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Qantas fuel leak incident

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  • Qantas fuel leak incident

    http://www.news.com.au/travel/story/...014090,00.html

  • #2
    How many demerits does an old plane get before it gets grounded?

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    • #3
      who knows?

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      • #4
        Just a thought. Maybe on it's previous incident, some shrapnel hit the wing and was not repaired. Then it deeloped to cause a hole.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by EconomyClass View Post
          How many demerits does an old plane get before it gets grounded?
          What do you mean demerits? Properly maintained an aircraft should be a safe flying its first hour as it is flying the hour before the manufacturer and user fatigue limit is reached. It's a 747-400, the very earliest of this model Jumbo entered service in 1989, so the oldest would only be 20 years old. Considering the type of flying these aircraft do (primarily long distance, low cycles) these are not 'old' aircraft.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by ced ampo View Post
            Just a thought. Maybe on it's previous incident, some shrapnel hit the wing and was not repaired. Then it deeloped to cause a hole.
            So, for the past year, despite the repair of the initial damage at a heavy maintenance facility, subsequent routine engineering inspections, walkarounds by the crew and maintenance people, oh, and the fact that there was not an 'explosion' in the traditional sense - more an oxygen bottle punching itself out through the outer skin, nobody discovered a hole caused by shrapnel? Also at a loss to understand how the initial shrapnel was able to puncture the wing but then it took around a year to work its way in to cause a hole?

            Very unlikely. Something broke - problem found, aircraft fixed.

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            • #7
              Come on people. How on earth could an oxygen bottle have damaged a fuel pipe anywhere on the plane. The pipes run in the wings from the fuel tanks in the wings and the cargo bays. It has to be 2 separate unrelated incidents. And how can anybody blame maintenance? How could anybody predict that I fuel pipe was going to leak, or that an oxygen bottle was going to explode? Congratulations to the pilots for landing the plane safely. We have had too many crashes this year as it is. I prey there won't be any more.

              Quantas has a sterling safety record. As usual, the press is blowing things out of proportion.

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              • #8
                Fuel leaks (and hydraulic leaks) are not unusual on aircraft - usually they are discovered on the ground - even though I worked in this business I do not know how leaks are detected in flight unless the engines start smoking or the leak stains the wing or engine pylon/pod.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Highkeas View Post
                  Fuel leaks (and hydraulic leaks) are not unusual on aircraft - usually they are discovered on the ground - even though I worked in this business I do not know how leaks are detected in flight unless the engines start smoking or the leak stains the wing or engine pylon/pod.
                  It's pretty simple really. If they are not leaking, there is no fluid in the aircraft.

                  In air either as you describe or most likely a fluid quantity loss is noticed on the gauges.
                  -Not an Airbus or Boeing guy here.
                  -20 year veteran on the USN Lockheed P-3 Orion.

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                  • #10
                    It can't have been a major problem as OJK was at LHR on saturday just gone doing the MEL service. It was sat next to our A380.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by B7772ADL View Post
                      It can't have been a major problem as OJK was at LHR on saturday just gone doing the MEL service. It was sat next to our A380.
                      Probably wasn't, Just ignorant press scaring the ignorant public... The normal when it comes to aviation.
                      -Not an Airbus or Boeing guy here.
                      -20 year veteran on the USN Lockheed P-3 Orion.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by P3_Super_Bee View Post
                        It's pretty simple really. If they are not leaking, there is no fluid in the aircraft.
                        Particularly if you are talking the SR-71!

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                        • #13
                          Sounds like old cars. Parking lots usually have an oilspot on each parking space. Not sure how long after you drive it away new that you start dripping everywhere you stop.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by EconomyClass View Post
                            Sounds like old cars. Parking lots usually have an oilspot on each parking space. Not sure how long after you drive it away new that you start dripping everywhere you stop.
                            Many dynamic seals, both auto and aircraft, rely on slight leakage (lubrication) to maintain seal efectiveness and prevent premature wearout.

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                            • #15
                              Qantas has confirmed the plane, which was today flying the QF32 service, was the same ageing aircraft involved in a mid-air explosion over the South China Sea on July 25 last year.



                              Media fear monging at its best
                              Signatures are overrated

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