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Birds thru the blender

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  • Birds thru the blender

    September 30, 2009 09:22am

    DWARFED by the jetliner, they look little more than a smattering of black dots.
    But this flock of birds could have brought the plane crashing down in seconds.
    They flew straight into the path of the Germania airlines flight to Kosovo as it took off from Dusseldorf airport with 80 on board.
    ‘It was like a scene from the Hitchcock movie The Birds. One second all was clear, and the next thing you saw were these birds swarming over the plane,’ said an onlooker.
    t
    It is thought more than 200 starlings were sucked into the right engine as the Boeing jet approached 200mph.
    Others dented the fuselage but thankfully did not pierce it. Their splattered remains could be seen on the plane later.
    ‘The pitch of the engine said it all,’ said plane-spotter Juergen Kienast, who took these dramatic pictures.
    ‘It was like sticking a bit of metal pipe into a blender.’
    Once airborne, the pilot reported engine damage and circled for almost 45 minutes before landing safely.





    http://www.news.com.au/couriermail/s...-17102,00.html



    Another report:

    200 birds sucked into jet's engines

    By staff writers
    news.com.au
    September 30, 2009 02:26pm

    PASSENGERS onboard a flight to Kosovo had a lucky escape when the plane was hit by more than 200 birds on takeoff.
    The flock of starlings were sucked into the right engine as the Germania Airlines jet took off from Dusseldorf Airport with 80 on board.
    Others dented the fuselage but thankfully did not pierce it. Their splattered remains could be seen on the plane later.
    Once airborne, the pilot reported engine damage and circled for almost 45 minutes before landing safely.
    A similar bird strike brought down an Airbus in the Hudson in New York in January this year.

    The pilot managed a heroic emergency landing and all 155 on board survived.
    http://www.news.com.au/travel/story/...014090,00.html


    Love the bold italicised comments. I often mistake fully grown geese for starlings...

  • #2
    IMAO Starlings are a menace in many ways to aviation, to agriculture and to nature aficionados. I’m sure they have some benefit in nature like maybe they keep insect swarms somewhat in check. However I consider them to be akin to rats with feathers. Starlings often flock in behavior that acts a lot like a swarm. They can be somewhat aggressive and have a tendency to bully and crowd out more desirable songbirds. Even though they are fairly small birds they can do a surprising amount of damage to aircraft because of their flocking behavior and because of their physiology. For their relatively small size they are quite dense, arrogant and aggressive; kind of like *“fascist liberals“. They can do a surprising amount of damage to aircraft engines and the aircraft’s body. Avian bullets (metaphor).

    Perhaps the airport should invest in a raptor patrol to try to reduce the amount of birds strikes in close proximity of the airport.

    * Humorous analogy as a jab. Also making fun of my own obsession and peoples reactions to my usage of certain words.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by SYDCBRWOD View Post
      ........................The pilot managed a heroic emergency landing and all 155 on board survived. ..............
      More hype from the media. Aircraft are designed to survive this type of incident - during engine development testing birds, gravel, ice, and water are fired into the engine.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Highkeas View Post
        More hype from the media. Aircraft are designed to survive this type of incident - during engine development testing birds, gravel, ice, and water are fired into the engine.
        of course. but 200?!?!

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        • #5
          Originally posted by TeeVee View Post
          of course. but 200?!?!
          Starlings are probably less of a problem then large hail - how may hail stones are shot through an engine during qualification? I do not know the answer.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by TeeVee View Post
            of course. but 200?!?!
            Well yes, you need that many starlings for a good feed. They come out the other end tenderised, mostly plucked and cooked to perfection. The kerosine baste is an acquired taste but the birds that go through the hot section of the engine are even crispy!

            I believe Michelin awarded "Starlings 'd' CFM" 3 chef's hats. Bon appetite!

            Damn expensive dish to prepare though...

            Comment


            • #7
              Here is an interesting document that describes bird ingestion requirements and testing:
              http://birdstrikecanada.com/document...gineDesign.pdf

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Highkeas View Post
                More hype from the media. Aircraft are designed to survive this type of incident - during engine development testing birds, gravel, ice, and water are fired into the engine.
                You do realise that this engine did not "survive", what if they had 100 birds in each engine? Potomac all over again? Engines designed to survive? What exactly?
                Per
                Ancient Mariner
                Certified above and below...................sea level.

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                • #9
                  Tuesday 27 SEP on a Delta Shuttle plane on final for RWY22 at LaGuardia. A few more strikes and we'll have completely eliminated all winged wildlife around New York...

                  Parlour Talker Extraordinaire

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Vnav View Post
                    Tuesday 27 SEP on a Delta Shuttle plane on final for RWY22 at LaGuardia. A few more strikes and we'll have completely eliminated all winged wildlife around New York...


                    Holy $hit!

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                    • #11
                      Did the bird survive the radome impact?

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by TheRealAncientMarine View Post
                        You do realise that this engine did not "survive", what if they had 100 birds in each engine? Potomac all over again? Engines designed to survive? What exactly?
                        Per

                        I said "aircraft are designed to survive."

                        Meaning survive such things as engine disintegration, bird strikes, lightning strikes, and hail (I've seen some severe damage caused by hail).

                        This does not mean that an aircraft will survive all the time (for example the Sioux City DC-10) but the odds are that it will.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Verbal
                          Did the bird survive the radome impact?


                          "Oh they're just fine....they're flying right now.....free to pursue a life of religious fulfillment"





                          Somewhat similar radome location to another MD80 strike last year in Austin (portion of NTSB report follows)



                          A commercial air carrier was on a visual approach to a FAR Part 139 airport when it struck a bird (Black Vulture) approximately 9 miles from the airport at an altitude of 1,800 feet above ground level. The impact resulted in airframe vibrations; however, both of the turbofan engine indications remained normal. The airplane landed uneventfully, and further examination revealed that the vulture struck the lower right hand corner of the radome. The impact resulted in damage to the glide slope antenna mount, the lower nose-web, and outer fuselage skin. In addition, the forward bulkhead (non-pressurized) fuselage rib was torn. Blood was also observed on the right engine's nacelle; however, an inspection of the first and second stage blades revealed no damage.

                          Parlour Talker Extraordinaire

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Vnav View Post
                            Tuesday 27 SEP on a Delta Shuttle plane on final for RWY22 at LaGuardia. A few more strikes and we'll have completely eliminated all winged wildlife around New York...
                            Vnav, have you ever?

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Apooh View Post
                              Vnav, have you ever?

                              No, Never!...


                              ...Absolutely not......


                              ....Well, maybe once.....


                              ....But I was drunk at the time....


                              ....I felt so dirty that I swore I'd never do it again.
                              Parlour Talker Extraordinaire

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