures... It kinda of looks like scribe line cuts... Maybe, there was a corrosion gripe on the outer skin at that location. It was taped off to spray only the area that was painted. Some dumb ass new guy cut the tape, and/or paper with a razor blade or scribe, it cut the metal and weaken it.

            I remember a squadron doing something similar. Squadrons in the Navy paint the squadron logo on the tail of the aircraft. VP-4 would cover the entire tail with tape, then draw the logo, then cut it out with a razor. Dumbasses cut into the metal when doing so. Caused the metal to corroded and eventually exfo developed, 1st aircraft ended up requiring 35 patches on the vertical stab to fix the corrosion problem. 6 years later they did it again, this time requiring 42 patches.
            -Not an Airbus or Boeing guy here.
            -20 year veteran on the USN Lockheed P-3 Orion.

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            • #36
              Originally posted by the_Yeti View Post
              And can you repost the link to the pictures?
              Picture are on the NTSB website
              http://www.ntsb.gov/Pressrel/2009/090716b.html

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              • #37
                Image Clues?

                Did the rupture propagated from Fwd facing edge?
                What is the vert witness "mark" on the image?
                Is this indicative of an "inclusion" in aluminium stock?

                What is the "sooty" deposit on the interior image?
                Looks like mould = possible high humidity = potential corrosion but this appears to have been excluded by the NTSB?
                Reinforcing this statement is the fact that any corrosion would likely be most prominent along the top of the lamination joint line where moisture would potentially collect.

                and JFI I wonder why does the design call for lamination in this area?

                Ripstop or area of known high loading...or some other reason?
                Why would ripstop be used just in this (and other areas) rather than everywhere?

                I therefore contend that the most likely cause is substandard material due to an inclusion in the pre-rolled stock condition. The direction of rolling likely being vertically as installed and therefore perpendicular to the primary curvature of the fuselage. i.e. the area of suspected inclusion was being "worked" longitudinally by the hoop stress resulting from pressurisation of the fuselage.

                Did somebody post the number of cycles that this aircraft has undergone?
                I assume that it is not untypical, unlike Aloha.

                ...but of course I may be wrong.

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by P3_Super_Bee View Post

                  Looking at the pictures... It kinda of looks like scribe line cuts... Maybe, there was a corrosion gripe on the outer skin at that location. It was taped off to spray only the area that was painted. Some dumb ass new guy cut the tape, and/or paper with a razor blade or scribe, it cut the metal and weaken it.
                  Hmm.... Take a look at this AIRWORTHINESS DIRECTIVE

                  Originally posted by snanceki View Post
                  What is the "sooty" deposit on the interior image?
                  Hard to tell could be one of two things, or a combo of both...

                  1. Brain Farting and can't remember the commercial name, wanna say Dynol, but in any case, a corrosion preventative spray. Hate the shit. Never really dries, and is always tacky. Everything sticks to it. They sprayed it in our wheel wells for a while. Smart move(sic). All the freaking dirt/grime from the runways/taxiways/ramps stuck to it. Total mess.

                  2. Glue. To hold insulation into place.
                  -Not an Airbus or Boeing guy here.
                  -20 year veteran on the USN Lockheed P-3 Orion.

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                  • #39
                    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2009/0..._n_270175.html

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                    • #40
                      Quote from this site:
                      The maintenance company, which was not identified by Southwest or the FAA, used hinge assemblies made by a subcontractor who is not certified to make the parts, according to the agency.

                      Can someone point me to the requirements for subcontractor certification?
                      Thanks.

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                      • #41
                        Any updates?

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                        • #42
                          Originally posted by juan23 View Post
                          Any updates?

                          http://www.flightglobal.com/articles...directive.html
                          Robin Guess Aviation Historian, Photographer, Web Designer.

                          http://www.Jet-Fighters.Net
                          http://www.Jet-Liners.Net

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